Mexico women's national football team

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Mexico
Shirt badge/Association crest
Nickname(s) El Tricolor (The Tricolor)
Association Federación Mexicana de Fútbol
(Mexican Football Federation)
Head coach Leonardo Cuéllar
Most caps Juana Lopez (105)
Top scorer Maribel Domínguez (70)
FIFA ranking 25 Steady
Highest FIFA ranking 21 (January 2011)
Lowest FIFA ranking 31 (December 2002)
First colours
Second colours
First international
 Mexico 9–0 Austria 
(Jesolo, Italy; 6 July 1970)
Biggest win
 Mexico 12–2 Malta 
(Bristol, England; 28 June 1997)
 Martinique 0–10 Mexico
(Bridgeview, United States; 18 October 2014)
Biggest defeat
 United States 12–0 Mexico 
(Port-au-Prince, Haiti; 18 April 1991)
World Cup
Appearances 3 (First in 1999)
Best result Group stage
CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup
Appearances 7 (First in 1991)
Best result Runners-up Silver medal icon.svg : (1998), (2010)

The Mexico women's national football team (sometimes referred to as Las Tri) represents Mexico in international women's football competition and is controlled by La Federación Mexicana de Fútbol (Mexico Football Federation). In the 1970s, the team gained popularity, with Mexico finishing 3rd in an unofficial Women's World Cup held in Italy. Also, in 1971, the team hosted an unofficial women's World Cup reaching the final, only to lose to Denmark 3–0. An estimated 110,000 people attended the final at Estadio Azteca that day.[1] The team was formed before the 1999 Women's World Cup and was composed of Mexican and Mexican-American players. The main goal for the team was to qualify for their first World Cup. Since then, the team has developed and is now ranked 24th in the Women's FIFA World Ranking.[2] One of the big advantages the team has compared to all others is that they have had one coach, Leonardo Cuéllar, for the past 14 years, which is rare to see in a national team from Mexico.[3] The team again is re-gaining popularity, as the U-20 team finished in the quarter-finals in the 2010 FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup and a notable 1–0 win over England in which the game was broadcast live in the country. The team was the host for the 2010 CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup, finishing in second place after a shocking 2–1 victory over the United States. The team has a professional league, the Super Liga Femenil de Futbol, which was established partially to raise the popularity of women's football in Mexico.

History[edit]

The first official coach for the Mexico women's national football team was Leonardo Cuéllar. One of his main goals when first establishing the team was to qualify for the 1999 Women's World Cup.[3] The team accomplished this by placing second to the Canadian team in the 1998 CONCACAF Women's Championship. After finding a coach to begin the team, controversy soon began regarding the nationality of the players being recruited. Many people in Mexico argued that Mexican-American girls should not be allowed to play on the team because they were taking a spot away from a full Mexican player. The team captain, Andrea Rodebaugh, argued that the team's main goal was to qualify and said that to them it did not matter who was on the team as long as the team was formed.[4] The national team was formed despite the controversy and consisted of Mexican and Mexican-American players.

Culture and language barriers[edit]

The team has encountered several difficulties since their formation. The players had to learn to play together and become a team despite the different views on the culture between the Mexican-Americans and the Mexicans. At the beginning, the division was apparent: all the Mexicans roomed together and all the Americans roomed together; however, with time the team became more integrated.[4] The culture was also a barrier the team had to overcome. For many Mexican girls, playing soccer in general was not thought of highly in Mexican families because it was referred to as a male sport, so the team did not receive as much support as they would have liked and needed.[3] However, with time their accomplishments were covered by the news and the support grew.[3] Despite there being two dominant languages on the team, the players have managed to overcome the boundary and a lot of the Americans speak better Spanish now and vice versa.[4] At practices both languages are used, but when cameras are on, Spanish is used more so the people from Mexico can understand what is going on.[4]

Kit[edit]

The Mexican national team utilizes a tricolour system, composed of the colors green, white and red. The team's three colors originated from Mexico's national flag, known as the tricolor. Currently the kit being used 2011–2012 is a green jersey for home and a black with gold jersey for away. Sewn on the inside collar of both jerseys is the Mexican saying somos guerreros meaning "we are warriors".

Schedule and recent results[edit]

Date Competition Location Opponent Result
9 September 2013 Friendly RFK Stadium, Washington D.C.  United States 0–7
22 September 2013 Friendly Chatel-St-Denis, Switzerland  China PR 0–1
25 September 2013 Friendly Savilese, Switzerland  Brazil 0–4
24 November 2013 Friendly BC Place, Vancouver  Canada 0–0
13 September 2014 Friendly Rio Tinto Stadium, Utah  United States 0–8
18 September 2014 Friendly Sahlen's Stadium, New York  United States 0–4
16 October 2014 WCQ - Group Stage Sporting Park, Kansas City  Costa Rica 0–1
18 October 2014 WCQ - Group Stage Toyota Park, Bridgeview  Martinique 10–0
21 October 2014 WCQ - Group Stage RFK Stadium, Washington  Jamaica 3–1
24 October 2014 WCQ - Group Stage PPL Park, Chester  United States 0–3
26 October 2014 WCQ - Group Stage PPL Park, Chester  Trinidad and Tobago 4–2

Current squad[edit]

Squad for the 2014 CONCACAF Women's Championship.

Head coach: Leonardo Cuéllar

No. Pos. Player DoB/Age Caps Club
1 1GK Cecilia Santiago (1994-10-19)19 October 1994 (aged 20)
2 2DF Arianna Romero (1992-07-29)29 July 1992 (aged 22)
3 2DF Bianca Sierra (1992-06-25)25 June 1992 (aged 22)
4 2DF Alina Garciamendez (1991-04-16)16 April 1991 (aged 23)
5 2DF Paulina Solís (1996-03-13)13 March 1996 (aged 18)
6 3MF Liliana Mercado (1988-10-22)22 October 1988 (aged 25)
7 3MF Nayeli Rangel (1992-02-28)28 February 1992 (aged 22)
8 3MF Teresa Noyola (1990-04-15)15 April 1990 (aged 24)
9 4FW Charlyn Corral (1991-09-11)11 September 1991 (aged 23)
10 4FW Stephany Mayor (1991-09-23)23 September 1991 (aged 23)
11 4FW Mónica Ocampo (1987-01-04)4 January 1987 (aged 27)
12 1GK Pamela Tajonar (1984-12-02)2 December 1984 (aged 29)
13 2DF Kenti Robles (1991-02-15)15 February 1991 (aged 23)
14 2DF Mónica Alvarado (1991-01-11)11 January 1991 (aged 23)
15 2DF Christina Murillo (1993-01-28)28 January 1993 (aged 21)
16 3MF Karla Nieto (1995-01-09)9 January 1995 (aged 19)
17 4FW Veronica Perez (1988-05-18)18 May 1988 (aged 26)
18 3MF Dinora Garza (1988-01-24)24 January 1988 (aged 26)
19 4FW Tanya Samarzich (1994-12-28)28 December 1994 (aged 19)
20 4FW Luz Duarte (1995-08-29)29 August 1995 (aged 19)

Competitive record[edit]

FIFA World Cup record[edit]

FIFA Women's World Cup record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
China 1991 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Sweden 1995 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
United States 1999 Group stage 16th 3 0 0 3 1 15
United States 2003 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
China 2007 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Germany 2011 Group stage 11th 3 0 2 1 3 7
Canada 2015 Qualified - - - - - - -
Total - 3/7 6 0 2 4 4 22
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Olympic football tournament[edit]

Olympic Games record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
United States 1996 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Australia 2000 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Greece 2004 Quarter-finals 8th 3 0 1 2 1 8
China 2008 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
United Kingdom 2012 Did not qualify - - - - - - -
Total - 1/5 3 0 1 2 1 8

CONCACAF Women's Gold Cup record[edit]

Year Round MP W D* L GF GA
Haiti 1991 Group stage 3 1 0 2 9 16
United States 1993 Did not enter - - - - - -
Canada 1994 Third place 4 1 1 2 6 19
Canada 1998 Runners-up 5 3 1 1 20 6
United States 2000 Group stage 3 1 0 2 10 7
United StatesCanada 2002 Third place 5 3 0 2 11 7
United States 2006 Third place 3 2 0 1 6 2
Mexico 2010 Runners-up 5 3 0 2 11 7
United States 2014 Third place 5 3 0 2 17 7
Total - 33 17 2 14 90 71
*Draws include knockout matches decided on penalty kicks.

Pan American Games record[edit]

Pan American Games record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA
Canada 1999 Final 2nd 6 3 1 2 15 9
Dominican Republic 2003 Semi-finals 3rd 4 3 0 1 10 5
Brazil 2007 Semi-finals 4th 5 3 0 2 6 1
Mexico 2011 Semi-finals 3rd 5 2 2 1 3 2
Total - 4/4 20 11 3 6 34 17

U-20 World Cup record[edit]

FIFA U-20 Women's World Cup record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA Pts
Canada 2002 Group stage 11th 3 0 0 3 5 10 -
Thailand 2004 Did not qualify - - - - - - - -
Russia 2006 Group stage 12th 3 1 0 2 5 15 3
Chile 2008 Group stage 15th 3 0 0 3 2 12 -
Germany 2010 Quarter-finals 8th 4 1 2 1 6 7 5
Japan 2012 Quarter-finals 6th 4 2 0 2 7 5 6
Canada 2014 TBD - - - - - - - -
Total - 5/7 17 4 2 11 25 49 14

U-17 World Cup record[edit]

FIFA U-17 Women's World Cup record
Year Round Position MP W D* L GF GA Pts
New Zealand 2008 Did not qualify - - - - - - - -
Trinidad and Tobago 2010 Group stage 13th 3 1 0 2 5 13 3
Azerbaijan 2012 Group stage 12th 3 1 0 2 1 10 3
Costa Rica 2014 Quater Finals 12th 4 2 0 2 8 5 6
Total - 2/4 10 4 0 14 28 12

Overall official record[edit]

Competition Stage Result Opponent Position Scorers
Haiti 1991 CONCACAF Tournament First stage 0–12 United States United States
1–3 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago
8–1 Martinique Martinique 3 / 4
Canada 1994 CONCACAF Tournament Round robin stage 0–9 United States United States
0–6 Canada Canada
3–1 Jamaica Jamaica
3–3 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago 3 / 5
Canada 1998 CONCACAF Tournament First stage 3–2 Costa Rica Costa Rica
7–1 Haiti Haiti
2–2 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago 1 / 4
Semifinals 8–0 Guatemala Guatemala
Final 0–1 Canada Canada
United States 1999 World Cup First stage 1–7 Brazil Brazil Domínguez
0–6 Germany Germany
0–2 Italy Italy 4 / 4
Canada 1999 Pan American Games First stage 1–1 United States United States
2–3 Canada Canada
5–1 Costa Rica Costa Rica
5–1 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago 3 / 5
Semifinals 2–2 (PSO: 5–3) Canada Canada
Final 0–1 United States United States
United States 2000 Gold Cup First stage 3–4 Canada Canada Domínguez 2, Mora
7–0 Guatemala Guatemala Mora 4, Domínguez 3
0–3 China China 3 / 4
United States 2002 Gold Cup First stage 0–3 United States United States
5–1 Panama Panama Gómez 2, Domínguez, Leyva, Sandoval
2–0 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago 2 / 4 Gerardo 2
Semifinals 0–2 Canada Canada
Third place match 4–1 Costa Rica Costa Rica Domínguez 2, González, Mora
Dominican Republic 2003 Pan American Games First stage 1–0 Costa Rica Costa Rica Worbis
3–1 Argentina Argentina Mora, Rosales, Worbis
Semifinals 2–3 Canada Canada Leyva, Mora
Third place match 4–1 Argentina Argentina Leyva, Mora, Moreno, Rosales
Greece 2004 Summer Olympics First stage 1–1 China China Domínguez
0–2 Germany Germany 2 / 3
Quarterfinals 0–5 Brazil Brazil
United States 2006 Gold Cup First round 3–0 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez, González, P. Pérez
Semifinals 0–2 United States United States
Third place match 3–0 Jamaica Jamaica Ocampo 2, Domínguez
2007 World Cup qualification AFC-CONCACAF play-off 0–2 2–1 Japan Japan Domínguez, Leyva
Brazil 2007 Pan American Games First stage 5–0 Paraguay Paraguay Corral 2, Ocampo 2, Valdez
0–1 Argentina Argentina
2–0 Panama Panama Worbis
3–2 United States United States López 2, Worbis
Semifinals 0–2 Brazil Brazil
Third place match 1–2 Canada Canada Worbis
2008 Summer Olympics qualification First stage 8–1 Jamaica Jamaica López 4, Morales 2, Ocampo, Worbis
1–3 United States United States 2 / 3 Worbis
Semifinals 0–1 Canada Canada
Mexico 2010 Gold Cup First stage 7–2 Guyana Guyana Domínguez 4, Garza, Worbis
2–0 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez, López
0–3 Canada Canada 2 / 4
Semifinals 2–1 United States United States Domínguez, V. Pérez
Final 0–1 Canada Canada
Germany 2011 World Cup First stage 1–1 England England Ocampo
0–4 Japan Japan
2–2 New Zealand New Zealand 3 / 4 Domínguez, Mayor
Mexico 2011 Pan American Games First stage 0–0 Chile Chile
1–1 Trinidad and Tobago Trinidad and Tobago Domínguez
1–0 Colombia Colombia 2 / 4 V. Pérez
Semifinals 0–1 Brazil Brazil
Third place match 1–0 Colombia Colombia Ruiz
2012 Summer Olympics qualification First stage 5–0 Guatemala Guatemala Domínguez 3, Diaz, Garza
7–0 Dominican Republic Dominican Republic Guajardo 3, Diaz, Ruiz, Saucedo
0–4 United States United States 2 / 4
Semifinals 1–3 Canada Canada V. Pérez

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Mundial (Women) 1971". Rsssf.com. Retrieved 29 June 2010. 
  2. ^ "Women's World Ranking". Retrieved 1 June 2012. 
  3. ^ a b c d Lewis, Michael (21 January 2012). "Mexico's Leonardo Cuellar Has Turned 'Las Tri' into a Global Power". Fox News Latino. Retrieved 26 January 2012. 
  4. ^ a b c d Jenson, Mike (17 June 1999). "Mexican Soccer Team Has American Accent Half Of The Improbable Women's World Cup Squad Comes From North Of The Border". The Inquirer. Retrieved 5 February 2012. 

External links[edit]