Metro Broadcasting, Inc. v. FCC

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Metro Broadcasting, Inc. v. FCC
Seal of the United States Supreme Court.svg
Argued March 28, 1990
Decided June 27, 1990
Full case name Metro Broadcasting, Inc. v. Federal Co
Citations 497 U.S. 547 (more)
Subsequent history No. 89-453, 277 U.S. App. D.C. 134, 873 F.2d 347, affirmed and remanded; No. 89-700, 278 U.S. App. D.C. 24, 876 F.2d 902, reversed and remanded.
Holding
The FCC policies do not violate equal protection, since they bear the imprimatur of longstanding congressional support and direction and are substantially related to the achievement of the important governmental objective of broadcast diversity.
Court membership
Case opinions
Majority Brennan, joined by White, Marshall, Blackmun, Stevens
Concurrence Stevens
Dissent O'Connor, joined by Rehnquist, Scalia, Kennedy
Dissent Kennedy, joined by Scalia
Laws applied
U.S. Const. amend. XIV
Overruled by
Adarand Constructors, Inc. v. Peña, 515 U.S. 200 (1995)

Metro Broadcasting, Inc. v. FCC, 497 U.S. 547 (1990), was a case decided by the Supreme Court of the United States that held that intermediate scrutiny should be applied to equal protection challenges to federal statutes using benign racial classifications.[1] The Court distinguished the previous year's decision City of Richmond v. J.A. Croson Company, 488 U.S. 469 (1989), by noting that it applied only to actions by state and local governments.[2] Metro Broadcasting was overruled by Adarand Constructors, Inc. v. Peña, 515 U.S. 200 (1995), which held that strict scrutiny should be applied to federal laws using benign racial classifications.[3]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Varat, J.D. et al. Constitutional Law Cases and Materials, Concise Thirteenth Edition. Foundation Press, NY: 2009, p. 610
  2. ^ Varat, p. 616
  3. ^ Adarand Constructors, Inc. v. Peña, 515 U.S. 200, 227 (1995)

External links[edit]