Metre per second squared

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

The metre per second squared is the unit of acceleration in the International System of Units (SI). As a derived unit it is composed from the SI base units of length, the metre, and the standard unit of time, the second. Its symbol is written in several forms as m/s2, m·s−2 or m s−2, or less commonly, as m/s/s.

As acceleration, the unit is interpreted physically as change in velocity or speed per time interval, i.e. metre per second per second and is treated as a vector quantity.

Example[edit]

An object experiences a constant acceleration of one metre per second squared (1 m/s2) from a state of rest, when it achieves the speed of 5 m/s after 5 seconds and 10 m/s after 10 seconds.

Related units[edit]

Newton's Second Law states that force equals mass multiplied by acceleration. The unit of force is the newton (N), and mass has the SI unit kilogram (kg). One newton equals one kilogram metre per second squared. Therefore, the unit metre per second squared is equivalent to newton per kilogram, N·kg−1, or N/kg.[1]

Thus, the Earth's gravitational field (near ground level) can be quoted as 9.8 metres per second squared, or the equivalent 9.8 N/kg.

Acceleration can be measured in ratios to gravity, such as g-force, and peak ground acceleration in earthquakes.

Conversions[edit]

Conversions between common units of acceleration
Gal (cm/s2) ft/s2 m/s2 standard gravity (g0)
cm/s2 1 0.0328084 0.01 0.00101972
ft/s2 30.4800 1 0.304800 0.0310810
m/s2 100 3.28084 1 0.101972
g0 980.665 32.1740 9.80665 1

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Kirk, Tim: Physics for the IB Diploma; Standard and Higher Level, Page 61, Oxford University Press, 2003