Michael Bamberger

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Michael Bamberger, senior writer for Sports Illustrated.

Michael F. Bamberger (born April 15, 1960) is a senior writer for Sports Illustrated and the author of multiple books.

Early life[edit]

Bamberger was born and raised in Patchogue, New York. He attended its public schools (graduating from Patchogue-Medford High School in 1978), wrote for local newspapers and played golf on nearby public courses. He is married and lives in Philadelphia and is the father of two children.[1]

Career[edit]

After graduating from the University of Pennsylvania in 1982, Bamberger became a reporter for the Vineyard Gazette on Martha's Vineyard, Massachusetts. He joined The Philadelphia Inquirer in 1986 and became a senior writer for Sports Illustrated in 1995.

Bamberger's book documents the senior year of Pennsbury High School students.

Bamberger is the author of five nonfiction books and the co-author of one novel.

Wonderland: A Year in the Life of an American High School (2004), chronicles the senior year of a group of high school students.[2] The rights for the book were bought by Paramount, and MTV and Tollin/Robbins Productions were to produce the film, which had tentatively been named Pennsbury.[3] In 2004, Mike Tollin and Brian Robbins signed with Walt Disney Studios,[4] leaving the status of the project uncertain.

The Man Who Heard Voices: Or, How M. Night Shyamalan Risked His Career on a Fairy Tale (2006), follows the director as he writes, produces and directs the film Lady in the Water.[5]

The Swinger (2011), a novel he wrote with fellow Sports Illustrated writer Alan Shipnuck, is a satire of the Tiger Woods sex scandal.[6]

He is also the author of three autobiographical books on golf: The Green Road Home (1986), To the Linksland (1992) and This Golfing Life (2005).

Bamberger's play Bart & Fay, about the longtime relationship between Bart Giamatti and Fay Vincent, was performed in 1996 at the Walnut Street Theatre in Philadelphia.[7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Michael Bamberger; David Mamet (1978). The Water Engine: An American Fable and Mr. Happiness: Two Plays. Grove Press. pp. 216–. ISBN 978-0-8021-4197-2. 
  2. ^ Elson, Rachel (2004-06-13). "What if your high school was better than real life?". San Francisco Chronicle. pp. M3. Retrieved 2009-04-13. 
  3. ^ McNary, Dave (2003-05-14). "Variety: Par dresses for prom pic 'Pennsbury'". Retrieved 2007-02-27. 
  4. ^ McNary, Dave; Dunkley, Cathy (2004-03-04). "Variety: Tollin/Robbins inks pic pact". Retrieved 2007-02-27. 
  5. ^ Maslin, Janet (2006-07-10). "Snubbed by Disney, What's Shyamalan to Do? Walk (and Diss)". The New York Times. Retrieved 2009-04-13. 
  6. ^ Maslin, Janet (June 30, 2011). "Golf Phenom, Not Tiger Woods. Sure.". 
  7. ^ Ridley, Clifford (March 29, 1996). "Studio 3's `Bart And Fay' Looks At A Friendship". 

External links[edit]