Metroland (novel)

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Metroland
MetrolandNovel.jpg
First edition
Author Julian Barnes
Country United Kingdom
Language English
Genre Bildungsroman
Publisher Jonathan Cape
Publication date
1980
Media type Print (Hardback & Paperback)
Pages 176 pp
ISBN 0-224-01762-4
OCLC 27013621
823/.914 20
LC Class PR6052.A6657 M47 1980

Metroland is an English novel written by Julian Barnes and published in 1980. Philip Larkin wrote a letter to Barnes saying "that he had much enjoyed it, despite his prejudice against novels with people under the age of 21 in them. He added, gloomily, something like, 'but is that what life's like nowadays?'" Barnes described "this unexpected praise" as "the most gratifying moment of the strange passage of first publication."[1]

Overview[edit]

Metroland is a first person account of Christopher Lloyd and his experiences growing up in the suburbs of London (so-called Metroland), his brief life in Paris as a graduate student and the early years of his subsequent marriage. As adolescents Christopher and his childhood friend Toni had shown contempt for the bourgeois establishment but this lifestyle is one that Christopher ultimately chooses, much to Toni's disappointment, obtaining a secure job in publishing, marrying, buying a house and having a child. Christopher realises that his normal life and somewhat mundane marriage are not perfect, nor are they necessarily more exciting than his time in Paris with his bold French girlfriend Annick, but he does love his wife and is content.

Film adaptation[edit]

Main article: Metroland (1997 film)

In 1997 Metroland was made into a film starring Christian Bale and Emily Watson. The executive producer Andrew Bandall and director Philip Saville needed three songs from the punk era to be included in the live band scenes played by a fictitious group called The Subverts. Danny de Matos and Del Bartle were asked to write the songs to be included in the film. These three particular songs that featured in the film (although not in the Polygram soundtrack) "Amerikka We Hate You", "Destroy the Hoi Polloi" and "You Destiny" were also produced by Danny de Matos.

References[edit]