Melvin Rhyne

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Melvin Rhyne
Born (1936-10-12)October 12, 1936
Indianapolis, United States
Died March 5, 2013(2013-03-05) (aged 76)
Indianapolis, United States
Genres Jazz, Hard bop
Occupations Organist, Bandleader, Composer
Instruments Organ
Years active 1955-2013
Associated acts Wes Montgomery,
Rob Dixon, Herb Ellis,
Brian Lynch

Melvin Rhyne (October 12, 1936 – March 5, 2013) Indianapolis, Indiana[1]), was a jazz organist best known for his work with Wes Montgomery.[2]

Biography[edit]

Melvin Rhyne was born in Indianapolis in 1936 and started playing the piano shortly thereafter. At 19 years old, Rhyne started playing piano with then-unknown tenor saxophonist Rahsaan Roland Kirk but quickly switched over to the instrument that would make him famous: the Hammond B3 organ. Rhyne's piano skills translated to the organ fluently and before long he was backing famous blues players like B.B. King and T-Bone Walker.[3] In 1959 he was asked to join fellow Indianapolis musician Wes Montgomery's newly formed trio.[4]

Rhyne then moved to Wisconsin and largely kept to himself for the next two decades. In 1991, however, Rhyne returned to the jazz scene, playing on Herb Ellis' album Roll Call, Brian Lynch's At the Main Event, and his own comeback The Legend. Rhyne continued to be prolific in the years to come, releasing eight more solo albums on the Criss Cross jazz label.[5] Rhyne also recorded with The Mark Ladley Trio for the 1992 release, Strictly Business[6] and the 1994 release, Evidence.[7] Both landed in the Jazz Charts at CMJ New Music Report and The Gavin Report. The group also appeared on a Jazziz Magazine sampler disc during that time.[8] Altenburgh Records postumously released, Final Call in 2013 by the same group.[9]

In 2008 Rhyne teamed up with fellow Indianapolis jazz musician Rob Dixon to form the Dixon-Rhyne Project, a boundary-pushing jazz quartet that also includes Chicago guitarist Fareed Haque and drummer Kenny Phelps. The quartet released the album Reinvention in 2008 on Indianapolis jazz label Owl Studios.[10] Rhyne's later career trio included drummer Kenny Washington and guitarist Peter Bernstein in the same organ, guitar, drum formation of the original Wes Montgomery Trio.[11]

Discography[edit]

Year Artist Title Label
1959 The Wes Montgomery Trio Guitar on the Go Riverside
1959 The Wes Montgomery Trio Round Midnight Riverside
1960 Melvin Rhyne Organ-izing Jazzland
1963 The Wes Montgomery Trio Boss Guitar Riverside
1963 The Wes Montgomery Trio Portrait of Wes Riverside
1969 Johnny Shacklett At The Hofman House Universal Artists
1969 Buddy Montgomery This Rather Than That Impulse!
1991 Herb Ellis Roll Call Justice Records
1991 Brian Lynch Quintet At The Main Event Criss Cross
1991 Melvin Rhyne Trio The Legend Criss Cross
1992 Mark Ladley Strictly Business Altenburgh Records
1992 Melvin Rhyne To Cannonball with Love Paddle Wheel Records
1993 Ronald Muldrow Yesterdays Enja Records
1993 Mark Ladley Evidence Altenburgh Records
1993 Mark Ladley Coop's Blues Jazziz Magazine Sampler Disc Volume 7
1993 Melvin Rhyne Quartet Boss Organ Criss Cross
1993 The Tenor Triangle with The Melvin Rhyne Trio Tell it Like it Is Criss Cross
1994 The Tenor Triangle with The Melvin Rhyne Trio Aztec Blues Criss Cross
1994 Project G-5 A Tribute to Wes Montgomery Evidence
1995 Royce Campbell Trio Make Me Rainbows Positive
1995 Melvin Rhyne Trio Mel's Spell Criss Cross
1995 Melvin Rhyne Quartet Stick to the Kick Criss Cross
1999 Melvin Rhyne Trio Kojo Criss Cross
1999 Mel Rhyne Remembering Wes Savant
2000 Melvin Rhyne Quartet Classmasters Criss Cross
2004 Melvin Rhyne Trio Tomorrow Yesterday Today Criss Cross
2007 Melvin Rhyne Front & Center Criss Cross
2008 The Dixon-Rhyne Project Reinvention Owl Studios
2013 Mark Ladley Final Call Altenburgh Records

References[edit]

  1. ^ Obituary by Jeff Tamarkin in JazzTimes
  2. ^ Yanow, Scott. "Melvin Rhyne: Biography". Allmusic. Retrieved 2010-03-22. 
  3. ^ Yanow, Scott (1936-10-12). "Melvin Rhyne - Music Biography, Credits and Discography". AllMusic. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  4. ^ "Melvin Rhyne". Bing. 1936-10-12. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  5. ^ Profiles, Jazz (2010-12-04). "Jazz Profiles: Mel Rhyne: 1937-2013 - R.I.P. [From the Archives]". Jazzprofiles.blogspot.com. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  6. ^ https://itunes.apple.com/us/album/strictly-business/id625160175
  7. ^ http://www.allmusic.com/album/evidence-mw0000595850
  8. ^ http://www.discogs.com/Various-Jazziz-Magazine-On-Disc-September-1993-Volume-7/release/2360935
  9. ^ http://www.altenburgh.com/the-mark-ladley-trio-with-melvin-rhyne.html
  10. ^ "The Dixon-Rhyne Project: Reinvention". Allaboutjazz.com. 2008-06-19. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 
  11. ^ "Melvin Rhyne". Crisscrossjazz.com. 2013-02-19. Retrieved 2013-03-07. 

External links[edit]