Melanie Williams

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Melanie Williams is a British singer. She sang on the hit single, "Ain't No Love (Ain't No Use)" alongside the Manchester dance outfit Sub Sub.[1][2]

Career[edit]

Williams was a friend of Sub Sub at the time, and the band, searching for a female guest vocalist, featured her vocals. This helped expose her talents to the public, and was followed by further critical success.

Williams and her writing colleague Eric Gooden, found Square One Studios in Bury, Greater Manchester. The proprietor Trevor Taylor, liked what he heard and they began recording a string of tracks assisted by house engineer and musician Stephen Boyce-Buckley, subsequently landing a recording contract with 10 Records; a sub-division of Virgin Records.

Williams launched a solo career in 1994 as a soul/dance singer, signed to Columbia Records. Her debut solo single, "All Cried Out!" peaked at #60 in the UK Singles Chart.[3] The follow-up, "Everyday Thang", did better, hitting the UK Top 40. It peaked at #38. Her next single, the ballad "Not Enough?" managed a #65 chart placing.[3] Her debut album, Human Cradle, failed to reach the UK Albums Chart.

Williams has also featured on the Adrian Snell album, Father, in which she read Psalm 139.

Early in 1995, Williams returned to the UK Top 40 with a cover of "You Are Everything" (a duet with Joe Roberts). The song reached #28.[3]

The Other Two's second album, Super Highways, featured Williams on some tracks as co-writer and guest vocalist.

Discography[edit]

  • 1990 Father
  • 1991 Eric Gooden & Melanie Williams - Temper Temper
  • 1994 Human Cradle
  • 2001 Dark Flower (Joe Roberts & Melanie Williams) - Feed My Soul [4]
  • 2007 Bodhi

References[edit]

  1. ^ Welch, Andy (April 6, 2009). "Doves actually". Evening Herald. Retrieved 14 September 2010. 
  2. ^ "Doves in the ascendant". Belfast Telegraph. 10 April 2009. Retrieved 14 September 2010. 
  3. ^ a b c Roberts, David (2006). British Hit Singles & Albums (19th ed.). London: Guinness World Records Limited. p. 604. ISBN 1-904994-10-5. 
  4. ^ "Dark Flower Discography at Discogs". Discogs.com. Retrieved 2014-06-03. 

External links[edit]