List of Alamo defenders

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The March 24, 1836 edition of the Telegraph contained the first list of defenders killed at the Battle of the Alamo.  This is a partial scan of that list.

People who are believed to have participated in the Battle of the Alamo, February 23 – March 6, 1836, on the Texan side, are listed here. The first report of the names of the Texian victims of the battle came in the March 24, 1836 issue of the Telegraph and Texas Register. The 115 names on that list were supplied by couriers John Smith and Gerald Navan.[1]

Defenders[edit]

Name Rank Company Birthdate Birthplace Status Notes
Juan Abamillo Sergeant Seguin's cavalry company unknown Texas killed in battle Also served in the siege of Bexar[2]
James L. Allen Private unknown January 2, 1815 Kentucky survived Last courier to leave the Alamo (March 5); died April 25, 1901.[2]
Robert Allen Private Forsyth's company unknown Virginia killed in battle[3]
Horace Arlington Alsbury Private Garrison translator, courier 1805 Kentucky survived First courier sent out by Travis[4] Juana Navarro Alsbury's husband, member of the Texian army, fought at Siege of Bexar, left for Gonzales immediately after Juana moved into the Alamo to warn the colonists that the Mexican Army was just outside of Béxar[5]
George Andrews possibly aka George Anderson, Quartermaster New Orleans Greys killed in battle Andrews is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1836 Captain Thomas Breece compiled a list of the men who had originally been under his command, and marked Andrews as killed at the Alamo.[6]
Miles DeForest Andross Private Blazeby's infantry company 1809 Bradford, Vermont killed in battle[7] fought at Bexar, remained with Neill
Micajah Autry Private Harrison's company (Volunteer Auxiliary Corps) 1794 Sampson County, North Carolina killed in battle[8]
Juan A. Badillo Sergeant Seguin's cavalry Company unknown Texas killed in battle Served at siege of Bexar[9]
Peter James Bailey III Private Harrison's company (VAC) 1812 Springfield, Kentucky killed in battle[9] Bailey County, Texas, is named for him
Isaac G. Baker Private Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers September 15, 1814 Arkansas killed in battle[10] rode in as a member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32")
William Charles M. Baker Captain unknown Missouri killed in battle[11]
John J. Ballentine Private Carey's artillery company Pennsylvania killed in battle[12]
Richard W. Ballentine Private unknown 1814 Scotland killed in battle[13]
John J. Baugh Captain, Greys commander at Alamo until becoming garrison adjutant (staff officer) unknown 1803 Virginia killed in battle[14]
Joseph Bayliss Private Harrison's company (VAC) 1808 Tennessee killed in battle[14] James Lemonn
John Walker Baylor, Jr. Private Dimitt's company December 1813 Stone Creek, Kentucky survived left Alamo as a courier, probably February 25. Joined Fannin at Goliad and escaped with Horton's guard, then joined Houston. Died September 3, 1836, from complications of wounds suffered at the Battle of San Jacinto[15]
John Blair Private unknown 1803 Tennessee killed in battle[16]
Samuel Blair Captain, assistant to ordnance chief Ordnance Department 1807 Tennessee killed in battle[17]
William Blazeby Captain Commanding officer of Greys infantry company after Baugh 1795 England killed in battle[17]
James Bonham Second Lieutenant rode in with Bowie February 20, 1807 Edgefield County, South Carolina killed in battle[18] February 16 courier to Goliad & Gonzales, returned to San Antonio March 3
Daniel Bourne Private Carey's artillery company 1810 England killed in battle[19]
James Bowie Colonel Commander of volunteers, co-commander of the garrison c. 1796

Logan County, Kentucky

killed in battle fought at Bexar, knife design named for him, fell ill while commanding[20][21]
Jesse B. Bowman Private unknown 1785 Tennessee According to most lists, Bowman was killed at the Alamo.[22] Historian Thomas Ricks Lindley states that Bowman's name did appear on the first monument to Alamo defenders (which was destroyed in 1881), but no other records have been located to verify his service in San Antonio. A land contract dated February 13, 1836 appears to place Bowman in Copper County, TX, instead of at the Alamo; his family believes the contract was forged.[23]
George Brown Private unknown 1801 England killed in battle Gonzales resident[24]
James Brown Private unknown 1800 Pennsylvania killed in battle DeLeon Colony, Tx. resident, fought at Bexar[24]
Robert Brown Private unknown c. 1818 survived Left as a courier after February 25, sallied to burn the jacales[25]
James Buchanan Private unknown,marksman 1813 killed in battle resident of Austin's Colony[26]
Samuel E. Burns Private Carey's artillery company 1810 Ireland killed in battle[26]
George D. Butler Private unknown 1813 Missouri killed in battle[26]
John Cain Private Carey's artillery company 1802 Pennsylvania killed in battle[27] rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers
Robert Campbell Lieutenant Harrison's company (VAC) 1810 Tennessee killed in battle[27]
William R. Carey Captain Commanding officer of his own artillery company "The Invincibles" 1806 Virginia killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo, had commanded the Alamo while James C. Neill commanded Bexar,[27]
Charles Henry Clark Private New Orleans Greys, under Breece killed in battle[28]
M.B. Clark Private probably Baker's company killed in battle[29]
Daniel W. Cloud Private Harrison's company February 20, 1812 Lexington, Kentucky killed in battle[29]
Robert E. Cochran Private Carey's company 1810 Merrimack County, Pembroke, New Hampshire killed in battle[29] Cochran County, Texas is named for him.[30]
George Washington "Wash" Cottle Gonzales Ranging Company 1811 Hurricane Township, Lincoln County, Missouri killed in battle rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers, his brother-in-law, Thomas J. Jackson, also died at the Alamo.[30]
Henry Courtman Private New Orleans Greys under Breece 1808 Germany killed in battle[30]
Lemuel Crawford Private Carey's company 1814 South Carolina killed in battle[31]
David Crockett Colonel Harrison's company, fought near chapel & palisade August 17, 1786 Greene County, Tennessee killed in battle[31] Alamo co-commander Travis praised Crockett for his actions during the siege, writing, "The Hon. David Crockett was seen at all points, animating the men to do their duty."[32] sallied out late on March 3 to find Fannin, while carrying Alamo's March 3 letters, returned without finding Fannin[33]
Robert Crossman Private Blazeby 1810 Pennsylvania killed in battle[34]
Antonio Cruz y Arocha Private Seguin's cavalry unknown Mexico survived Left Alamo with Juan Seguin as a courier on February 25.[34] He later served at the Battle of San Jacinto.[35]
David P. Cummins Private Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1809 Lewiston, Pennsylvania killed in battle rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers, his cousin-in-law, John Purdy Reynolds, also died at the Alamo.[35]
Robert Cunningham Private Carey's company October 18, 1804 Ontario County, New York killed in battle[35][36]
Jacob C. Darst Lieutenant Gonzales Mounted Rangers December 22, 1793 Woodford County, Kentucky killed in battle In September 1835 Darst was one of the "Old Eighteen" who refused to relinquish a cannon, leading to the Battle of Gonzales, rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32")[37]
John Davis Private Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1811 Kentucky killed in battle[37] rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32")
Freeman H.K. Day Private White's infantry company 1806 killed in battle fought in the Siege of Bexar[37]
Jerry C. Day Private[38] unknown 1816[37] Missouri killed in battle[38]
Squire Daymon Private Carey 1808 Tennessee killed in battle fought in the Siege of Bexar and was then garrisoned at the Alamo until sometime in February 1836. He rejoined the Alamo garrison on March 1, 1836, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[38]
William Dearduff Private rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers c. 1811 Tennessee killed in battle Entered the Alamo on March 1, 1836. Brother-in-law of defender James George.[38]
Alexandro de la Garza Private Seguins company Texas survived Fought at siege of Bexar. Left Alamo as a courier.[38]
Stephen Dennison Private Blazeby 1812 England or Ireland killed in battle Was originally a member of Breece's New Orleans Grays[39]
Francis L. Desauque Captain Dimmitt Philadelphia, Pennsylvania survived Left to get supplies for the garrison about February 22, 1836. On learning of the siege, he joined Fannin at Goliad, was captured at the Battle of Coleto and executed in the Goliad Massacre.[39][40]
Charles Despallier Private Rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1812 Louisiana killed in battle (1815-1836) was one of the 91 who signed the Goliad Declaration of Independence of Dec. 20, 1835[41] Was cited by Travis for bravery.[40] Left the Alamo as a courier during the siege but returned on March 1.[42] His older brother Blaz Philipe Despallier took part in the siege of Bexar [41]
Lewis Dewall Private White 1812 Manhattan, New York killed in battle[42]
Almaron Dickinson Captain Artillery officer 1810 Tennessee killed in battle[42] He was one of the Old Eighteen who refused to relinquish a cannon, leading to the Battle of Gonzales. He operated the cannon during the battle.[43]
James Dickson New Orleans Greys killed in battle Dickson is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1836 Captain Thomas Breece compiled a list of the men who had originally been under his command, and marked Dickson as killed at the Alamo.[6]
John Henry Dillard Private unknown 1805 Smith County, Tennessee killed in battle[44]
Philip Dimmitt Captain Dimmitt 1801 Kentucky survived Dimmitt was previously the commander of Texian forces at Presidio La Bahia in Goliad. He left the Alamo on February 23 to gather reinforcements. He was captured by a Mexican raiding party in 1841 and committed suicide on July 8 of that year after being threatened with execution.[45][46]
James R. Dimpkins Sergeant Blazeby England killed in battle Originally a member of Breece's New Orleans Grays.[47]
Andrew Duvalt Private White 1804 Ireland killed in battle Fought in the Siege of Bexar and then was part of the Texian garrison at the Alamo. Left the Alamo sometime in February, and returned after February 23.[48]
Carlos Espalier Private unknown, but possible Bowie 1819 San Antonio de Bexar, Texas killed in battle possibly the same person as Charles Despallier. They were at least second cousins.[41][48]
José Gregorio Esparza Private Seguins company February 25, 1802 San Antonio de Béxar, Texas killed in battle[49] His was the only body of a Texian to be buried, after his brother Francisco received special permission from Santa Anna. The other bodies were burned.[50]
Robert Evans Major; Master of Ordnance unknown 1800 Ireland[51] killed in battle Killed in the Alamo Chapel before he could blow up the powder magazine[52]
Samuel B. Evans Private unknown January 16, 1812 Jefferson County, New York killed in battle[53]
James L. Ewing Private Carey 1812 Tennessee killed in battle secretary to James C. Neill and possibly to Travis when he became commander.[53]
William Keener Faunterloy Private Harrison[54] 1814 Logan County, Kentucky[53] killed in battle[54]
William Fishbaugh Private Gonzales Ranging Company unknown Alabama? killed in battle Entered the Alamo on March 1,rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32")[54]
John Flanders Private Gonzales Ranging Company 1800 New Hampshire killed in battle Entered Alamo on March 1, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[54]
Salvador Flores Captain Artillery officer (under Neill) 1806 Floresville, Texas survived Flores is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1835 he recruited men and joined under Juan Seguin.[55] Fought at Bexar,[56] Stayed at the Alamo with Neill, left after February 25,[57] Lead rear guard protecting Texian families, later in 1842 Captain against Woll's army
Dolphin Ward Floyd Private Gonzales Ranging Company March 6, 1804 Nash County, North Carolina killed in battle Entered the Alamo on March 1, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers, Floyd County, Texas is named for him.[58]
John Hubbard Forsyth Captain Forsyth August 10, 1797 Avon, New York killed in battle He went to Texas with a volunteer cavalry company from Kentucky and eventually arrived at the Alamo along with William Travis' group.[58]
Antonio Fuentes Private Seguins company 1813 San Antonio de Bexar, Texas killed in battle Fuentes was jailed in February for theft. When Bowie was elected commander of the Alamo shortly after, Bowie became very drunk and freed Fuentes. Although Fuentes was ordered back to jail afterwards, the action angered many and was partially responsible for the decision for Bowie and Travis to share command.[59]
Galba Fuqua Private Gonzales Ranging Company March 9, 1819 Alabama killed in battle Entered the Alamo on March 1. Original member of Gonzales Ranging Company. According to Susana Dickinson, Fuqua tried to give her a message during the battle, but his jaw had been broken and she could not understand him.[59]
William Garnett Private unknown 1812 Virginia killed in battle[60]
James W. Garrand Private Blazeby 1813 Louisiana killed in battle Took part in the Siege of Bexar.[60]
James Girard Garrett Private Blazeby 1806 Tennessee killed in battle[60] Originally a member of Breece's New Orleans Grays. Participated in the Siege of Bexar.[61]
John E. Garvin Private Carey 1809 killed in battle Entered the Alamo on March 1, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[61]
John E. Gaston Private Gonzales Ranging Company 1819 killed in battle Entered the Alamo on March 1,rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[61]
James George Private Gonzales Ranging Company 1802 killed in battle brother-in-law of Alamo defender William Deardruff.[61] Entered the Alamo on March 1, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[62]
John C. Goodrich Cornet Blazeby or Forsyth 1809 Virginia killed in battle[62] his brother signed the Texas Declaration of Independence on March 2.[63]
Albert Calvin Grimes Private Forsyth (possibly) December 20, 1817 Georgia killed in battle His father, Jesse Grimes, signed the Texas Declaration of Independence on March 2.[63]
Brigido Guerrero Private Bowies company unknown Tallenango, Mexico survived Guerrero was a soldier in the Mexican Army and deserted to join the Texians when war broke out.[63] He fought in both the Battle of Concepcion and the Siege of Bexar. Near the end of the battle of the Alamo, he joined the women in the chapel. He convinced Mexican soldiers that he was a prisoner-of-war and was spared.[64]
James C. Gwin Private
aka Gwynne
Carey 1804 England killed in battle Participated in the Siege of Bexar.[64] Possibly Joseph C. Gwin, from WV (formerly Ky).[10]
James Hannum Private unknown[65] August 8, 1815 Pennsylvania[64] killed in battle[65]
John Harris Private Gonzales Ranging Company 1813 Kentucky killed in battle Participated in Siege of Bexar. Original member of Gonzales Ranging Company, entered the Alamo on March 1.[65]
Andrew Jackson Harrison Private unknown 1809 Tennessee killed in battle[65]
I.L.K. Harrison unknown Harrison's company (VAC) unknown killed in battle Harrison is not included on most lists of Alamo defenders. Lindley believes he should be included however. Neill signed an affidavit in 1838 swearing that when he left the Alamo on February 14 Harrison was a member of the garrison, and to his knowledge Harrison remained with the garrison and was killed in the battle.[66]
William B. Harrison Captain Harrison 1811 Ohio killed in battle He formed a company, known as the Tennessee Mounted Volunteers, in Nacogdoches, Texas on January 14, 1836. The company reached the Alamo on February 23. During the siege, his company defended the wooden palisade stretching between the Alamo chapel and the Low Barracks.[67]
Joseph M. Hawkins Private Baker (possibly) 1799 Ireland killed in battle[67]
John M. Hays Private Baker (possibly) 1814 Nashville, Tennessee killed in battle He was nominated as a delegate to represent the Alamo garrison at the Convention of 1836 but was not elected.[68]
Charles M. Heiskell Private unknown 1813 Tennessee (possibly) killed in battle entered the Alamo with James Bowie[68]
Patrick Henry Herndon Private Baker (possibly) March 1802 Virginia killed in battle[68] May have accompanied Bowie to the Alamo.[69]
William Daniel Hersee Sergeant Carey 1805 England killed in battle Wounded at the Siege of Bexar.[69]
Benjamin Franklin Highsmith Private unknown September 11, 1817 St. Charles District, Missouri Territory survived[69] Participated in the battles of Velasco, Gonzales, Concepcion, and Bexar and the Grass Fight.[70] Left as a courier on February 18, when he was sent with a plea for aid to Col. James W. Fannin, Jr., at Goliad.[71] Although he attempted to return to the garrison on March 5, he was chased away by Mexican soldiers.[45][69] After the battle, he carried the message from Sam Houston to James Fannin ordering Fannin to abandon Goliad. Highsmith fought in the Battle of San Jacinto, which ended the Texas Revolution, and then served in the Mexican-American War, where he was wounded. He died November 20, 1905.[70]
Tapley Holland Private Carey 1810 Ohio killed in battle[70] His family were among the Old Three Hundred, the original colonists in Texas. Participated in the siege of Bexar.[72]
James Holloway New Orleans Greys killed in battle Holloway is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1836 Captain Thomas Breece compiled a list of the men who had originally been under his command, and marked Holloway as killed at the Alamo.[6]
Samuel Holloway Private Blazeby 1808 Pennsylvania killed in battle Participated in the siege of Bexar and remained as part of the garrison[72]
William D. Howell Surgeon (possibly) Blazeby 1791 Massachusetts killed in battle Originally a member of Breece's New Orleans Grays. Participated in the siege of Bexar and remained as part of the garrison.[72]
Thomas P. Hutchinson New Orleans Greys killed in battle Hutchinson is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1836 Captain Thomas Breece compiled a list of the men who had originally been under his command, and marked Hutchinson as killed at the Alamo.[6]
Thomas Jackson Private Gonzales Ranging Company Ireland killed in battle One of the Old Eighteen who refused to relinquish a cannon, leading to the Battle of Gonzales. Brother-in-law of Alamo defender George Cottle. Entered the Alamo on March 1, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers.[73]
William Daniel Jackson Private Carey 1807 Kentucky killed in battle Participated in siege of Bexar.[73]
Green B. Jameson Major Staff officer 1807 Kentucky killed in battle[73] His grandfather, John Jameson was a lieutenant governor of Virginia. Green Jameson participated in the siege of Bexar. When the Mexican troops surrendered the Alamo, Jameson became the chief engineer and was in charge of revamping the fortifications. On the first day of the siege, Bowie sent Jameson as a messenger to speak with representatives of the Mexican army.[74]
Gordon C. Jennings Corporal Carey 1780 Pennsylvania killed in battle Participated in the siege of Bexar. His brother, Charles Jennings, was executed during the Goliad Massacre.[74]
Damacio Jiménez Artillery Seguins company Texas killed in battle Friend of Travis. Brought in the 18 pounder cannon.[75]
Joe Slave of Travis rode in with Travis 1813 or 1815 United States survived[74] When the battle commenced, Joe fought alongside Travis. After Travis's death, Joe took cover in a room. He was wounded when Mexican soldiers entered, but they assumed him to be a noncombatant and took him prisoner. He, along with Susana Dickinson, spread the news of the Alamo's fall to the colonies in Texas.[45][76][77]
John Johnson Private, courier unknown 1800 Missouri survived As the Mexican cavalry approached on February 23, Travis dispatched courier John Johnson to ask Colonel James Fannin, 100 miles (160 km) southeast, to send reinforcements immediately.[78][79] Went to Gonzales March 5–6 and joined under P.R.Splane and fought at San Jacinto [80] Johnson's name also appears on the Alamo voting list.[81]
Lewis Johnson Private Carey (possibly) Illinois Territory (possibly) killed in battle[82] Participated in the siege of Bexar.[83]
William Johnson Private Carey (possibly) Philadelphia, Pennsylvania killed in battle[83]
William P. Johnson Sergeant (possibly) unknown survived Likely a courier who left with a message to Fannin on February 23. Died in the Goliad Massacre.[83]
John Jones First Lieutenant Blazeby 1810 New York killed in battle Originally a member of Breece's New Orleans Greys. Participated in the siege of Bexar.[83]
John Benjamin Kellogg Rode with Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1817 Kentucky killed in battle Gonzales resident. Arrived at the Alamo on March 1, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[84]
James Kenney 1814 Virginia killed in battle Enlisted on September 28, 1835. Served in Capt. Robert M. Coleman's company, then reinlisted.[85]
Andrew Kent Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1798 Virginia killed in battle Arrived at the Alamo on March 1 as original member of the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers ("Immortal 32"). Kent County, Texas is named in his honor.[86]
Joseph Kerr Private marksman, unknown 1814 Louisiana killed in battle rode in with Louisiana Volunteers for Tx. Independence under Capt.S.L.Chamblis, Son of Ohio General and Senator Joseph Kerr.[87]
George C. Kimble Lieutenant Gonzales Ranging Company 1803 Pennsylvania killed in battle Arrived at the Alamo on March 1 as commander of the Gonzales Ranging Company of Mounted Volunteers, (the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers). Kimble County, Texas is named in his honor.[88]
William Philip King Private rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers October 8, 1820 Monroe County, Mississippi youngest defender killed in the battle King County was named in his honor. Traded places at the Alamo with his father(told his father to go back home).[89]
William Irvine Lewis Private, marksman went with Bowie 1806 Virginia killed in battle left from NC, his mother was given a small stone memento from the Alamo[90]
William J. Lightfoot 3rd Corpl. Carey's artillery company 1805 Kentucky killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo.[90] Actual name is John William Lightfoot.
Jonathan L. Lindley Private, artilliaryman Carey's artillery company 1814 Illinois killed in battle fought at Bexar, lived in Gonzales, rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers on March 1[90]
William Linn Private, marksman Capt. Blazeby's infantry company Massachusetts killed in battle fought at Bexar as member of Breece's Greys, captured and released by Mexican soldiers[91]
Byrd Lockhart Commissioner, empowered to muster Gonzales Ranging Company Gonzales Ranging Company 1782 Virginia survived On February 23, Lockhart and Andrew Sowell were scouting for provisions when the Mexican army arrived. Unable to re-enter the Alamo, they went to Gonzales.[92] He may have reentered on March 1 with the Gonzales relief forces and left again with Smith.[93]
Toribio Losoya marksman Seguín's company 1808 Texas killed in battle Former Mexican soldier, lived in house near the southwest corner of the Alamo compound, His family took refuge in the Alamo chapel.[94]
George Washington Main Lieutenant White's infantry co. 1807 Virginia killed in battle Fought at Bexar, wounded[95]
William T. Malone Private, artillery Carey's artillery co. 1817 Athens, Alabama killed in battle fought at Bexar remained at Alamo with Carey[96]
William Marshall Private, marksman Blazeby's infantry co. 1808 Tennessee killed in battle fought at Bexar remained at Alamo with Blazeby[96]
Albert Martin Captain, courier rode back in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1808 Rhode Island killed in battle fought at Bexar, Gonzales resident, member "Old Eighteen", Travis' emissary to Almonte, carried Travis' 2/24 message to Gonzales, returned with Gonzales relief[97]
Samuel Maverick Private, delegate unknown 1803 Pendleton, South Carolina survived fought at Bexar, San Antonio resident, stayed in Bexar, elected a delegate from the Alamo garrison on February 1 to the independence convention in March, left the Alamo garrison on March 2.[98]
Edward McCafferty Lieutenant Bowies company unknown unknown, Refugio resident killed in battle Possible officer to Jim Bowie's men[97]
Jesse McCoy Private, marksman Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1804 Tennessee killed in battle original settler of Dewitt's Colony, rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32" )[99]
William McDowell Private, marksman Harrison's company 1794 Pennsylvania killed in battle joined Vol.Aux.Corps in Nacogdoches[99]
James McGee Private, marksman Blazeby's infantry co. unknown Ireland killed in battle fought at Bexar remained with Blazeby[99]
John McGregor Sergeant Carey's company 1808 Scotland killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo with Carey, played bagpipes accompanied by Crockett's fiddle[100]
Robert McKinney Private rode in with Bowie 1809 Ireland killed in battle Immigrated in 1835 from Ireland to America.[101] Formerly resident of New Orleans[100]
Eliel Melton Quartermaster with the rank of Lieutenant Member of Lt. Col. James C. Neill's staff 1798 Georgia killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo as Quartermaster, reportedly killed by Mexican Cavalry outside the Alamo[102]
Thomas R. Miller Private, marksman Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1795 Tennessee killed in battle Gonzales resident & merchant, member of Consultation, one of the "Old Eighteen", held title to the western half of Seguin, Texas,[103] rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers[104]
William Mills Private, marksman rode in with Bowie 1815 Tennessee killed in battle Austin's Colony resident, formerly Mississippi[104]
Isaac Millsaps Private, marksman Gonzales Mounted Rangers c. 1795 Mississippi killed in battle Gonzales resident, wife Mary was blind, rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32")[105]
Edward F. Mitchusson Alamo surgeon Alamo hospital 1806 Virginia killed in battle Washington County, Tx. resident, fought at Bexar, badly wounded, joined Chenoweth's company[105]
Edwin T. Mitchell Private, marksman White's infantry co. 1806 unknown killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo with Bexar Guards,( A Mitchell was killed defending Juana Alsbury)[106]
Napoleon B. Mitchell Private, artillery Carey's artillery co. 1804 unknown killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo with Carey,( A Mitchell was killed defending Juana Alsbury)[106]
Robert B. Moore Private, marksman Blazeby's company 1781 Virginia killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo with Blazeby[107]
Willis A. Moore Private, marksman may have rode in with Bowie 1808 unknown, Mississippi resident killed in battle fought at Bexar, former Chenoweth's N.O. Grey company[107]
John Morman New Orleans Greys killed in battle Morman is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1836 Captain Thomas Breece compiled a list of the men who had originally been under his command, and marked Morman as killed at the Alamo.[6]
Robert Musselman Sergeant Capt. William Blazeby' infantry company 1805 Ohio killed in battle Formerly served in US Army during Seminole Indian War; one of the few Alamo defenders-besides Travis; Crockett, Autry, and Bonham-who had prior military experience.
Andrés Nava Private, marksman Seguín's company 1810 Texas killed in battle Served at siege of Bexar[108]
Gerald Navan Private, courier survived Alamo courier with John Smith as listed above, who last left on March 3. They were the first reporters of the fall of the Alamo, in Gonzales. Helped compile the first list of slain Alamo defenders for the Telegraph and Texas Register issue of March 24, Fought at Bexar in Parrott's Artillery Company, Navan is on the J.C.Neill list of Carey's company, when Neill left the Alamo in mid February[1]
George Neggan Private, marksman rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1808 South Carolina killed in battle resident of Gonzales[109]
Andrew M. Nelson Private, marksman unknown, volunteer 1809 Tennessee killed in battle single, son of John & Elizabeth Mansfield Nelson[110]
Edward Nelson Private, marksman Baker's company 1816 South Carolina killed in battle rode in with Bowie, fought at Bexar in Peacock's artillery, joined Chenoweth's company in Jan.[110]
George Nelson Private, marksman Blazeby's infantry 1805 South Carolina killed in battle rode in with Breece's N.O.Greys, fought at Bexar, wounded, remained at Alamo with Blazeby[111]
Benjamin F. Nobles Lieutenant, spy rode with Dimmit's company unknown unknown survived Nobles left the Alamo with Dimitt on February 23.[111][112]
James Northcross Private, artillery Carey's artillery 1804 Virginia killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo with Carey[113]
James Nowlan Private, marksman rode with Cooke's N.O.Grey's 1809 England killed in battle fought at Bexar, badly wounded[114]
William Sanders Oury Private, marksman, courier followed Travis into the Alamo August 13, 1817 Abingdon, Virginia survived sent out as a courier February 29, later survived Mier Expedition[115]
George Pagan Private unknown, artillery 1810 unknown, formerly Natchez Mississippi killed in battle fought at Bexar under Neill[116]
Christopher Adams Parker Private, marksman rode in with Dimmitt 1814 unknown, Mississippi resident killed in battle his father fought at New Orleans 1814, grandfather fought at Valley forge[117]
William Parks Private, marksman White's infantry company 1805 Rowan County, North Carolina killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo as Bexar Guard[117]
William Hester Patton Assistant Quartermaster In-charge of Alamo companies 1808 Kentucky survived probable courier of March 3 letters, Crockett's nephew,[33] commanded a company at Bexar, officer of the Alamo garrison[118]
Richardson Perry Private Carey's artillery 1817 Mississippi killed in battle Served at siege of Bexar[119]
Amos Pollard Alamo Surgeon Alamo hospital, chief surgeon (under Neill) October 29, 1803 Ashburnham, Massachusetts killed in battle joined as regimental surgeon under S.F.Austin, remained at Alamo[120]
John Purdy Reynolds Private, marksman, surgeon Harrison's company 1806 Pennsylvania killed in battle joined Vol.Aux.Corps in Nacogdoches, rode in with Capt.Harrison's company[120]
Thomas H. Roberts Private, marksman Baker's company unknown unknown killed in battle entered with Bowie[121]
James Waters Robertson Private, marksman unknown, volunteer 1812 Tennessee killed in battle Fought at Bexar[121]
Isaac Robinson 4th Sergeant Carey's artillery 1808 Scotland killed in battle Fought at Bexar, remained in Alamo in Carey's company[121]
James M. Rose Private, marksman Crockett's company 1805 Ohio killed in battle Nephew of President James Madison. Followed the Company of David Crockett.[122]
Louis Moses Rose Private, marksman Baker's company 1785 Ardennes, France survived Previously served in the French Army in the Napoleonic Wars from 1806-1815 and received the Legion of Honour. Followed Bowie to Texas. Told of Travis' line in the sand. Escaped through a window.[123] details of the escape of Rose as told by Zuber appear conflicting[33]
Jacob Roth Major Harrison's company (VAC) unknown killed in battle Roth is not included on most lists of Alamo defenders. Lindley believes that Roth should be included. Roth appeared on a February 1, 1836 muster roll at the Alamo garrison, and a petition to the Nacogdoches probate court on January 31, 1838 to settle Roth's affairs listed his death as on or about March 6.[66]
Jackson J. Rusk Private, marksman Baker's company unknown Ireland killed in battle Nacogdoches resident, rode in with Bowie[124]
Joseph Rutherford Private, marksman Carey's company 1798 Kentucky killed in battle Fought at Bexar, remained in Alamo in Carey's company[124]
Isaac Ryan Private, marksman Whites infantry 1805 Louisiana killed in battle Fought at Bexar, remained in Alamo as Bexar Guard[124]
Mial Scurlock Private, marksman unknown, volunteer May 25, 1809 Chatham County, North Carolina killed in battle Fought at Bexar[125]
Juan Seguín Captain Commander of his own cavalry company October 27, 1806 San Antonio, Texas survived Seguin left on February 25 to recruit reinforcements. After encountering a Mexican patrol he pretended to be an officer in the Mexican army. When he neared the soldiers he spurred his horse and used his knowledge of the terrain to escape.[126][127]
Marcus L. Sewell Private Gonzales Ranging Company 1805 England killed in battle Followed in with Capt. Byrd Lockhart on March 1, rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32" )[128]
Manson Shied Private Capt. William R. Carey's artillery Co. 1811 Georgia killed in battle Served at siege of Bexar[129]
Cleveland Kinloch Simmons Lieutenant Forsyth's company June 8, 1815 Charleston, South Carolina killed in battle signed on in San Felipe as officer in Texas Regular Army[130]
Andrew H. Smith Private, marksman Forsyth's cavalry 1815 Tennessee killed in battle service is questionable[130]
Charles S. Smith Private Carey's artillery 1806 Maryland killed in battle fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo with Carey[131]
Joshua G. Smith Sergeant Forsyth's company 1808 North Carolina killed in battle Bastrop resident[132]
John William Smith scout, guide, courier Gonzales Ranging Company March 4, 1792 Virginia survived Smith first left the Alamo on February 23 with one of Travis's first pleas for help.[133] On March 1, he returned guiding the 32 reinforcements from Gonzales into the Alamo,[134] and left again on March 3 with another message from Travis, he was returning with 25 reinforcements when the Alamo fell, later became San Antonio mayor[135][136]
William H. Smith Private William R. Carey's artillery 1811 unknown, Nacogdoches resident killed in battle served at the siege of Bexar[137]
Launcelot Smither Private rode in with Travis 1800 unknown, San Felipe resident, formerly Alabama survived courier, left on February 23, killed by Woll's men 1842[131]
Andrew Jackson Sowell Private, forager unknown, Gonzales resident, (Sowell, Smith, and Lockhart possibly guided the Gonzales Mounted Rangers back in on March 1) June 17, 1815 Tennessee survived In September 1835, A.J, Sowell joined with John N. Sowell (one of the "Old Eighteen") who refused to relinquish the Gonzales cannon, then went on the serve at Bexar, on February 23, 1836 Lockhart and Sowell were scouting for provisions when the Mexican army arrived. Unable to re-enter the Alamo, he went to Gonzales and assisted in the Runaway Scrape, later became a Texas Ranger[92][138]
John Spratt New Orleans Greys killed in battle Spratt is not listed on most lists of Alamo defenders. In fall 1836 Captain Thomas Breece compiled a list of the men who had originally been under his command, and marked Spratt as killed at the Alamo.[6]
Richard Starr Private, marksman Blazeby's infantry 1811 England killed in battle rode in with Breece's N.O.Greys, fought at Bexar, remained at Alamo[139]
James E. Stewart Private, marksman unknown 1808 England killed in battle limited information[139]
Richard L. Stockton Private, marksman Harrison' company 1817 New Jersey killed in battle joined Vol. Aux.Corps in Nacogdoches, rode in with Capt.Harrison's company[139]
A. Spain Summerlin Private, marksman White's infantry 1817 Tennessee killed in battle resident of Nacogdoches, fought at Bexar, stayed at Alamo in the Bexar Guards[140]
William E. Summers Private, marksman Gonzales Ranging Company 1812 Tennessee killed in battle resident of Gonzales, rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32" )[140]
John Sutherland Jr. Private, physician Patton's Company, Alamo Hospital May 11, 1792 Danville, Pittsylvania County, Virginia survived Injured in a fall from his horse and could not fight, so Col. William B. Travis sent him Out February 23 to recruit help from Gonzales. Later wrote The Fall of the Alamo, pub. in 1936[141]
William DePriest Sutherland Private, marksman, physicians assistant Patton's Company, Alamo Hospital August 10, 1818 Tennessee, Navidad, Tx. resident, formerly Alabama killed in battle Followed his uncle, John Sutherland Jr., into the Alamo[142]
Edward Taylor Private marksman, unknown 1812 Tennessee killed in battle Taylor County, Texas is named for him and his brothers, George and James, who also died in the Alamo.[143]
George Taylor Private marksman, unknown 1816 Tennessee killed in battle Taylor County, Texas is named for him and his brothers, Edward and James, who also died in the Alamo.[144]
James Taylor Private marksman, unknown 1814 Tennessee killed in battle Taylor County, Texas is named for him and his brothers, George and Edward, who also died in the Alamo.[144]
William Taylor Private marksman, unknown 1799 Tennessee killed in battle no lands given for his service[145]
B. Archer M. Thomas Private marksman, Capt.Harrison's company 1818 Kentucky killed in battle joined Vol. Aux.Corps in Nacogdoches, rode in with Capt.Harrison's company[145]
Henry Thomas Private marksman, Capt. William Blazeby's infantry 1811 Germany killed in battle rode in with Breeces New Orleans Greys[145]
Jesse G. Thompson Private marksman, unknown 1798 Arkansas killed in battle joined Capt. Seals ranger company[146]
John W. Thomson Private, surgeon, marksman Alamo hospital 1807 North Carolina killed in battle joined Vol. Aux.Corps in Nacogdoches, member of Capt.Gilmer's company[146]
John, M. Thurston Second Lieutenant Forsyth's cavalry company 1812 Pennsylvania killed in battle delivered rifle powder to Dimmit[147]
Burke Trammel Private Carey's company 1810 Ireland killed in battle Fought at Bexar, remained at the Alamo[147]
William B. Travis Lt. Colonel Commander of his own cavalry company, fully commanded Alamo on 2/24/1836 August 1, 1809 Edgefield District, South Carolina killed in battle Commanded the "Regulars"; first of the defenders to be killed in the final battle[148]
2nd cousin of defender James Butler Bonham
George W. Tumlinson Private Carey's artillery 1814 Missouri killed in battle fought at Bexar, Gonzales resident, (rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers)[149]
James Tylee Private marksman, unknown 1795 New York killed in battle married, in 1834, he applied for land in Texas[149]
Asa Walker Private, marksman Capt. Robert White's infantry company (Bexar Guards) 1813 Tennessee killed in battle Fought at Siege of Bexar. On Neill's list as hospital patient.[150]
Jacob Walker Private Capt. William R. Carey artillery company 1799 Tennessee killed in battle One of the last of the Alamo garrison to be killed-in the Alamo chapel[151]
William B. Ward Sergeant unknown, fought near artillery at main gate 1806 Ireland killed in battle Had a reputation for drunkenness in earlier postings.[152]

William B. Ward (b. 1806 - d. March 6, 1836). William B. Ward served as sergeant of volunteers in the garrison at the Alamo during the Texas Revolution. Born in Ireland and immigrating to the United States and later to Texas through New Orleans. While in San Antonio de Bexar, Ward developed a reputation of a drunk and with a penchant for profanity. However, on the morning of March 6, 1836, an eye witness (San Antonio merchant Nathaniel "Nat" Lewis) claims to have observed Ward to be sober and calm standing guard at the main gate battery of the Alamo. Ward perished with the other defenders at the Alamo when the Mexican Army, under General Antonio López de Santa Anna made the main assault on March 6, 1836.[153]

Henry Warnell Private Capt. William R. Carey artillery company 1812 Resident of Arkansas survived Historians disagree on whether Warnell was at the Alamo. The historians who place Warnell in the Alamo believe Warnell either escaped by playing dead after the battle on March 6 or that he left as a courier. Warnell died in Port Lavaca, Texas, of wounds incurred either during the final battle or during his escape as a courier.[154]
Joseph George Washington Private marksman, Harrison's company c. 1808 Tennessee killed in battle From Robertson County, Tennessee, twin sister Amanda Melvina Washington, parents Andrew Washington and Margaret Bridger.
Thomas Waters Private Capt. William R. Carey's artillery company 1812 England killed in battle Fought at siege of Bexar. Rode with Capt. Thomas Breece's company of New Orleans Greys.[155]
William Wells marksman, unknown Capt. William H. Patton's company 1798 Hall County, Georgia killed in battle married, had son & daughter[156]
Isaac White Sergeant unknown unknown unknown killed in battle was married, one daughter[157]
Robert White Captain Commander of his own infantry company, the Bexar Guards 1806 unknown, Gonzales resident killed in battle fought at Bexar, rode in as original member of the Gonzales Mounted Rangers ("Immortal 32")[158]
Hiram James Williamson Sergeant-Major of the garrison In-charge of the Alamo companies 1810 Philadelphia, Pennsylvania killed in battle Fought at siege of Bexar. Highest ranking enlisted man in the Alamo[159]
William Wills unknown unknown unknown unknown killed in battle farmer in Brazoria County, Texas[160]
David L. Wilson unknown followed Dimmitt to Bexar 1807 Scotland killed in battle remained in Alamo, resident of Nacogdoches[161]
John Wilson unknown unknown 1804 Pennsylvania killed in battle his parents were John and Jane (Nevin) Wilson[162]
Anthony Wolf unknown Capt. William R. Carey artillery company February 17, 1782 Spain killed in battle He and his sons were some of the last of garrison to be killed in Alamo Chapel[163]
Claiborne Wright unknown rode in as part of the "Immortal 32" Gonzales Mounted Rangers 1810 North Carolina killed in battle fought at Siege of Bexar, resident of Gonzales[164]
Charles Zanco lieutenant ordnance (under Neill) 1808 Randers, Denmark killed in battle fought at Siege of Bexar, remained in Alamo[165]
John unknown Hopewell believes he entered the Alamo with Bowie[166] unknown unknown killed in battle Groneman thinks he was left in the Alamo when Francis L. Desauque was sent out for supplies.[167] John was one of several black participants in the Battle of the Alamo.[168]
Pacheco, Jose Sebastian "Luciano" Capt. Juan Seguin's company Entered the Alamo with Capt. Juan Seguin and Col. Bowie[169] June 11,1819 [170] San Antonio de Bexar Alamo survivor Was dispatched to capt.Juan Seguin's rancho by Seguin and col. Travis to fetch a trunk as stated in an affidavit by Juan Seguin. Luciano joined the Tejano forces at Molino Blanco and was also a participant of the Siege of Bexar.[171]Also known as Luciano Granado[172]

Unless otherwise noted, these names are fetched from the [11] Alamo website's list[173]

See also[edit]

Footnotes[edit]

  1. ^ a b Chariton (1990), p. 180.
  2. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 1
  3. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 2.
  4. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [1] (accessed July 25, 2010).
  5. ^ Lindley (2003), p. 87.
  6. ^ a b c d e f Lindley (2003), p. 54.
  7. ^ Groneman (1990), pp. 6–7.
  8. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 7.
  9. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 8.
  10. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 9.
  11. ^ Groneman (1990), pp. 9–10.
  12. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 10.
  13. ^ Groneman (1990), pp. 10–11.
  14. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 11.
  15. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 12.
  16. ^ Groneman (1990), pp. 13–14.
  17. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 14.
  18. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 15-16.
  19. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 16.
  20. ^ Hopewell (1994), pp. 2–3.
  21. ^ Hopewell (1994), p. 116.
  22. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 19.
  23. ^ Lindley (2003), p. 62.
  24. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 20.
  25. ^ Groneman (1990), pp. 20–21.
  26. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 21.
  27. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 22.
  28. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 23.
  29. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 24.
  30. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 25.
  31. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 26.
  32. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 27.
  33. ^ a b c Lindley (2003), p. 202.
  34. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 29.
  35. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 30.
  36. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 31.
  37. ^ a b c d Groneman (1990), p. 32.
  38. ^ a b c d e Groneman (1990), p. 33.
  39. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 34.
  40. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 35.
  41. ^ a b c Dahlqvist, pp. 265-303.
  42. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 36.
  43. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 37.
  44. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 39.
  45. ^ a b c Todish (1998), p. 89.
  46. ^ Groneman (1990), pp.40–41.
  47. ^ Groneman (1990), pp. 41–42.
  48. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 42.
  49. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 45.
  50. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 46.
  51. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 47.
  52. ^ Edmondson (2000), p. 371.
  53. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 48.
  54. ^ a b c d Groneman (1990), p. 49.
  55. ^ de la Teja (1991), p. 18.
  56. ^ de la Teja (1991), p. 135, 182.
  57. ^ Lindley (2003), p. 94, 112.
  58. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 50.
  59. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 51.
  60. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 52.
  61. ^ a b c d Groneman (1990), p. 53.
  62. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 54.
  63. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 55.
  64. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 56.
  65. ^ a b c d Groneman (1990), p. 57.
  66. ^ a b Lindley (2003), p. 53.
  67. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 58.
  68. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 59.
  69. ^ a b c d Groneman (1990), p. 60.
  70. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 61.
  71. ^ Groneman
  72. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 62.
  73. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 63.
  74. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 64.
  75. ^ Handbook of Texas
  76. ^ Groneman (1990) p. 65.
  77. ^ Edmondson (2000), p. 369.
  78. ^ Lindley (2003), p. 88.
  79. ^ Lord (1961), p. 96.
  80. ^ Lindley (2003), p. 109.
  81. ^ Lindley (2003), p. 321.
  82. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 66.
  83. ^ a b c d Groneman (1990), p. 67.
  84. ^ Handbook of Texas
  85. ^ Handbook of Texas
  86. ^ Andrew Kent at Find a Grave
  87. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 69
  88. ^ The Immortal 32 Gonzales Rangers by Wallace L McKeehan accessed from The DeWitt Colony Alamo Defenders on 26 March 2010.
  89. ^ Handbook of Texas
  90. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 71.
  91. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 72.
  92. ^ a b Lindley (2003), p. 90.
  93. ^ Groneman, Alamo Defenders, pp. 72–73.
  94. ^ Handbook of Texas
  95. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 74.
  96. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 75.
  97. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 76.
  98. ^ Paula Mitchell Marks, "MAVERICK, SAMUEL AUGUSTUS," Handbook of Texas Online [2], accessed March 07, 2012. Published by the TSHA.
  99. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 77.
  100. ^ a b Todish (1998), p. 83.
  101. ^ Lord (1961), p. 217.
  102. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 78-79.
  103. ^ TAMU
  104. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p.79.
  105. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p.80.
  106. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p.81.
  107. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p.81-82.
  108. ^ Handbook of Texas
  109. ^ Handbook of Texas
  110. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p.84.
  111. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 85.
  112. ^ See section B.F.Nobles courier with Dimmit
  113. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 86.
  114. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 87.
  115. ^ Handbook of Texas
  116. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 88.
  117. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 88-89.
  118. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 89-90.
  119. ^ Handbook of Texas
  120. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 91-92
  121. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 93.
  122. ^ Handbook of Texas
  123. ^ Handbook of Texas
  124. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 95-96.
  125. ^ Handbook of Texas
  126. ^ Groneman, Alamo Defenders, p. 97.
  127. ^ Nofi, The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, pp. 85–86.
  128. ^ Handbook of Texas
  129. ^ Handbook of Texas
  130. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 100.
  131. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 101.
  132. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 103.
  133. ^ Nofi, The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, p. 78.
  134. ^ Myers, The Alamo, p. 202.
  135. ^ Groneman, pp. 101–102.
  136. ^ Todish et al., p. 90.
  137. ^ Handbook of Texas
  138. ^ Groneman, Alamo Defenders, p. 105.
  139. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 106
  140. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 107
  141. ^ Handbook of Texas
  142. ^ Handbook of Texas
  143. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 109
  144. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 110
  145. ^ a b c Groneman (1990), p. 111
  146. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 112
  147. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 113
  148. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 115
  149. ^ a b Groneman (1990), p. 116
  150. ^ Handbook of Texas
  151. ^ Handbook of Texas
  152. ^ "Ward, William B". Handbook of Texas Online. Retrieved 2009-01-22. 
  153. ^ Porter, Reuben (January 1878). "The Fall of the Alamo,". Magazine of American History.
  154. ^ Groneman, Alamo Defenders, p. 119.
  155. ^ Handbook of Texas
  156. ^ Handbook of Texas
  157. ^ Handbook of Texas
  158. ^ Groneman (1990), p. 120
  159. ^ Handbook of Texas
  160. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [3] (accessed July 28, 2010).
  161. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [4] (accessed July 28, 2010).
  162. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [5] (accessed July 28, 2010).
  163. ^ Handbook of Texas
  164. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [6] (accessed July 28, 2010)
  165. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [7] (accessed July 28, 2010).
  166. ^ Hopewell125 (1994), p. 125.
  167. ^ Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [8] (accessed September 4, 2010).
  168. ^ Handbook of Texas
  169. ^ Texas State Archives and Library Commission, Republic Claims, Reel #262, 165-178
  170. ^ Entry no.537. June 11, 1819. Baptized as Jose Sebastian de Jesus Pacheco. The son of Don Albino Pacheco and Doña Encarnacion Pulido. The Baptismals of San Fernando church by John Ogden Leal, Begins with 1731 and ends with 1855. Records of this parish church are among the Archives of the Archdiocese of San Antonio in the San Fernando Cathedral. Also, issued in 2 vols.
  171. ^ Texas State Archives and Library Commission, Republic Claims reel 262, 167-168. "," [9] (accessed Sept.9,2014).
  172. ^ Jose Sebastian was known as "Luciano" shortly after birth. aka.Luciano Granado, Residents of Texas, 1782-1836, vol.1. published by University of Texas Institute of Texan cultures 1984, pg.158, 196, 276 ISBN 0911317333, 9780911317336.
  173. ^ "List of Alamo defenders". 

References[edit]

  • Chariton, Wallace O. (1990), Exploring the Alamo Legends, Dallas, TX: Republic of Texas Press, ISBN 978-1-55622-255-9 
  • del la Teja, Jesus (1991), A Revolution Remembered: The Memoirs and Selected Correspondence of Juan N. Seguin, Austin, TX: State House Press, ISBN 0-938349-68-6 
  • Edmondson, J.R. (2000), The Alamo Story-From History to Current Conflicts, Plano, TX: Republic of Texas Press, ISBN 1-55622-678-0 
  • Groneman, Bill (1990), Alamo Defenders: A Genealogy, the People and Their Words, Austin, TX: Eakin Press, ISBN 978-0-89015-757-2 
  • Hopewell, Clifford (1994), James Bowie Texas Fighting Man: A Biography, Austin, TX: Eakin Press, ISBN 0-89015-881-9 
  • Lindley, Thomas Ricks (2003), Alamo Traces: New Evidence and New Conclusions, Lanham, MD: Republic of Texas Press, ISBN 1-55622-983-6 
  • Lord, Walter (1961), A Time to Stand, Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 0-8032-7902-7 
  • Myers, John Myers (1948), The Alamo, Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska Press, ISBN 0-8032-5779-1 
  • Nofi, Albert A. (1992), The Alamo and the Texas War of Independence, September 30, 1835 to April 21, 1836: Heroes, Myths, and History, Conshohocken, PA: Combined Books, Inc., ISBN 0-938289-10-1 
  • Todish, Timothy J.; Todish, Terry; Spring, Ted (1998), Alamo Sourcebook, 1836: A Comprehensive Guide to the Battle of the Alamo and the Texas Revolution, Austin, TX: Eakin Press, ISBN 978-1-57168-152-2 
  • Dahlqvist, Rasmus (2013), From Martin to Despallier: The Story of a French Colonial Family, North Charleston, SC: CreateSpace IPP, ISBN 978-1-49360-325-1 

Further reading[edit]

  • Rosenthal, Philip S., Alamo Soldiers: An Armchair Historian's Guide to the Defenders of the Alamo, A Team Productions (1989) ISBN 0-9622557-0-X
  • Rosenthal, Philip and Bill Groneman, Roll Call At The Alamo, The Old Army Press (1985), ISBN 0-88342-065-1

External links[edit]

Military Rolls of the Republic of Texas 1835 - 1845, Compiled by H. David Maxey [12]

Alamo Noncombatants, Handbook of Texas Online, s.v. "," [13] (accessed September 4, 2010).

In the Alamo's Shadow, By Ron Jackson [14]