Michael Brooks (science writer)

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Michael Edward Brooks (born 7 May 1970) is an English science writer, noted for explaining complex scientific research and findings to the general population.

Michael Edward Brooks
Born (1970-05-07) May 7, 1970 (age 44)
Nationality English
Occupation Science writer
Known for Explaining difficult scientific concepts to laymen in his books

Career[edit]

Brooks holds a PhD in Quantum Physics from the University of Sussex.[1][2] He was previously an editor for New Scientist magazine,[3] and currently works as a consultant for that magazine. His writing has appeared in The Guardian, The Independent, The Observer, The Times Higher Education Supplement, and Playboy.[4] His first novel, Entanglement, was published in 2007. His first non-fiction book, an exploration of scientific anomalies entitled 13 Things That Don't Make Sense, was published in 2009.[5][6] The book expands an article that Brooks wrote for New Scientist.[7]

Brooks' next book, The Big Questions: Physics, was released in February 2010. It contains twenty 3,000-word essays addressing the most fundamental and frequently asked questions about science.[8]

Brooks appeared as a regular guest on George Lamb's BBC Radio 6 Music show. His slot on the show, entitled Weird Science, features weird and wonderful stories from the world of science.[9]

In 2010 Brooks set up the Science Party to campaign in the UK general election on a pro-scientific manifesto. Brooks stood for the seat of Bosworth against incumbent MP David Tredinnick, who Brooks described as "a champion of pseudo-science and a hindrance to rational governance". Tredinnick is a supporter of Alternative medicine and critical of science. It was revealed in the 2009 United Kingdom parliamentary expenses scandal that Tredinnick had spent £700 of public money on astrology software, which he then repaid following media publicity.[10] Brooks received 197 votes in the election, more than he expected, but certainly not enough to unseat Tredinnick.[11]

Selected works[edit]

Books[edit]

  • Quantum Computing and Communications, edited by Brooks (Springer Verlag, 1999)
  • Entanglement (2007)
  • 13 Things That Don't Make Sense: The most baffling scientific mysteries of our time (Profile Books, 2008); US, Doubleday, 2008
  • Physics (Quercus Books, The Big Questions, 2010)
  • Free Radicals: The Secret Anarchy of Science (Profile, 2011)[12]
  • Can We Travel Through Time?: The 20 big questions of physics (Quercus, 2012)

Selected articles[edit]

  • "In Place of God: Can Secular Science ever oust Religious Belief – and should it even try?", New Scientist, 20 November 2006[13]
  • "To Make the Most of Wind Power, Go Fly a Kite", New Scientist, 14 May 2008[14]
  • "Smallest Planet weighs just Three Earths", New Scientist, 2 June 2008[15]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "author and journalist - Home". Michael Brooks. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  2. ^ "About the author - Free Radicals - The Secret Anarchy of Science". Freeradicalsbook.com. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  3. ^ http://www.tiborjones.com/author_michael_brooks.html
  4. ^ "author and journalist - Home". Michael Brooks. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  5. ^ "author and journalist - Home". Michael Brooks. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  6. ^ "13 Things That Don't Make Sense by Michael Brooks - Book - eBook". Random House. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  7. ^ "Science news and science jobs from New Scientist - New Scientist". Space.newscientist.com. 2014-04-11. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  8. ^ "The Big Questions: Physics: Michael Brooks: 9781849161466: Amazon.com: Books". Amazon.com. 2010-02-04. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  9. ^ "BBC Radio 6 Music - George Lamb". Bbc.co.uk. 2010-06-20. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  10. ^ UK election: Round one to the Science Party New Scientist article, retrieved 08/05/2010.
  11. ^ UK election: The Science Party's democracy experiment New Scientist article, retrieved 08/05/2010.
  12. ^ New York Journal of Books
  13. ^ "Welcome templeton-cambridge.org - BlueHost.com". Templeton-cambridge.org. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  14. ^ "Science news and science jobs from New Scientist - New Scientist". Environment.newscientist.com. 2014-04-11. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 
  15. ^ "Science news and science jobs from New Scientist - New Scientist". Space.newscientist.com. 2014-04-11. Retrieved 2014-04-15. 

External links[edit]