Michael Fennelly (musician)

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Michael Fennelly (b. 4 April 1949) is an American musician known for his work as a singer and songwriter in the 1960s and 1970s, notably in The Millennium and Crabby Appleton.

Fennelly was born in New York, the second of three children. He grew up in Pennsylvania and Westfield, New Jersey, where he attended high school. He began taking guitar lessons when he was nine years old. At the age of 17 he hitchhiked to Los Angeles and began performing in clubs there.[1] By 1967 he had become a member of songwriter/producer Curt Boettcher's studio-based collective of musicians. He contributed electric sitar and vocals to the album Present Tense by Sagittarius, and then became one of the five singer/guitarist/songwriters included in The Millennium, the sunshine pop group assembled by Boettcher.[2]

In 1969 he joined an existing band, Stonehenge, as lead singer, guitarist and songwriter, changing their name to Crabby Appleton. The band were signed to Elektra Records, and released two albums, with Fennelly's writing becoming influenced by such emerging musicians as Neil Young and Stephen Stills.[3] Their single "Go Back", written and sung by Fennelly, produced by Don Gallucci and taken from the band's first album, reached # 36 on the Billboard Hot 100 in mid 1970. After the band broke up, Fennelly embarked upon a solo career, recording two albums, Lane Changer (1973) and Stranger's Bed (1975). However, neither was successful. Fennelly also recorded with Steely Dan; he sings the high harmony on "The Boston Rag" from Countdown to Ecstasy, their second album.[2]

Fennelly remained in the music business thereafter, and currently lives in Portland, Oregon.

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