Melkite Christianity in Lebanon

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Lebanese Melkite Christians
Peter IV Geraigiry.jpg BISHOP-john-adel-elya.JPG Marwan Fares.JPG
Charbel Nahas.png Majida El Roumi in a portrait from 1994.jpg Keyrouz credo.jpg
Total population
215,000[1][2]
Languages
Vernacular:
Lebanese Arabic
Religion
Christianity (Melkite Catholic)
Related ethnic groups
Other Lebanese & Levantine Arabs  • Ghassanids Arabs  • Phoenicians

Melkite Christianity in Lebanon refers to adherents of the Melkite Greek Catholic Church in Lebanon, which is the third Christian denomination in the country after the Maronite Christianity in Lebanon and Orthodox Christianity in Lebanon. The Lebanese Melkite Christians are believed to constitute about 5%[1][2] of the total population of Lebanon. Within the Lebanese context, especially political, the group is seen as an ethnoreligious group.[3][4]

Demographics[edit]

The Greek Catholics live primarily in the central and eastern parts of the country, dispersed in many villages. Members of this rite are concentrated in Beirut, Zahlah, and the suburbs of Sidon. They have a relatively higher level of education than other denominations. Proud of their Arab heritage, Greek Catholics have been able to strike a balance between their openness to the Arab world and their identification with the West. Greek Catholics are estimated to constitute 5% of Lebanon's population of approximately 4.3 million, which means they amount to 215,000.[1]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "2012 Report on International Religious Freedom - Lebanon". United States Department of State. 20 May 2013. Retrieved 15 December 2013. 
  2. ^ a b Lebanon - International Religious Freedom Report 2008 U.S. Department of State. Retrieved on 2013-06-13.
  3. ^ David Levinson (1 January 1998). Ethnic Groups Worldwide: A Ready Reference Handbook. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 249. ISBN 978-1-57356-019-1. Retrieved 28 December 2013. 
  4. ^ Michael Slackman. (9 November 2006) Christians Struggle to Preserve a Balance of Power The New York Times. Retrieved 28 December 2013.