Mel Rosenberg

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Mel Rosenberg
Born Melvyn Rosenberg
(1951-11-12) November 12, 1951 (age 62)
Winnipeg, Canada
Residence Israel
Nationality Israel Israeli, Canada Canadian
Ethnicity Jewish
Education B.Sc., Hebrew University of Jerusalem
M.S., Tel Aviv University
Ph.D., Tel Aviv University
Occupation Microbiologist
Employer Tel Aviv University
Holon Institute of Technology
Title Professor
Religion Jewish
Spouse(s) Shulamit Sapir-Nevo
Children Assif Rosenberg-Nevo
Adar Rosenberg-Nevo
Website
http://www.melrosenberg.com/

Mel Rosenberg (born Melvyn Rosenberg, 12 November 1951 in Winnipeg, Canada) is a microbiologist best known for his research on the diagnosis and treatment of bad breath (halitosis).

Early Life and education[edit]

Mel Rosenberg (Hebrew: מל רוזנברג) was born in Winnipeg, Canada in 1951. He grew up in Ottawa and immigrated to Israel in 1969. He received his Bachelor of Science from Hebrew University (1973) and went on to pursue both his Masters of Science (1975) and Ph.D. (1982) at Tel Aviv University.

Academic professional[edit]

Rosenberg performed his Ph.D. research in the area of petroleum microbiology, under the supervision of Eugene Rosenberg and David Gutnick. His first publication as a graduate student, on the adhesion of microorganisms to oil droplets (1980),[1] became the most highly cited publication of FEMS Microbiology Journal and a "Citation Classic" by the Science Citation Index of 1991.[1][2]

After receiving his doctorate in microbiology, Rosenberg held various faculty positions at the Sackler Faculty of Medicine and Goldschleger School of Dental Medicine at Tel Aviv University, and has received honorary appointments at the University of Rochester, University of Pennsylvania, University College London (Eastman Dental Hospital) and University of Toronto.

Rosenberg's interest in the diagnosis and treatment of bad breath (halitosis) began in the mid 1980s. Research conducted in his laboratory at Tel Aviv University led to the development of two-phase mouthwashes, now popular in the UK (under the name Dentyl pH) and elsewhere. He is also the inventor or co-inventor of several other patents, including two microbial inoculation tools, the Quadloop and the Diaslide, and upside-down spray for treatment of shoe odor, a deodorant for use in the shower, and anti-microbial flavor combinations (Breathanol). Rosenberg's research also led to the application of the Halimeter, a volatile sulfide monitor, as an adjunct apparatus for the measurement of oral malodor. Rosenberg has edited several professional textbooks on bad breath and has written several reviews on the subject, notably "The Science of Bad Breath", published in Scientific American in 2002.[3] Together with Anton Amann, he serves as Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Breath Research, published by the Institute of Physics.

Mel Rosenberg pursues parallel careers as a jazz singer and musician, and author of children's books on dental health and well-being.

Selected publications[edit]

  • Shuster, A; Korem, M; Jacob-Hirsch, J; Amariglio, N; Rechavi, G; Rosenberg, M (2011). "Microbial alcohol-conferred hemolysis is a late response to alcohol stress". FEMS Yeast Res. 11 (4): 315–23. doi:10.1111/j.1567-1364.2011.00722.x. PMID 21276200. 
  • Korem, M; Gov, Y; Rosenberg, M (2010). "Global gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus following exposure to alcohol". Microb Pathog. 48 (2): 74–84. doi:10.1016/j.micpath.2009.11.002. PMID 19900530. 
  • Shirron, N; Korem, M; Shuster, A; Leikin-Frankel, A; Rosenberg, M (2008). "Effect of Alcohol on Bacterial Hemolysis". Curr Microbiol. 57 (4): 318–25. doi:10.1007/s00284-008-9196-7. PMID 18661181. 
  • Rosenberg, M (2002). "The science of bad breath". Scientific American 286 (4): 72–9. Bibcode:2002SciAm.286d..72R. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0402-72. PMID 11905111.  presenting a circumferential overview of Halitosis.
  • Tal, H; Rosenberg, M (1990). "Estimation of dental plaque levels and gingival inflammation using a simple oral rinse technique". J Periodontol. 61 (6): 339–42. doi:10.1902/jop.1990.61.6.339. PMID 2366142.  which shows the effect of mouth rinsing on the oral bacteria.
  • Goldberg, S; Konis, Y; Rosenberg, M (1990). "Effect of Cetylpyridinium Chloride on Microbial Adhesion to Hexadecane and Polystyrene". Appl Environ Microbiol. 56 (6): 1678–82. PMC 184492. PMID 16348211.  This article shows how hidrophobicity of CPC affects oral bacteria, as the research basis for the invention of a two-phase mouthwash.
  • Rosenberg, M; Septon, I; Eli, I; Bar-Ness, R; Gelernter, I; Brenner, S; Gabbay, J (1991). "Halitosis measurement by an industrial sulphide monitor". J Periodontol. 62 (8): 487–9. doi:10.1902/jop.1991.62.8.487. PMID 1920015.  which was the basis for the commercial use of sulphide monitors such as the Halimeter to measure halitosis.
  • Bosy, A; Kulkarni, GV; Rosenberg, M; McCulloch, CAG (1994). "Relationship of oral malodor to periodontitis: evidence of independence in discrete subpopulations". J Periodontol. 65 (1): 37–46. doi:10.1902/jop.1994.65.1.37. PMID 8133414.  starting an academic debate on the role of periodontitis in halitosis.
  • Kozlovsky, A; Gordon, D; Gelernter, I; Rosenberg, M; Rosenberg, M (1994). "Correlation between the BANA test and oral malodor parameters". J Dent Res. 73 (5): 1036–42. PMID 8006229.  another article which shows the relation between a periodontal test to malodor parameters.
  • Rosenberg, M; Kozlovsky, A; Gelernter, I; Cherniak, O; Gabbay, J; Baht, R; Eli, I (1995). "Self-estimation of oral malodor". J Dent Res. 74 (9): 1577–82. doi:10.1177/00220345950740091201. PMID 7560419.  laying an important grounds to research of the psychopathological aspects of halitosis.

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b Rosenberg, M.; Gutnick, D.; Rosenberg, E. (1980). "Adherence of bacteria to hydrocarbons: A simple method for measuring cell-surface hydrophobicity". FEMS Microbiology Letters 9: 29. doi:10.1111/j.1574-6968.1980.tb05599.x. 
  2. ^ The citation classic of 1991 http://www.garfield.library.upenn.edu/classics1991/A1991FE76400001.pdf
  3. ^ Rosenberg, M (2002). "The science of bad breath". Scientific American 286 (4): 72–9. Bibcode:2002SciAm.286d..72R. doi:10.1038/scientificamerican0402-72. PMID 11905111. 

External links[edit]