Metasonix

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Metasonix is an American audio equipment manufacturer, founded by Eric Barbour in 1998 and located in Lakeport, California.[1]

Background[edit]

Metasonix S-1000 "Wretch Machine" synthesizer

Until 2000, Barbour worked as an applications engineer for the Russian vacuum tube manufacturer Svetlana Electron Devices.[2][3]He has also been contributing to Glass Audio magazine since 1991.[2] He has been the senior editor of Vacuum Tube Valley magazine since 1995.[4]

Products[edit]

Metasonix produces audio effects and synthesizers, using atypical vintage vacuum tubes; such as special types made for TV sets, FM modulation detector tubes for cheap FM radios, and radio pentodes. Metasonix modules are considered high-end in pricing, consume high power amounts, and create highly-distorted sounds. Metasonix products include the TM-7 Scrotum Smasher,[5] the TM-3 voltage-controlled oscillator,[6] the TM-6 filter,[7] the TX-1 Agonizer,[8][9] the TX-2 Butt Probe,[10] the TS-21 waveshaper,[11] and the S-1000 Wretch Machine.[12]

Metasonix TM7 Ultra-Distortion Scrotum Smasher[edit]

Metasonix TM7 Ultra-Distortion Scrotum Smasher

Metasonix TM7 Ultra-Distortion Scrotum Smasher features intentionally vulgar control options based on distortion and power; Smash, Scrotum, Double Scrotum, Mega Scrotum, and Scrotum Up Ya Ass."[13] Audio Geek said of it, "The TM-7 is basically a mean, angry guitar preamp made of three vacuum tubes. Plus a feedback loop which makes the preamp unstable. There is nothing else like it."[14]

Users[edit]

Metasonix users include Trent Reznor, Robert Rich, U2, Tim Skold, Richard James, Insect Joy,[15] Alec Empire from Atari Teenage Riot, Billy Gibbons, Nikki Sixx, plus famous producers such as Bob Rock and Hans Zimmer.

Reception[edit]

Electronic Musician praised its "colorful approach to design, employing an all-tube audio path in his quest for unusual and sonically extreme products."[16]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Grosse, Darwin (2004) Interview: Eric Barbour of Metasonix Creative Synth (via archive.org)
  2. ^ a b Barbour, Eric (January 4, 1999). The Cool Sound of Tubes. IEEE Spectrum
  3. ^ Associated Press (February 17, 1998). Sound of vacuum tubes gets audiophiles glowing. San Francisco Chronicle
  4. ^ Wheeler, Tom; Richards, Keith (2007). The Soul of Tone: Celebrating 60 Years of Fender Amps, p. 53. Hal Leonard Corporation, ISBN 978-0-634-05613-0
  5. ^ Crews, Eli (August 1, 2008). Quick Pick: Metasonix TM-7 Scrotum Smasher. Electronic Musician, Volume 24, Issues 7-12
  6. ^ Robair, Gino (January 1, 2004). Metasonix TM-3. Electronic Musician
  7. ^ Robair, Gino (October 1, 2006). Metasonix (TM-6 review). Electronic Musician
  8. ^ Robair, Gino (October 1, 2006). Metasonix (TX-1 Agonizer review) Electronic Musician
  9. ^ Anderton, Craig (May 2005). Metasonix TX-1 Agonizer. Keyboard Magazine
  10. ^ Robair, Gino (September 1, 2007). Metasonix TX-2 Butt Probe (review). Electronic Musician
  11. ^ Robair, Gino (November 1, 2000). Metasonix TS-21 Hellfire Modulator (review). Electronic Musician
  12. ^ Robair, Gino (September 1, 2007). Bizarre Hardware. Electronic Musician
  13. ^ "Metasonix Debuts The TM-7 Ultra-Distortion Scrotum Smasher". Synthtopia.com. Retrieved 3 January 2012. 
  14. ^ "Metasonix TM7 Ultra-Distortion Scrotum Smasher". Audio Geek. Retrieved 3 January 2012. 
  15. ^ Garisto, Julie (April 10, 2009). Meet ... Insect Joy. St. Petersburg Times
  16. ^ Electronic Musician. Mix Publications. 2008. p. 92. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 

External links[edit]