Meopta

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Meopta - optika, s.r.o.
Industry Optical, opto-mechanical and opto-electronic systems
Founded 1933 as Optikotechna[1]
Founder(s) Dipl. Ing. Alois Beneš and Prof. Alois Mazurek
Headquarters Přerov, Czech Republic
Area served Worldwide
Products Consumer, Industrial & Military applications
Employees 2,400
Subsidiaries Meopta U.S.A., Inc.
Website [1]

Meopta was a Slovak company, later a Czechoslovak national holding company, producing various optical devices. The company was once well known for its still and movie cameras, although it no longer manufactures such products. Meopta was a name first given to C. P. Göerz factory in Bratislava.

Now under this name a Czech privately owned company manufactures sports and military optics, cinema projectors, photo enlargers and other optical products . Meopta is Czech-American global manufacturer of precision optics, specializing in the design, engineering and assembly of complex optical, opto-mechanical and opto-electronic systems. Meopta makes products for the consumer, industrial and military markets.

History[edit]

The company emerged as a fusion of two nationalized producers of optical devices: C. P. Göerz Bratislava and Optikotechna Přerov.

In 1907 Vienna based company C. P. Göerz established its subsidiary in Bratislava for production of optical and mechanical devices. The company first produced military optical products used primarily by the artillery and partially by the navy of the Austria-Hungary military. After the World War I the production plan was shifted towards more civilian products such as movie camers, binoculars, magnifying glasses, compasses, and field-glasses and also some other mechanical devices such as manometers, alarm clocks, speakers, refractometers. The company was renamed to Meopta in 1958. Meopta was nationalized in 1968.

Optikotechna company was founded in 1933 in Přerov, Czechoslovakia. Originally established with the intention of producing a limited range of lenses and condensers, the company rapidly expanded the range of products to include enlargers, composite lenses, binoculars, riflescopes, cameras and slide projectors.

Optikotechna enjoyed a thriving consumer goods business until the company was seized by German forces in 1939. Optikotechna was then forced[citation needed] to immediately cease consumer goods production in order to supply military optical equipment for the German army. From 1939 until the end of the war, the company produced nothing other than military optical equipment that included rangefinders, periscopes, binoculars and riflescopes.

At the close of WWII, the company re-focused its efforts on the design, development and production of new optical products and in 1946, was renamed, Meopta.

With the advent of the Cold War, Meopta's production was once again shifted primarily toward military products. From 1971 until 1989, over 75% of the company's capacity was allocated to the production of military products for the Warsaw Pact countries.

Finally, in 1992, Meopta became a fully independent, private company and started supplying optical components to optical companies across the globe. Over the past 15 years, investments in both infrastructure and personnel have allowed Meopta to evolve into more than just an optics manufacturing company. Today, Meopta is not only one of the suppliers of a wide variety of premium grade, high performance optics products, but also a provider of research, design, engineering, manufacturing and assembly services.

Cameras[edit]

Movie Cameras[edit]

8 mm Cameras

  • OP 8 (1939)
  • Sonet 8 (1956)
  • Admira 8 D (1946–47)
  • Admira 8 IIa (1954)
  • Admira 8 F (1960–64)
  • Admira EL 8 (1960) - one and only camera having the Zoom lens
  • Admira 8 G1 (1966–68)
  • Admira 8 G2 (1966)
  • Admira 8 G0 (1968–73)
  • Admira 8 G1 Supra (1968–71)
  • Admira 8 G2 Supra (1968–71)
  • Admira 8 L1 Supra (1971)
  • Admira 8 L2 Supra (1971)
Supra is an indication for Super 8.

9.5 mm Cameras

  • Admira Ledvinka (Pocket) (1934)

16 mm Cameras

  • Admira 16 (1937)
  • Admira 16 A1 el. (1963–68)

Movie Projectors[edit]

8 mm and 9.5 mm Projectors [3]

  • Scolar (1934)
  • Sonet 8 (1938)
  • OP 8 (1936)
  • Optilux (1945–50)
  • Jubilar 9.5 (1945–50)
  • Atom (1940–45)
  • Meo 8 (1954–60)
  • AM 8 (1960–69)
  • Meocord (1966–67)
  • AM 8 Super (1967–70)
  • Meolux I (1969)
  • Meolux II (1972–77)
  • Meos (1978)
  • Meos Duo (1977–86)
  • KP 8-2 Super (1976–80)

16 mm Projectors [4]

  • OP16 silent and sound (1938)
  • OP 16 (1951)
  • Opefon (1945)
  • Almo 16 (1936)
  • Pictureta (1936)
  • Meopton I (1945–50)
  • Meopton II (1945–50)
  • Meopton IIa (1966)
  • Club 16 (1962–63)
  • Meoclub 16 (1965)
  • Meoclub 16 Automatic (1968)
  • Meoclub 16 Automatic H (1970)
  • Meoclub 16 Standard (1974–78)
  • Meoclub 16 Electronic (1980–84)
  • Meoclub 16 AS 2 (1982–84)
  • Meoclub 16 Electronic 2 (1984)

35 mm Projectors [5]

  • Eta 7 (1947)
  • Meopton III (1955–57)
  • Meopton IV (1959) - IV S with magnetic soundhead
  • UM 70/35 (1963–73)
  • MEO 5X series (1978-?)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Meopta Story". 
  2. ^ "Movie cameras | Meopta". Meoptahistory.com. Retrieved 2013-10-16. 
  3. ^ "Projectors 8 and 9.5 mm | Meopta". Meoptahistory.com. Retrieved 2013-10-16. 
  4. ^ "Projectors 16 mm | Meopta". Meoptahistory.com. Retrieved 2013-10-16. 
  5. ^ "Projectors 35 mm | Meopta". Meoptahistory.com. Retrieved 2013-10-16. 

External links[edit]