Mick Doohan

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Michael "Mick" Doohan
Mick Doohan 1990 Japanese GP.jpg
Doohan aboard the Rothmans Honda NSR500
Nationality Australian
Born (1965-06-04) 4 June 1965 (age 49)
Motorcycle racing career statistics
Grand Prix motorcycle racing
Active years 19891999
First race 1989 500 cc Japanese Grand Prix
Last race 1999 500 cc Japanese Grand Prix
First win 1990 500 cc Hungarian Grand Prix
Last win 1998 500 cc Argentine Grand Prix
Team(s) Honda
Championships 500cc- 1994, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998
Starts Wins Podiums Poles F. laps Points
137 54 95 58 46 2283

Michael "Mick" Sydney Doohan, AM[1] (born (1965-06-04)4 June 1965 in Brisbane, Australia) is a former Grand Prix motorcycle road racing World Champion, who won five consecutive 500 cc World Championships. Only Giacomo Agostini with eight (seven consecutive) and Valentino Rossi with seven (five consecutive) have won more premier class titles.[2]

Biography[edit]

Originally from the Gold Coast, near Brisbane, Doohan attended St. Joseph's College, Gregory Terrace. He raced in Australian Superbikes in the late 1980s, and also won both races as Superbike World Championship visited Oran Park in 1988 as well as the second leg of the Japanese round held earlier in the year. In a break-out season Doohan also won the final Australian motorcycle Grand Prix to be held in the TT format at Mount Panorama before the race became a round of the World Championship the following year and moved to Phillip Island. He is one of the few 500 cc or MotoGP World Champions to have won a Superbike World Championship race.[3]

He made his Grand Prix debut for Honda on a 500 cc two-stroke motorcycle in 1989. Late in the 1990 season Doohan claimed his first victory at the Hungarian Grand Prix on his way to third in the championship. In 1991, he was paired with Wayne Gardner on a Honda RVF750 superbike and won the Suzuka 8 Hours endurance race. Doohan competed successfully throughout the early 1990s and appeared to be on his way to winning his first world championship when he was seriously injured in a practice crash before the 1992 Dutch TT. He suffered permanent and serious damage to his right leg due to medical complications and, at one stage, risked amputation of the leg. At the time, Doohan was 65 points in the lead of the championship, but could not compete for eight weeks after the crash. After an arduous recovery, Doohan returned to racing for the final two races but could not prevent Yamaha rider Wayne Rainey from winning his third consecutive title (by four points from Doohan). In 1993 he struggled with the healing of his leg and the ability to race the Honda at elite level, stating later that in that year it was all he could do to just keep his ride at Honda. It was also during this time he switched to a left thumb-operated rear brake, as his right foot is no longer able to perform this function.[citation needed]

In 1994 however, he won his first 500 cc World Championship. Thereafter, until 1998, he dominated the class, winning five consecutive 500 cc World Championships. In 1997, his most successful year, Doohan won 12 out of 15 races, finished second in another two, and crashed out of the final race of the season at his home GP while leading by more than six seconds. In June 1996 Doohan was inducted as a Member of the Order of Australia for his contribution to the sport of motor racing.[citation needed]

Despite up to eight rivals on non-factory HRC Honda motorcycles Doohan's margin of superiority over them was such that in many races Doohan would build a comfortable lead and then ride well within his limits to cruise to victory. Although pure riding skill clearly played a large part in his success, the ability of his chief race engineer, Jeremy Burgess, to perfect the suspension and geometry of a racing motorcycle gave him an enormous advantage over his rivals. Between 1994 and 1998 the bike was said not to have had many changes, with Honda engineers reportedly becoming frustrated at Doohan's reluctance to try innovations such as electronic shifting (it was only when Rossi came to Honda in 1999 that Honda engineers had their head with Rossi willing to try more innovations).

One notable trait of Doohan's post-crash riding style was the use of a thumb-operated rear brake developed during 1993. This was operated by a "nudge" bar similar to a personal water craft throttle, but mounted on the left handlebar. In 1999 Doohan had another accident, this time in a very wet qualifying session for the Spanish Grand Prix. He again broke his leg in several places and subsequently announced his retirement. Jeremy Burgess, Doohan's chief engineer for his entire career, later became Valentino Rossi's chief engineer. After Doohan retired he went to work as a roving adviser to Honda's Grand Prix race effort. At the conclusion of the 2004 season, Doohan and Honda parted company.[citation needed]

In June 2011, Doohan made an appearance at the Isle of Man TT. Doohan completed a parade lap, and was most enamored by the thrill and spectacle of the Snaefell Mountain Course. He then went on to pay tribute to his former Honda racing team-mate, Joey Dunlop.[4]

Court case[edit]

In August 2006 Doohan appeared in Darwin Magistrates Court to face charges over a weekend fracas at a strip club. He faced charges of assault and failing to leave licensed premises[5] over an alleged altercation with a bouncer early on Saturday morning.

Marriage[edit]

Doohan married Selina Sines, his partner of eleven years, on Friday, 21 March 2006, on Hamilton Island; the couple have two children.

Formula One[edit]

After his success in Grand Prix motorcycle racing he got a chance to test a Formula One race car, the Williams FW19, at Circuit de Catalunya (in Spain) in April 1998. He found the car difficult to drive and crashed against a guard rail.[6]

Doohan's Motocoaster[edit]

Doohan helped design an Intamin Motorbike Launch Roller Coaster, named Mick Doohan's Motocoaster. The ride is located at Dreamworld on the Gold Coast, Queensland.[7]

Honours[edit]

Doohan was made a Member of the Order of Australia in 1996 and received an Australian Sports Medal in 2000.[1][8] He was inducted into the Sport Australia Hall of Fame in 2009.[9]

Grand Prix career statistics[edit]

This section lists Doohan's Grand Prix achievements.[10] Points system from 1988 to 1992

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Points 20 17 15 13 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

Points system from 1993

Position 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15
Points 25 20 16 13 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Class Team Machine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 Points Rank Wins
1989 500cc Rothmans Honda NSR500 JPN
Ret
AUS
8
USA
8
ESP
Ret
NAT
Ret
GER
3
AUT
8
YUG
6
NED
9
BEL
8
FRA
8
GBR
-
SWE
-
CZE
-
BRA
4
81 9th 0
1990 500cc Rothmans Honda NSR500 JPN
Ret
USA
2
ESP
4
NAT
3
GER
Ret
AUT
3
YUG
4
NED
4
BEL
6
FRA
4
GBR
4
SWE
4
CZE
9
HUN
1
AUS
2
179 3rd 1
1991 500cc Rothmans Honda NSR500 JPN
2
AUS
2
USA
2
ESP
1
ITA
1
GER
3
AUT
1
EUR
2
NED
Ret
FRA
2
GBR
3
SMR
3
CZE
2
VDM
2
MAL
3
224 2nd 3
1992 500cc Rothmans Honda NSR500 JPN
1
AUS
1
MAL
1
ESP
1
ITA
2
EUR
2
GER
1
NED
DNS
HUN
INJ
FRA
INJ
GBR
INJ
BRA
12
RSA
6
136 2nd 5
1993 500cc Rothmans Honda NSR500 AUS
Ret
MAL
4
JPN
7
ESP
4
AUT
2
GER
Ret
NED
2
EUR
2
SMR
1
GBR
Ret
CZE
3
ITA
2
USA
Ret
FIM
INJ
156 4th 1
1994 500cc HRC Honda NSR500 AUS
3
MAL
1
JPN
2
ESP
1
AUT
1
GER
1
NED
1
ITA
1
FRA
1
GBR
2
CZE
1
USA
3
ARG
1
EUR
2
317 1st 9
1995 500cc Repsol Honda NSR500 AUS
1
MAL
1
JPN
2
ESP
Ret
GER
Ret
ITA
1
NED
1
FRA
1
GBR
1
CZE
2
BRA
2
ARG
1
EUR
4
248 1st 7
1996 500cc Repsol Honda NSR500 MAL
5
INA
1
JPN
6
ESP
1
ITA
1
FRA
1
NED
1
GER
2
GBR
1
AUT
2
CZE
2
IMO
1
CAT
2
BRA
1
AUS
8
309 1st 8
1997 500cc Repsol Honda NSR500 MAL
1
JPN
1
ESP
2
ITA
1
AUT
1
FRA
1
NED
1
IMO
1
GER
1
BRA
1
GBR
1
CZE
1
CAT
1
INA
2
AUS
Ret
340 1st 12
1998 500cc Repsol Honda NSR500 JPN
Ret
MAL
1
ESP
2
ITA
1
FRA
2
MAD
Ret
NED
1
GBR
2
GER
1
CZE
Ret
IMO
1
CAT
1
AUS
1
ARG
1
260 1st 8
1999 500cc Repsol Honda NSR500 MAL
4
JPN
2
ESP
DNS
FRA
-
ITA
-
CAT
-
NED
-
GBR
-
GER
-
CZE
-
IMO
-
VAL
-
AUS
-
RSA
-
BRA
-
ARG
-
33 17th 0

World Superbike Championship[edit]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Make 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 Pos Pts
R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2 R1 R2
1988 Yamaha GBR GBR HUN HUN GER GER AUT AUT JPN
31
JPN
1
FRA FRA POR POR AUS
1
AUS
1
NZL NZL 12th 30

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "Doohan, Michael Sydney". It's an Honour. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  2. ^ "Valentino Rossi: Record breaker". Crash.Net. 25 October 2009. Retrieved 25 March 2013. 
  3. ^   . "Michael Doohan career World Superbike statistics at". Worldsbk.com. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  4. ^ Name * (10 June 2011). "Mick Doohan rides the TT course". MotoGeo. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  5. ^ "Doohan in court over assault charge – National". theage.com.au. 8 August 2006. Retrieved 27 December 2012. 
  6. ^ "Teddy Yip's Feast from the East". FORIX.com. Retrieved 13 March 2007. 
  7. ^ Parkz. "Mick Doohan's Motocoaster (Dreamworld)". Database Entry. Parkz. Retrieved 3 July 2010. 
  8. ^ "Doohan, Michael Sydney: Australian Sports Medal". It's an Honour. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  9. ^ "Michael Doohan AM". Sport Australia Hall of Fame. Retrieved 14 September 2013. 
  10. ^ "Rider Statistics – Michael Doohan". MotoGP.com. Retrieved 10 October 2012. 

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Kevin Schwantz
500 cc Motorcycle World Champion
1994–1998
Succeeded by
Àlex Crivillé