Merritte W. Ireland

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Merritte Weber Ireland
Merritte Weber Ireland.jpg
Major General Merritte Weber Ireland
Born (1867-05-31)May 31, 1867
Columbia City, Indiana
Died July 5, 1952(1952-07-05) (aged 85)
Washington, D.C.
Allegiance United States United States of America
Service/branch United States Army seal United States Army
Years of service 1891-1931
Rank US-O8 insignia.svg Major General
Commands held Surgeon General of the US Army
Battles/wars Spanish American War
Philippine–American War
Pancho Villa Expedition
World War I
Awards Distinguished Service Medal

Merritte Weber Ireland (May 31, 1867 - July 5, 1952) was the 23rd U.S. Army Surgeon General, serving in that capacity from October 4, 1918 to May 31, 1931,

Ireland was born on May 31, 1867 in Columbia City, Indiana, a town in the upper end of the Wabash Valley in Whitley County, Indiana. His father, Dr. Martin Ireland, was born in Chillicothe, Ohio, and his mother, whose maiden name was Sarah Fellers, came from Waynesboro, Virginia.

He graduated from the Detroit College of Medicine, receiving an M.D. degree in 1890. The following year was spent in Jefferson Medical College where again he earned an M.D. degree in 1891.

A collection of his papers are held at the National Library of Medicine.[1]

Ireland Army Community Hospital, located at Fort Knox, Kentucky, is named in his honor.[2]

Decorations[edit]

Major General Ireland´s ribbon bar:

Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
Bronze star
1st Row Army Distinguished Service Medal
2nd Row Spanish Campaign Medal Philippine Campaign Medal Army of Cuban Occupation Medal Mexican Service Medal
3rd Row World War I Victory Medal with four Battle Clasps Companion of the Order of the Bath (United Kingdom) Commander of the Legion of Honor (France) Grand Cross of the Order of Polonia Restituta (Poland)

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Merritte Weber Ireland Papers 1911-1952". National Library of Medicine. 
  2. ^ "History of Ireland Army Community Hospital". Ireland Army Community Hospital. United States Army. Retrieved 14 June 2014. 

 This article incorporates public domain material from the United States Government document "[1]".