Members of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors

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The Board of Supervisors meets in San Francisco City Hall.
Current United States Senator Dianne Feinstein served as supervisor from 1970 to 1978 and as president in 1978.

The San Francisco Board of Supervisors is the legislative body of San Francisco, California. The body consists of eleven members elected from single-member districts through ranked choice voting.

From 1977 to 1979, and starting again in 2000, supervisors were elected from eleven single-member districts. Prior to 1977 and from 1980 to 1998, members were elected at-large, all running on one ballot, with the top vote-getters winning office. In 1980, elections shifted from odd-numbered years to even-numbered years, and because of the shift from district to at-large elections, all seats were up for election, with some members winning four-year terms and some winning two-year terms. Similar cases of supervisors elected to truncated terms happened in 1977 and 2000, when elections shifted to district elections.

Several members were initially appointed by the mayor. San Francisco's city charter gives the mayor the power to fill any vacancies[1] and to suspend members in limited circumstances;[2] the latter case has happened only once, when Mayor Gavin Newsom suspended Ed Jew due to allegations of lying about his residency and extortion.[3] A few members were elected to the board, but appointed to their seat by the mayor during the weeks between the election and the beginning of their term. This has generally been done when supervisors were elected to the state legislature, since the terms of state legislators begin earlier than those of supervisors. The most recent example occurred in 2008, when David Campos was elected to the District 9 seat held by Tom Ammiano. In the same election, Ammiano was elected to the California State Assembly and resigned his seat a month early to take his new office. Mayor Gavin Newsom appointed Campos to the seat on December 4, 2008, a month before he would otherwise have taken office.[4]

Board presidents[edit]

The President of the Board of Supervisors presides over all Board meetings and appoints members to Board committees, among other duties. Board presidents are elected by their colleagues at the beginning of every odd-numbered year, or when a vacancy arises in the office.[5] From 1982 to 2000, the city charter specified that the president would be the highest vote-getter in the previous election, taking the power of electing the board president away from the supervisors themselves, except in the case of a vacancy in the post.[6][7]

Katy Tang David Chiu (politician) Aaron Peskin Matt Gonzalez Tom Ammiano Barbara Kaufman Angela Alioto Kevin Shelley Doris M. Ward Harry Britt Nancy G. Walker Wendy Nelder Quentin L. Kopp John L. Molinari Dianne Feinstein

Board members[edit]

No official list of supervisors in office prior to 1906 exists as the 1906 San Francisco earthquake destroyed all Board of Supervisors records. However, the names of San Francisco supervisors are recorded in many documents and newspapers from the time.

Common Council[edit]

The San Francisco Common Council was the predecessor of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors. The common council was made up of the Board of Aldermen and the Board of Assistant Aldermen, each composed of one member elected from each of the city's eight wards. The first elections to these posts took place on May 1, 1850 (the same day as the vote on the city charter), and the common council took office on May 6, 1850.[8]

The seventh and last common council served until July 1856, when under the Consolidation Act that unified city and county government in San Francisco, the common council was replaced by the first board of supervisors.[8]

Four-member board (July–November 1856)[edit]

The first board of supervisors served only from July 8 to November 15, 1856, and consisted of one justice of the peace for each of the city's four districts. These four men chose George J. Whelan as the city's mayor and president of the board.

Year President District
1 2 3 4
July–November 1856 George J. Whelan Lawrence Ryan E.W. Smith C.M. Chamberlain David B. Castree


12-member district (19th century)[edit]

Supervisors from the 19th century are listed in surviving copies of municipal reports, contemporary newspapers, and similar sources.[8][9][10][11]

Year Ward
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
November 1856–1857 Charles Wilson W.A. Darling W.K. Van Alen M.R. Roberts Samuel Merritt Charles W. Bond[A] H.A. George N.C. Lane W.L. Palmer R.G. Sneath J.J. Denny S.S. Tilton
1858 L.B. Benchley Thomas Tennent[B]
1859 Charles S. Biden H.S. Gates Thomas Young J.S. Paxson W. McKibbin J.C. Corbett
1860 Joseph Britton F.W. Brooks J.S. Davies W.B. Johnson James Otis[G] A.G. Randall[C] John C. Ayres[D] John Lynch[E]
1861 H. De La Montaya D. Gaven H.L. Dodge W.C. Hinckley Eugene Crowell Frank McCoppin
1862 Myles D. Sweeney H.L. King Gerritt W. Bell John C. Merrill J.H. Redington[H] James W. Cudworth[F]
1863 A.H. Titcomb Giles H. Gray
1864 John Fay E.C. Kennedy A.S. Baldwin E.N. Torrey A.H. Cummings Michael Cody
1865 Isaac Rowell Monroe Ashbury Charles Clayton A.J. Shrader
1866 R.P. Clement William S. Phelps Jacob Schreiber James H. Reynolds Charles H. Stanyan
1867 P.H. Daly W.B. Farman F.G.E. Tittell
1868 Henry Winkle John Harrold Edward Flaherty R. Beverly Cole D.D. Shattuck J.B.E. Cavallier Edward Nunan P.H. Canavan
1869 Richard Ring
1870 Timothy McCarthy Alexander Badlam Charles R. Story James Adams M.J. Kelly
1871 Stewart Menzies James J. Kenney Robert Goodwin A.B. Forbes Edward Commins
1872 H.F. Swain Henry L. King James Barrett Samuel Penfield Taylor
1873
1874 William C. Pease A.M. Ebbets John R. Sims James H. Deering James B. Roberts A.L. Wangenheim Abram Block A.W. Scott George Hewston M. Lynch D.A. Macdonald
1875 Abram Block
1876 August Drucker C.B. Edwards Thomas Bryan John H. Wise John P. Shine Frederick W. Eaton George W. Hayes Fleet F. Strother Thomas Boyce John C. Roberts Frederick A. Gibbs
1877
1878 John Foley Martin Mangels Horace L. Hill Edwin Danforth J. Henley Smith James O. Rountree John W. Farren Thomas S. Ackerson A.W. Scott Robert Haight Henry Brickwedel
1879 Thomas A. Talbert
1880 Antone Schottler John Mason J.M. Litchfield Samuel Drake James D. Whitney Frank Eastman Hugh Fraser Charles L. Taylor Micah Doane Charles A. Bayly Erastus N. Torrey James B. Stetson
1881
1882 William H. Bodfish John C. McKew John Shirley John H. Carmany Henry Molineaux George Torrens George B. Bradford Charles A. Fisher Oliver Merrill Henry B. Russ Nathan C. Parrish John F. Kennedy
1883 John T. Sullivan John J. Reichenbach Charles H. Burton J. Henley Smith Edward B. Pond John D. Griffin Fleet F. Strother John B. Lewis Herman Ranken Jefferson G. James Thomas Ashworth
1884
1885 Justin Gates Robert Roy John E. Kunkler John E. Abbott Willard B. Farwell James Williamson David L. Farnsworth Albert Heyer James Gilleran Daniel McMillan Samuel Valleau
1886
1887 Hugh Curran James M. McDonald Colin M. Boyd Joseph Pescia Charles S. Bush Aaron M. Burns William Hawkins Albert F. Knorp William P. Lambert Herman Joost Sargent S. Morton
1888
1889 Henry Bingham Levi R. Ellert Peter Wheelan Diedrich Becker Henry Pilster Vincent Kingwell David Barry Patrick Noble
1890 Selden S. Wright
1891 Henry Evans David B. Jackson James W. Burling John. B. Curtis Washington Ayer George A. Carnes Patrick J. Coffee Albert Heyer Denis D. Hunt Charles W. Taber William Wilkinson
1892 Joseph A. Artigues
1893 Michael Goodwin Daniel Rogers William Montgomery James I. Stanton C.W. Nevin Patrick J. Kennedy Sands W. Forman Christian Reis James Ryan Robert Day Patrick F. Dundon William M. Hinton Jefferson G. James James Denman
1894
1895 Joseph King Peter A. Scully Charles E. Benjamin Alphonse Hirsch Joseph I. Dimond Edward C. Hughes Christopher Dunker Charles L. Taylor Alfred W. Morgenstern Adolph B. Spreckels John K.C. Hobbs Edward L. Wagner
1896
1897 Lawrence Devany Thomas H. Haskins P.M. Delany John H. Sheehan Washington Dodge John Lackmann T.A. Rottanzi Thomas Morton James E. Britt Edward J. Smith Charles A. Clinton Thomas W. Rivers
1898
1899 Edward Holland Edward C. Kalben Howard Black Edward L. Perrault William H. Phelps John Lackmann Lewis F. Byington George W. Collins Albert Heyer Jeremiah Deasy Arthur Attridge Edward H. Algeltinger
1900
... missing data
Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12
Ward
  • A Charles W. Bond resigned April 7, 1858.
  • B Thomas Tennett took his seat May 21, 1858.
  • C A.G. Randall resigned February 13, 1860.
  • D John C. Ayres took his seat May 7, 1860.
  • E John Lynch resigned October 7, 1861.
  • F James W. Cudworth took his seat November 4, 1861.
  • G James Otis resigned November 25, 1861, "as he is under the necessity of absenting himself from the State for the next few months".
  • H J.H. Redington took his seat December 30, 1861.

15-member at-large (1932–1934)[edit]

Year Seat
1932 Samuel Breyer Arthur M. Brown, Jr. Victor Canepa Jesse Colman Andrew J. Gallagher Franck R. Havenner J. Emmet Hayden James McSheehy Carl W. Miles Jefferson Peyser James E. Power Warren Shannon Alfred Roncovieri E. Jack Spaulding William P. Stanton
1933
Year Seat

11-member at-large (1934–1977)[edit]

Year Seat
1934 Jesse Colman Franck R. Havenner Andrew J. Gallagher James McSheehy John Ratto Samuel Breyer Arthur M. Brown, Jr. Adolph Schmidt Adolph Uhl Alfred Roncovieri Warren Shannon
1935 J. Emmet Hayden
1936 Dewey Mead Fred W. Meyer
1937 George R. Reilly
1938
1939 John F. McGowan
1940
1941
1942 Gerald O'Gara Chester MacPhee Robert M. Green Daniel Gallagher
1943 James Gartland
1944 Edward Mancuso John J. Sullivan
1945
1946 Marvin E. Lewis P. J. McMurray George Christopher
1947 J. Joseph Sullivan
1948 Chris J. Christensen Don Fazackerley
1949 James Halley
1950
1951
1952 Byron Arnold John J. Ferdon Harold Dobbs Francis McCarty
1953 James Halley
1954 J. Eugene McAteer Matthew Carberry Clarissa McMahon
1955 William C. Blake Charles Ertola James Halley
1956 Joseph M. Casey James J. Sullivan Henry Rolph
1957
1958 Alfonso Zirpoli
1959 J. Joseph Sullivan
1960
1961 Jesse Colman Joseph E. Tinney Peter Tamaras
1962 Jack Morrison Roger Boas
1963 J. Max Moore
1964 Leo T. McCarthy George Moscone
1965 John Ertola Terry Francois
1966 Kevin O'Shea
1967 Dorothy von Beroldingen Josiah H. "Joe" Beeman V
1968 Robert H. Mendelsohn James Mailliard Ron Pelosi
1969 Robert E. Gonzales
1970 Dianne Feinstein John Barbagelata
1971 Michael J. Driscoll
1972 John L. Molinari Quentin L. Kopp
1973 George Chinn
1974 Alfred Nelder
1975
1976
1977 Gordon Lau Jane Murphy
Year Seat

11-seat district (1978–1980)[edit]

Year District
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
1978 Gordon Lau Dianne Feinstein John L. Molinari Ella Hill Hutch Harvey Milk Carol Ruth Silver Robert E. Gonzales Dan White Lee S. Dolson Quentin L. Kopp Ron Pelosi
1979 Louise Renne Harry Britt Donald T. Horanzy
1980 Ed Lawson Doris M. Ward Nancy G. Walker John Bardis
Year 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
District

11-seat at-large (1981–2000)[edit]

Year Seat
1981 Carol Ruth Silver Richard Hongisto John L. Molinari Louise Renne Harry Britt Ella Hill Hutch Doris M. Ward Wendy Nelder Lee S. Dolson Quentin L. Kopp Nancy G. Walker
1982 Willie B. Kennedy
1983 Bill J. Maher
1984
1985
1986 Tom Hsieh Jim Gonzalez
1987
1988
1989 Terence Hallinan Angela Alioto
1990
1991 Kevin Shelley Roberta Achtenberg Carole Migden
1992 Annemarie Conroy
1993 Sue Bierman Barbara Kaufman
1994 Susan Leal
1995 Mabel Teng Tom Ammiano
1996 Leslie Katz
1997 Michael Yaki Gavin Newsom José Medina Leland Yee Amos Brown
1998
1999 Mark Leno
2000 Alicia Becerril
Year Seat

11-seat district (2001–present)[edit]

Year District
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11
2001 Jake McGoldrick Gavin Newsom Aaron Peskin Leland Yee Matt Gonzalez Chris Daly Tony Hall Mark Leno Tom Ammiano Sophie Maxwell Gerardo Sandoval
2002
2003 Fiona Ma Bevan Dufty
2004 Michela Alioto-Pier
2005 Ross Mirkarimi Sean Elsbernd
2006
2007 Ed Jew
2008 Carmen Chu
2009 Eric Mar David Chiu David Campos John Avalos
2010
2011 Mark Farrell Jane Kim Scott Wiener Malia Cohen
2012 Christina Olague
2013 Katy Tang London Breed Norman Yee
2014
2015 appointment due

Board members and transitions since 1980[edit]

Name Dates Comments
Terry A. Francois 1964–1978 Appointed 1964 by Mayor John F. Shelley to succeed Supervisor John J. Ferdon. Elected 1967, 1971, and 1975.
Robert H. Mendelsohn 1968–1977 Elected 1967, 1971, and 1975. Resigned 1977 to accept appointment by President Jimmy Carter as Assistant Secretary of the Interior.
Ronald Pelosi 1968–1980 Elected 1967, 1971, 1975, and 1977. Defeated for re-election 1979.[12]
Robert E. Gonzales 1969–1980 Appointed 1969 by Mayor Joseph Alioto to succeed Supervisor Leo T. McCarthy. Elected 1971, 1975, and 1977.
Dianne Feinstein* 1970–1978 Elected 1969, 1973, and 1977. Served as acting mayor upon the assassination of Mayor George Moscone in 1978. Elected mayor by the Board of Supervisors one week later.
Quentin L. Kopp* 1972–1986 Elected 1971, 1975, 1977, 1980, and 1984. Resigned 1986 after election to the California State Senate.
John L. Molinari* 1972–1989 Elected 1971, 1975, 1977, 1979, 1980, and 1984. Did not seek re-election in 1988.
Gordon J. Lau 1977–1980 Appointed 1977 by Mayor George Moscone to succeed Supervisor Robert H. Mendelsohn. Elected 1977.
Jane McKaskle Murphy 1977–1978 Appointed 1977 by Mayor George Moscone to succeed Supervisor Dorothy von Beroldingen.
Lee S. Dolson 1978–1980, 1981–1983 Elected 1977. Defeated for re-election 1979. Elected 1980. Defeated for re-election 1982.
Ella Hill Hutch 1978–1981 Elected 1977 and 1980. Died in office in 1981.
Harvey Milk 1978-1978 Elected 1977. Assassinated 1978.
Carol Ruth Silver 1978–1988 Elected 1977, 1980, and 1984. Defeated for re-election 1988.
Dan White 1978-1978 Elected 1977. Resigned 1978. Assassinated Mayor George Moscone and Supervisor Harvey Milk.
Donald T. Horanzy 1978–1981 Appointed 1978 by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to succeed Supervisor Dan White.
Louise Renne 1978–1986 Appointed 1978 by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to succeed Feinstein on the Board of Supervisors. Elected 1980 and 1984. Resigned 1986 to accept appointment by Feinstein as city attorney.
Harry Britt* 1979–1993 Appointed 1979 by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to succeed Supervisor Harvey Milk. Elected 1980, 1984, and 1988. Did not seek re-election in 1992.
John Bardis 1980–1981 Elected 1979. Defeated for re-election 1980.
Ed Lawson 1980–1981 Elected 1979.
Nancy G. Walker* 1980–1991 Elected 1979, 1980, 1982, and 1986. Did not seek re-election in 1990.
Doris M. Ward* 1980–1992 Elected 1979, 1980, 1982, 1986, and 1990. Resigned 1992 to accept appointment by Mayor Frank Jordan as assessor.
Richard D. Hongisto 1981–1991 Elected 1980, 1982, and 1986. Did not seek re-election in 1990, running successfully for assessor.
Wendy Nelder* 1981–1991 Elected 1980, 1982, and 1986. Did not seek re-election in 1990, running unsuccessfully for assessor.
Willie B. Kennedy 1981–1996 Appointed 1981 by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to succeed Supervisor Ella Hill Hutch. Elected 1984, 1988, and 1992. Resigned 1996 to become administrative officer of the Public Transition Development Corporation.
Bill Maher 1983–1995 Elected 1982, 1986, and 1990. Ineligible to seek re-election in 1994.
Tom Hsieh 1986–1997 Appointed 1986 by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to succeed Supervisor Louise Renne. Elected 1988 and 1992. Ineligible to seek re-election in 1996.
Jim Gonzalez 1986–1993 Appointed 1986 by Mayor Dianne Feinstein to succeed Supervisor Quentin L. Kopp. Elected 1988. Defeated for re-election 1992.
Angela Alioto* 1989–1997 Elected 1988 and 1992. Ineligible to seek re-election in 1996.
Terence Hallinan 1989–1996 Elected 1988 and 1992. Resigned 1996 after election as district attorney.
Carole Migden 1991–1996 Elected 1990 and 1994. Resigned 1996 after election to the California State Assembly.
Roberta Achtenberg 1991–1993 Elected 1990. Resigned 1993 to accept appointment by President Bill Clinton as Assistant Secretary of Housing and Urban Development.
Kevin Shelley* 1991–1996 Elected 1990 and 1994. Resigned 1996 after election to the California State Assembly.
Annemarie Conroy 1992–1995 Appointed 1992 by Mayor Frank Jordan to succeed Supervisor Doris M. Ward. Defeated for first election in 1994.
Sue Bierman 1993–2001 Elected 1992 and 1996. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2000.
Barbara Kaufman* 1993–2001 Elected 1992 and 1996. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2000.
Susan Leal 1993–1998 Appointed 1993 by Mayor Frank Jordan to succeed Supervisor Roberta Achtenberg. Elected 1994. Resigned 1998 after election as city treasurer.
Tom Ammiano* 1995–2008 Elected 1994, 1998, 2000, and 2004. Resigned 2008 after election to the California State Assembly.
Mabel Teng 1995–2001 Elected 1994 and 1998. Defeated for re-election 2000.
Michael Yaki 1996–2001 Appointed 1996 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Terence Hallinan. Elected 1996. Defeated for re-election 2000.
Amos Brown 1996–2001 Appointed 1996 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Carole Migden. Elected 1998. Defeated for re-election 2000.
Leslie R. Katz 1996–2001 Appointed 1996 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Willie B. Kennedy. Elected 1996. Did not seek re-election in 2000.
Leland Yee 1997–2002 Elected 1996 and 2000. Resigned 2002 after election to the California State Assembly.
José Medina 1997–1999 Elected 1996. Resigned 1999 to accept appointment by Governor Gray Davis as Director of the California Department of Transportation.
Gavin Newsom 1997–2004 Appointed 1997 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Kevin Shelley. Elected 1998, 2000, and 2002. Resigned 2004 after election as mayor.
Mark Leno 1998–2002 Appointed 1998 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Susan Leal. Elected 1998 and 2000. Resigned 2002 after election to the California State Assembly.
Alicia Becerril 1999–2001 Appointed 1999 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor José Medina. Defeated for first election in 2000.
Matt Gonzalez* 2001–2005 Elected 2000. Did not seek re-election in 2004.
Tony Hall 2001–2004 Elected 2000. Resigned 2004 to accept appointment as executive director of the Treasure Island Development Authority.
Sophie Maxwell 2001–2011 Elected 2000, 2002, and 2006. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2010.
Jake McGoldrick 2001–2009 Elected 2000 and 2004. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2008.
Aaron Peskin* 2001–2009 Elected 2000 and 2004. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2008.
Chris Daly 2001–2011 Elected 2000, 2002, and 2006. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2010.
Gerardo Sandoval 2001–2009 Elected 2000 and 2004. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2008.
Bevan Dufty 2002–2011 Elected 2002 and 2006. Appointed post-election 2002 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Mark Leno. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2010.
Fiona Ma 2002–2006 Elected 2002. Appointed post-election 2002 by Mayor Willie Brown to succeed Supervisor Leland Yee. Resigned 2006 after election to the California State Assembly.
Michela Alioto-Pier 2004–2011 Appointed 2004 by Mayor Gavin Newsom to succeed Newsom on the Board of Supervisors. Elected 2004 and 2006. Ruled ineligible by the San Francisco Department of Elections, citing an opinion by City Attorney Dennis Herrera, to seek re-election in 2010. Alioto-Pier filed lawsuit in San Francisco Superior Court asserting that, under the term limits law, she was eligible to seek re-election in 2010, and if re-elected, would be termed out as of the 2014 election instead. A Superior Court judge ruled in her favor,[13] but the California Court of Appeal overturned that ruling, thereby removing her from the 2010 ballot for District 2 supervisor. Alioto-Pier appealed that ruling to the Supreme Court of California[14] which declined to hear the case.[15]
Sean Elsbernd 2004–2013 Appointed 2004 by Mayor Gavin Newsom to succeed Supervisor Tony Hall. Elected 2004 and 2008. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2012.
Ross Mirkarimi 2005–2012 Elected 2004 and 2008. Resigned 2012 after election as sheriff.
Ed Jew 2006–2007 Elected 2006. Appointed post-election 2006 by Mayor Gavin Newsom to succeed Supervisor Fiona Ma. Suspended by Mayor Newsom on September 25, 2007, pending the outcome of a formal process to remove him from the board. A separate civil suit was initiated by the city to remove him as well. Resigned on January 11, 2008, prior to the completion of the removal process and the civil lawsuit, and agreed not to seek public office for five years.[16]
Carmen Chu 2007–2008, 2008–2013 Appointed 2007 by Mayor Gavin Newsom to succeed Supervisor Ed Jew, after his suspension, pending final action by the Board of Supervisors on the question of whether to remove Jew from office. Jew resigned from office 2008, prior to the completion of the removal process, ending Chu's interim term. Under the charter, the seat became vacant[17] upon Jew's resignation and remained vacant for about five and a half hours until a new appointment was made.[17] Appointed 2008 by Mayor Newsom to succeed Supervisor Ed Jew, after his resignation. Elected 2008 to serve out the remainder of Jew's term, which expired January 2011.[17][18][19] Elected 2010. Resigned 2013 to accept appointment as assessor-recorder.
David Campos 2008–present Elected 2008 and 2012. Appointed post-election 2008 by Mayor Gavin Newsom to succeed Supervisor Tom Ammiano. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2016.
Eric Mar 2009–present Elected 2008 and 2012. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2016.
John Avalos 2009–present Elected 2008 and 2012. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2016.
David Chiu* 2009–2014 Elected 2008 and 2012. Resigned 2014 after election to the California State Assembly.
Mark Farrell 2011–present Elected 2010 and 2014. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2018.
Malia Cohen 2011–present Elected 2010 and 2014. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2018.
Scott Wiener 2011–present Elected 2010 and 2014. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2018.
Jane Kim 2011–present Elected 2010 and 2014. Ineligible to seek re-election in 2018.
Christina Olague 2012–2013 Appointed 2012 by Mayor Ed Lee to succeed Supervisor Ross Mirkarimi. Defeated for first election in 2012.
Norman Yee 2013–present Elected 2012.
London Breed 2013–present Elected 2012.
Katy Tang* 2013–present Appointed 2013 by Mayor Ed Lee to succeed Supervisor Carmen Chu. Elected 2013 and 2014.

Members who served as president of the Board of Supervisors during part of their tenure on the board are denoted with an asterisk (*).

Nonpartisanship[edit]

Supervisors are elected on non-partisan ballots, but all current members of the Board of Supervisors are registered Democrats. Supervisor Jane Kim was previously a member of the Green Party, but switched her registration to Democratic before running for supervisor.[20]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Section 3.100. Powers and Responsibilities.". 1996 Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. Municipal Code Corporation. Retrieved July 29, 2009. 
  2. ^ "Section 15.105. Suspension and Removal.". 1996 Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. Municipal Code Corporation. Retrieved July 29, 2009. 
  3. ^ Vega, Cecilia M. (September 26, 2007). "Mayor suspends Ed Jew from board, opening doors to political fight". San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco: Hearst Communications, Inc.). p. A-1. Retrieved July 29, 2009. 
  4. ^ Lagos, Marisa (December 5, 2008). "Crowd cheers swearing in of Supervisor Campos". San Francisco Chronicle (San Francisco: Hearst Communications, Inc.). p. B-1. Retrieved July 28, 2009. 
  5. ^ "Section 2.116. President of the Board of Supervisors.". 1996 Charter of the City and County of San Francisco. Municipal Code Corporation. Retrieved July 29, 2009. 
  6. ^ "Proposition L" (PDF). San Francisco Voter Information Pamphlet: Primary Election, June 8, 1982. San Francisco: San Francisco Registrar of Voters Office. pp. 50–52. Retrieved July 30, 2009. 
  7. ^ "Proposition G" (PDF). San Francisco Voter Information Pamphlet: Consolidated Presidential General Election, November 5, 1996. San Francisco: San Francisco Department of Elections. pp. 153–164. Retrieved July 30, 2009. 
  8. ^ a b c "List of Public Officers of the City and County of San Francisco", San Francisco Municipal Reports for the Fiscal Year 1898-99, Ending June 30, 1899, San Francisco: The Hinton Printing Co., 1899, p. Ap1-640–Ap1-717 
  9. ^ San Francisco Municipal Reports for the Fiscal Year 1886-7, Ending June 30, 1887, San Francisco: William M. Hinton & Co., 1887, p. 436–437 
  10. ^ San Francisco Municipal Reports for the Fiscal Year 1898-99, Ending June 30, 1899, San Francisco: The Hinton Printing Co., 1899, p. 75–76 
  11. ^ Transactions of the California State Agricultural Society During the Year 1892, Sacramento, 1893, p. 142–143 
  12. ^ Hartman, Chester W. and Carnochan, Sarah, "City for Sale: The Transformation of San Francisco" University of California Press (2002), p. 239, ISBN 0-520-08605-8
  13. ^ Gordon, Rachel (July 28, 2010). "Herrera will appeal Alioto-Pier decision". The San Francisco Chronicle. 
  14. ^ Gordon, Rachel (August 25, 2010). "Appeals court rules against Alioto-Pier". The San Francisco Chronicle. 
  15. ^ http://blogs.sfweekly.com/thesnitch/2010/09/michela_alioto-pier_petition_s.php
  16. ^ Ed Jew tenders resignation from S.F. Board of Supervisors, San Francisco Chronicle.
  17. ^ a b c Interim supervisor becomes permanent replacement for Ed Jew, San Francisco Chronicle.
  18. ^ ARTICLE XIII: ELECTIONS
  19. ^ S.F. mayor's finance office aide named interim replacement for Ed Jew, San Francisco Chronicle.
  20. ^ http://www.sfbg.com/2010/03/11/green-partys-nadir

External links[edit]