Merchantville, New Jersey

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Merchantville, New Jersey
Borough
Borough of Merchantville
Merchantville highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Merchantville highlighted in Camden County. Inset: Location of Camden County in the State of New Jersey.
Census Bureau map of Merchantville, New Jersey
Census Bureau map of Merchantville, New Jersey
Coordinates: 39°57′00″N 75°03′00″W / 39.95012°N 75.05009°W / 39.95012; -75.05009Coordinates: 39°57′00″N 75°03′00″W / 39.95012°N 75.05009°W / 39.95012; -75.05009[1][2]
Country United States
State New Jersey
County Camden
Incorporated March 3, 1874
Government[5]
 • Type Borough
 • Mayor Frank M. North (term ends December 31, 2014)[3]
 • Clerk Denise Brouse[4]
Area[2]
 • Total 0.600 sq mi (1.553 km2)
 • Land 0.600 sq mi (1.553 km2)
 • Water 0.000 sq mi (0.000 km2)  0.00%
Area rank 542nd of 566 in state
31st of 37 in county[2]
Elevation[6] 82 ft (25 m)
Population (2010 Census)[7][8][9]
 • Total 3,821
 • Estimate (2013)[10] 3,806
 • Rank 422nd of 566 in state
27th of 37 in county[11]
 • Density 6,371.3/sq mi (2,460.0/km2)
 • Density rank 75th of 566 in state
6th of 37 in county[11]
Time zone Eastern (EST) (UTC-5)
 • Summer (DST) Eastern (EDT) (UTC-4)
ZIP code 08109[12][13]
Area code(s) 856[14]
FIPS code 3400745510[15][2][16]
GNIS feature ID 0885297[17]
Website www.merchantvillenj.gov

Merchantville is a borough in Camden County, New Jersey, United States. As of the 2010 United States Census, the borough's population was 3,821,[7][8][9] reflecting an increase of 20 (+0.5%) from the 3,801 counted in the 2000 Census, which had in turn declined by 294 (-7.2%) from the 4,095 counted in the 1990 Census.[18]

Merchantville was incorporated as a borough by an act of the New Jersey Legislature on March 3, 1874, from portions of Delaware Township (now Cherry Hill Township) and Stockton Township.[19]

Geography[edit]

Merchantville is located at 39°57′00″N 75°03′00″W / 39.95012°N 75.05009°W / 39.95012; -75.05009 (39.95012,-75.05009). According to the United States Census Bureau, the borough had a total area of 0.600 square miles (1.553 km2), all of which was land.[2][1]

The borough borders Pennsauken Township and Cherry Hill Township.

Demographics[edit]

Historical population
Census Pop.
1880 439
1890 1,225 179.0%
1900 1,608 31.3%
1910 1,996 24.1%
1920 2,749 37.7%
1930 3,592 30.7%
1940 3,679 2.4%
1950 4,183 13.7%
1960 4,075 −2.6%
1970 4,425 8.6%
1980 3,972 −10.2%
1990 4,095 3.1%
2000 3,801 −7.2%
2010 3,821 0.5%
Est. 2013 3,806 [10] −0.4%
Population sources:
1880-2000[20] 1880-1920[21]
1880-1890[22] 1890-1910[23]
1910-1930[24] 1930-1990[25]
2000[26][27] 2010[7][8][9]

Census 2010[edit]

At the 2010 United States Census, there were 3,821 people, 1,574 households, and 966.4 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,371.3 per square mile (2,460.0 /km2). There were 1,688 housing units at an average density of 2,814.6 per square mile (1,086.7 /km2). The racial makeup of the borough was 76.58% (2,926) White, 13.01% (497) Black or African American, 0.37% (14) Native American, 2.28% (87) Asian, 0.05% (2) Pacific Islander, 4.42% (169) from other races, and 3.30% (126) from two or more races. Hispanics or Latinos of any race were 11.62% (444) of the population.[7]

There were 1,574 households, of which 28.5% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 41.7% were married couples living together, 15.1% had a female householder with no husband present, and 38.6% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals, and 12.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.41 and the average family size was 3.09.[7]

In the borough, 22.5% of the population were under the age of 18, 8.3% from 18 to 24, 28.6% from 25 to 44, 27.7% from 45 to 64, and 12.9% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 38.6 years. For every 100 females there were 91.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 88.5 males.[7]

The Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey showed that (in 2010 inflation-adjusted dollars) median household income was $62,358 (with a margin of error of +/- $9,850) and the median family income was $85,909 (+/- $16,985). Males had a median income of $49,926 (+/- $36,924) versus $41,369 (+/- $15,495) for females. The per capita income for the borough was $34,308 (+/- $4,408). About 11.7% of families and 11.1% of the population were below the poverty line, including 23.7% of those under age 18 and 6.0% of those age 65 or over.[28]

Census 2000[edit]

As of the 2000 United States Census[15] there were 3,801 people, 1,524 households, and 946 families residing in the borough. The population density was 6,317.2 people per square mile (2,446.0/km²). There were 1,607 housing units at an average density of 2,670.8 per square mile (1,034.1/km²). The racial makeup of the borough was 85.90% White, 7.42% African American, 0.29% Native American, 2.10% Asian, 2.84% from other races, and 1.45% from two or more races. Hispanic or Latino of any race were 5.47% of the population.[26][27]

There were 1,524 households out of which 32.1% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 45.1% were married couples living together, 12.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 37.9% were non-families. 32.0% of all households were made up of individuals and 11.6% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.48 and the average family size was 3.19.[26][27]

In the borough the population was spread out with 25.7% under the age of 18, 6.8% from 18 to 24, 31.5% from 25 to 44, 22.1% from 45 to 64, and 13.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 37 years. For every 100 females there were 89.1 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.6 males.[26][27]

The median income for a household in the borough was $49,392, and the median income for a family was $60,652. Males had a median income of $43,375 versus $30,771 for females. The per capita income for the borough was $25,589. About 5.8% of families and 6.8% of the population were below the poverty line, including 9.4% of those under age 18 and 3.0% of those age 65 or over.[26][27]

Government[edit]

Local government[edit]

Merchantville is governed under the borough form of New Jersey municipal government. The government consists of a Mayor and a Borough Council comprising six council members, with all positions elected at large. The mayor is elected directly by the voters to a four-year term of office. The Borough Council consists of six members elected to serve three-year terms on a staggered basis, with two seats coming up for election each year.[5]

As of 2014, the Mayor of Merchantville Borough is Frank M. North, whose term of office ends December 31, 2014. Members of the Borough Council are Edward Brennan (2014), Patricia Fields (2014), John Grasso (2015), Anthony Perno (2015), Dan Sperrazza (2016) and Steve Volkert (2016).[29][30]

Federal, state and county representation[edit]

Merchantville is located in the 1st Congressional District[31] and is part of New Jersey's 6th state legislative district.[8][32][33] Prior to the 2011 reapportionment following the 2010 Census, Merchantville had been in the 7th state legislative district.[34]

The seat for New Jersey's First Congressional District is currently vacant, having formerly been represented by Rob Andrews (D, Haddon Heights), who resigned on February 18, 2014.[35] New Jersey is represented in the United States Senate by Cory Booker (D, Newark; took office on October 31, 2013, after winning a special election to fill the seat of Frank Lautenberg)[36][37] and Bob Menendez (D, Paramus).[38][39]

For the 2014-2015 Session, the 6th District of the New Jersey Legislature is represented in the State Senate by James Beach (D, Voorhees Township) and in the General Assembly by Louis Greenwald (D, Voorhees Township) and Pamela Rosen Lampitt (D, Cherry Hill).[40] The Governor of New Jersey is Chris Christie (R, Mendham Township).[41] The Lieutenant Governor of New Jersey is Kim Guadagno (R, Monmouth Beach).[42]

Camden County is governed by a Board of Chosen Freeholders, its seven members chosen at-large in partisan elections to three-year terms office on a staggered basis, with wither two or three seats coming up for election each year.[43] As of 2014, Camden County's Freeholders are Freeholder Director Louis Cappelli, Jr. (Collingswood, term ends December 31, 2014)[44], Freeholder Deputy Director Edward McDonnell (Pennsauken Township, 2016)[45], Michelle Gentek (Gloucester Township, 2015)[46], Ian K. Leonard (Camden, 2015)[47], Scot N. McCray (Camden, 2014)[48], Jeffrey L. Nash (Cherry Hill, 2015)[49] and Carmen Rodriguez (Merchantville, 2016).[50][51][52] Constitutional officers elected countywide are County Clerk Joseph Ripa,[53] Sheriff Charles H. Billingham[54] and Surrogate Patricia Egan "Pat" Jones.[55]

Politics[edit]

As of March 23, 2011, there were a total of 2,610 registered voters in Merchantville, of which 990 (37.9%) were registered as Democrats, 489 (18.7%) were registered as Republicans and 1,129 (43.3%) were registered as Unaffiliated. There were 2 voters registered to other parties.[56]

In the 2008 presidential election, Democrat Barack Obama received 63.8% of the vote here (1,274 cast), ahead of Republican John McCain, who received around 33.4% (667 votes), with 1,998 ballots cast among the borough's 2,533 registered voters, for a turnout of 78.9%.[57] In the 2004 presidential election, Democrat John Kerry received 57.9% of the vote here (1,107 ballots cast), outpolling Republican George W. Bush, who received around 37.2% (711 votes), with 1,912 ballots cast among the borough's 2,461 registered voters, for a turnout percentage of 77.7.[58]

In the 2009 gubernatorial election, Democrat Jon Corzine received 50.1% of the vote here (637 ballots cast), ahead of both Republican Chris Christie with 42.0% (534 votes) and Independent Chris Daggett with 4.5% (57 votes), with 1,271 ballots cast among the borough's 2,609 registered voters, yielding a 48.7% turnout.[59]

Education[edit]

Students in public school for pre-Kindergarten through eighth grade attend the Merchantville School District at Merchantville Elementary School. As of the 2011-12 school year, the district's one school had an enrollment of 365 students and 26.6 classroom teachers (on an FTE basis), for a student–teacher ratio of 13.72:1.[60]

For ninth through twelfth grades, public school students attend Pennsauken High School, as part of a sending/receiving relationship with the Pennsauken Public Schools in Pennsauken Township.[61] The Merchantville district has sought to end the relationship with the Pennsauken school and send its students to Haddon Heights High School.[62]

St. Peter School is an elementary school that was opened in 1927 and operates under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden.[63][64]

Transportation[edit]

Roads and highways[edit]

As of 2010, the borough had a total of 12.84 miles (20.66 km) of roadways, of which 8.32 miles (13.39 km) were maintained by the municipality and 4.52 miles (7.27 km) by Camden County.[65]

Public transportation[edit]

New Jersey Transit offers bus service in the borough on the 404, and 405 and 407 routes to Camden with connecting bus and rail services into Philadelphia.[66][67]

Notable people[edit]

People who were born in, residents of, or otherwise closely associated with Merchantville include:

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "US Gazetteer files: 2010, 2000, and 1990". United States Census Bureau. 2011-02-12. Retrieved 2011-04-23. 
  2. ^ a b c d e Gazetteer of New Jersey Places, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 14, 2013.
  3. ^ 2013 New Jersey Mayors Directory, New Jersey Department of Community Affairs. Accessed May 12, 2013.
  4. ^ Borough Clerk, Borough of Merchantville. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  5. ^ a b 2012 New Jersey Legislative District Data Book, Rutgers University Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy, March 2013, p. 38.
  6. ^ U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Borough of Merchantville, Geographic Names Information System. Accessed March 8, 2013.
  7. ^ a b c d e f DP-1 - Profile of General Population and Housing Characteristics: 2010 for Merchantville borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  8. ^ a b c d Municipalities Grouped by 2011-2020 Legislative Districts, New Jersey Department of State, p. 4. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  9. ^ a b c Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2010 for Merchantville borough, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  10. ^ a b PEPANNRES - Annual Estimates of the Resident Population: April 1, 2010 to July 1, 2013 - 2013 Population Estimates for New Jersey municipalities, United States Census Bureau. Accessed June 16, 2014.
  11. ^ a b GCT-PH1 Population, Housing Units, Area, and Density: 2010 - State -- County Subdivision from the 2010 Census Summary File 1 for New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  12. ^ Look Up a ZIP Code for Merchantville, NJ, United States Postal Service. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  13. ^ Zip Codes, State of New Jersey. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  14. ^ Area Code Lookup - NPA NXX for Hopatcong, NJ, Area-Codes.com. Accessed August 28, 2013.
  15. ^ a b "American FactFinder". United States Census Bureau. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  16. ^ A Cure for the Common Codes: New Jersey, Missouri Census Data Center. Accessed November 26, 2012.
  17. ^ "US Board on Geographic Names". United States Geological Survey. 2007-10-25. Retrieved 2008-01-31. 
  18. ^ Table 7. Population for the Counties and Municipalities in New Jersey: 1990, 2000 and 2010, New Jersey Department of Labor and Workforce Development, February 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  19. ^ Snyder, John P. The Story of New Jersey's Civil Boundaries: 1606-1968, Bureau of Geology and Topography; Trenton, New Jersey; 1969. p. 107. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  20. ^ Barnett, Bob. Population Data for Camden County Municipalities, 1850 - 2000, WestJersey.org, January 6, 2011. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  21. ^ Compendium of censuses 1726-1905: together with the tabulated returns of 1905, New Jersey Department of State, 1906. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  22. ^ Porter, Robert Percival. Preliminary Results as Contained in the Eleventh Census Bulletins: Volume III - 51 to 75, p. 97. United States Census Bureau, 1890. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  23. ^ Thirteenth Census of the United States, 1910: Population by Counties and Minor Civil Divisions, 1910, 1900, 1890, United States Census Bureau, p. 336. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  24. ^ Fifteenth Census of the United States: 1930 - Population Volume I, United States Census Bureau, p. 715. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  25. ^ New Jersey Resident Population by Municipality: 1930 - 1990, Workforce New Jersey Public Information Network, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 2, 2009. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  26. ^ a b c d e Census 2000 Profiles of Demographic / Social / Economic / Housing Characteristics for Merchantville borough, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  27. ^ a b c d e DP-1: Profile of General Demographic Characteristics: 2000 - Census 2000 Summary File 1 (SF 1) 100-Percent Data for Merchantville borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  28. ^ DP03: Selected Economic Characteristics from the 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-Year Estimates for Merchantville borough, Camden County, New Jersey, United States Census Bureau. Accessed October 11, 2012.
  29. ^ Mayor and Council, Borough of Merchantville. Accessed September 2, 2014.
  30. ^ 2014 Municipal Data Sheet, Borough of Merchantville. Accessed September 2, 2014.
  31. ^ Plan Components Report, New Jersey Redistricting Commission, December 23, 2011. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  32. ^ 2012 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  33. ^ Districts by Number for 2011-2020, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  34. ^ 2011 New Jersey Citizen's Guide to Government, p. 61, New Jersey League of Women Voters. Accessed January 6, 2013.
  35. ^ Directory of Representatives: New Jersey, United States House of Representatives. Accessed January 5, 2012.
  36. ^ Cory A. Booker, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  37. ^ Nutt, Amy Ellis (October 31, 2013). "Booker is officially a U.S. senator after being sworn in". NJ.com/Associated Press. Accessed October 31, 2013.
  38. ^ Biography of Bob Menendez, United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013. "He currently lives in North Bergen and has two children, Alicia and Robert."
  39. ^ Senators of the 113th Congress from New Jersey. United States Senate. Accessed November 5, 2013.
  40. ^ Legislative Roster 2014-2015 Session, New Jersey Legislature. Accessed January 21, 2014.
  41. ^ "About the Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  42. ^ "About the Lieutenant Governor". State of New Jersey. Retrieved 2010-01-21. 
  43. ^ What is a Freeholder?, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  44. ^ Louis Cappelli, Jr., Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  45. ^ Edward McDonnell, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  46. ^ Freeholder Michelle Gentek, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  47. ^ Ian K. Leonard, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  48. ^ Scot N. McCray, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  49. ^ Jeffrey L. Nash, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  50. ^ Carmen Rodriguez, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  51. ^ Board of Freeholders, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  52. ^ 2014 County Data Sheet, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  53. ^ County Clerk, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  54. ^ Sheriff, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  55. ^ Surrogate's Court, Camden County, New Jersey. Accessed July 28, 2014.
  56. ^ Voter Registration Summary - Camden, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, March 23, 2011. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  57. ^ 2008 Presidential General Election Results: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 23, 2008. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  58. ^ 2004 Presidential Election: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 13, 2004. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  59. ^ 2009 Governor: Camden County, New Jersey Department of State Division of Elections, December 31, 2009. Accessed October 15, 2012.
  60. ^ District information for Merchantville School District, National Center for Education Statistics. Accessed September 2, 2014.
  61. ^ Florio, Gwen. "Looking beyond the School decision time to make up, officials say, after a decade of fussing", The Philadelphia Inquirer, September 21, 1992. Accessed July 10, 2008. "Ever since its own high school closed in 1972, the Borough of Merchantville has been sending its public school students to Pennsauken High School."
  62. ^ "Expert report on the Termination of the Sending-receiving Agreement Between the Merchantville School District and the Pennsauken Public Schools", Merchantville School District, March 2013. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  63. ^ Camden County Schools, Roman Catholic Diocese of Camden. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  64. ^ About Us, Saint peter School. Accessed October 15, 2013.
  65. ^ Camden County Mileage by Municipality and Jurisdiction, New Jersey Department of Transportation, May 2010. Accessed July 18, 2014.
  66. ^ Camden County Bus/Rail Connections, New Jersey Transit, backed up by the Internet Archive as of May 22, 2009. Accessed December 6, 2011.
  67. ^ South Jersey Transit Guide, Cross County Connection, as of April 1, 2010. Accessed September 2, 2014.
  68. ^ "Besselink Posts 65 for 135 Total to Gain One-Stroke Margin in Azalea Golf; Gajda is second in $20,000 event Besselink gets 8 birdies in gaining lead -- Four Tied for Third Place", The New York Times, March 29, 1964. Accessed November 26, 2007.
  69. ^ Saxon, Wolfgang. "Don Evans, 65, a Playwright Who Focused on Black Lives", The New York Times, October 24, 2003. Accessed December 6, 2011. "Don Evans, a playwright of the African-American experience, about which he also taught at the College of New Jersey for 30 years, died on Oct. 16 at his home in Merchantville, N.J. He was 65."
  70. ^ Shanker, Thom. "Adm. William J. Fallon: An Experienced Naval Officer, and a Diplomat", The New York Times, January 8, 2007. Accessed December 10, 2007. "William Joseph Fallon was born Dec. 30, 1944, in East Orange, N.J., and raised in Merchantville."
  71. ^ Williams, Andre. "AT 50, EX-BUCK GREACEN IS STILL A GYM RAT", The Morning Call, March 20, 1998. Accessed December 6, 2011. "'I was a typical suburban kid,' said the 50-year-old Greacen, who grew up in South New Jersey and attended the now-defunct Merchantville High."
  72. ^ Cusic, Don. Discovering Country Music, p. 62. ABC-CLIO, 2008. ISBN 0313352453. Accessed July 3, 2012. "Sholes was born in Washington, DC, on February 12, 1911, and lived there until he was nine when the family moved to Merchantville, New Jersey. After high school, he attended Rutgers University and continued to work at RCA Victor part time."
  73. ^ Mee, Bob. "Obituary: Jersey Joe Walcott", The Independent, February 28, 1994. Accessed November 19, 2012. "Arnold Raymond Cream (Jersey Joe Walcott), boxer: born Merchantville, New Jersey 31 January 1914; married 1933 (two sons, four daughters); died Camden, New Jersey 26 February 1994."
  74. ^ Staff. "CELEBRATING LIFE OF DR. KING, WITH PHILA. AT CENTER", The Philadelphia Inquirer, January 16, 2001. Accessed December 6, 2011. "Wyatt Tee Walker, Dr. King's former chief of staff. Mr. Walker, a Merchantville native and now pastor of Canaan Baptist Church of Christ in Harlem, hailed Dr. King as 'an authentic American hero'..."

External links[edit]