Meyers, California

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search

Coordinates: 38°51′22″N 120°00′47″W / 38.85611°N 120.01306°W / 38.85611; -120.01306

Meyers
Unincorporated community
Meyers along U.S. Route 50 in a map of El Dorado County
Meyers along U.S. Route 50 in a map of El Dorado County
Meyers is located in California
Meyers
Meyers
Location in California
Coordinates: 38°51′22″N 120°00′47″W / 38.85611°N 120.01306°W / 38.85611; -120.01306
Country United States
State California
County El Dorado
Elevation[1] 6,352 ft (1,936 m)
Population
 • Total 3,000
Time zone Pacific (PST) (UTC-8)
 • Summer (DST) PDT (UTC-7)
ZIP code 96150
Area code(s) 530
Official name: Yank's Station[2]
Reference No. 708

Meyers (also Yanks, Yank's Station, and Tahoe Paradise)[3] is a small unincorporated community in El Dorado County, California, United States,[1] along U.S. Route 50 in the northern Sierra Nevada mountains south of South Lake Tahoe in the Lake Tahoe area. It lies at an elevation of 6352 feet (1936 m). Established in 1851, Meyers started out as a stagecoach stop, trading post and Pony Express station.[1] The town is now registered as California Historical Landmark #708.[2] It serves as a popular stop on the way into and out of the Tahoe Basin for travelers on Highways 50 and 89.

History[edit]

Martin Smith was the town's founder; he opened a trading post and inn on the Placerville-Carson Road in 1851 [3] In 1859, Ephraim "Yank" Clement and his wife Lydia purchased the station and outbuildings from George Douglas and Martin Smith, who had ran the station as a hostelry and stagecoach stop. The Clements enlarged the station into a three-story, fourteen-room way station which included a large stable and hay barn with large corrals across the road.[3][4] The station served as a Pony Express stop up until October 26, 1861. Upon completion of the wagon road over Kingsberry Grade, the Pony Express route continued along the south shore of Lake Tahoe stopping at Yank's Station Toll House, near Myers (original spelling) on U.S. 50. Warren Upson was the first Pony Express rider to arrive here on April 28, 1860. The station also served as a stage stop with a trading post and hotel. The toll house was pushed off its foundation by flood waters and is currently located on blocks adjacent to the Tahoe Paradise Museum. In 1873 George Henry Dudley Meyers bought the property. Business flourished at the newly rebuilt station for decades; it continued to serve as a hotel and store until November 25, 1938, when the building was destroyed by fire during the Meyers town fire. A post office opened in 1904 south of the station.[3] The post office closed in 1957, and reopened in 1958.[3] It was renamed Tahoe Paradise in 1962.[3] Since then, houses have been built sporadically in the meandering neighborhoods that surround it.

Amenities[edit]

Meyers is currently home to one grocery store, Lira's, a hardware shop and lumber yard, Meeks, and multiple other restaurants and shops. There is a California Highway Patrol station near the south end, along with an Insect Inspection Station, and a Post Office. The nearest major city center is 5 miles to the north along U.S. Highway 50 at an intersection that is known locally as "The Y" in South Lake Tahoe proper.

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ a b c U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System: Meyers, California
  2. ^ a b "Yank's Station". Office of Historic Preservation, California State Parks. Retrieved 2012-10-07. 
  3. ^ a b c d e f Durham, David L. (1998). California's Geographic Names: A Gazetteer of Historic and Modern Names of the State. Quill Driver Books. p. 522. ISBN 9781884995149. 
  4. ^ "DIVSIION FIVE: STATIONS BETWEEN ROBERTS CREEK AND SACRAMENTO/SAN FRANCISCO, Yank's Station". Ormsby.org. Retrieved 23 March 2011.