Meyer Abovitz

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Meyer Abovitz (מאיר בן ישעיהו אבוביץ; alternate spelling Meir Abowitz; born 1876 - died 1941) was a Rabbi and Rosh Yeshiva active in Mizrachi in Eastern Europe between the Two World Wars.[1]

Biography[edit]

He studied in Slabodka, Kovno and Radin, and received Semicha (ordination) from Rabbis Moshe Danishevsky, Hirsh Rabinovich, and Malkiel Tannenbaum, respectively holding the positions of Av Beit Din in Slabodka, Kovno and Lomza.[2] He was married to Chana nee Malach; their daughter Rachel Fiege ("Fanny") was married to Rabbi Simcha Wasserman.[3][4]

Rabbi Abovitz was Av Beit Din and Rav in Telatycze, White Russia and then Lubiezh (Lubcza). The latter was destroyed during the early days of the First World War, and he then relocated to German held Navahrudak, where he headed the Bet Yosef Yeshiva; [5] see Novardok Yeshiva. The Rav there was Meyer Meyerovitz.

Rabbi Abovitz participated in the founding assembly of Mizrachi of Lithuania and Poland, in Vilna, 1919; he was involved in various committees of the movement in Poland between the two World Wars. See Mizrachi in Poland. He was also active in "religious national education"[2] which he saw a counterweight to the Jewish secular schools founded in Navahrudak following the First World War. Despite his involvement with Mizrachi he was also accepted by the Agudath Yisrael.

Navahrudak was occupied by Nazi Germany in July 1941, and Rabbi Abovitz was martyred with the rest of the Jewish population;[6] see Navahrudak: Later history.

Works[edit]

He authored the following works: [7][8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Pinkas Hakehillot Polin: Novogrudok". Jewishgen.org. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  2. ^ a b "אנציקלופדיה יהודית דעת - אבוביץ מאיר". Daat.ac.il. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  3. ^ "Gedolim Yahrtzeits::Cheshvan". Chinuch.org. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  4. ^ Eilat Gordin Levitan. "Rabbi Elchonon Wasserman". Eilatgordinlevitan.com. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  5. ^ "Yad Vashem Studies - Google Books". Books.google.com. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  6. ^ "רבנים שנספו בשואה: אבוביץ, חיים - אבלוב, יעקב". Horabis.blogspot.com. 2004-02-27. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 
  7. ^ worldcat.org citation
  8. ^ "אבוביץ מאיר בן ישעיהו מופיע בביבליוגרפיה של הספר העברי". Hebrew Bibliography. Retrieved 2013-02-18. 

External links and references[edit]

  • Abovitz, Meyer (Hebrew), אנציקלופדיה יהודית
  • Other references cited there: אנציקלופדיה של הציונות הדתית, א, עמ 2-1; ספר הציונות הדתית, ב, עמ 499