Michael Hooker

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Michael Hooker
Chancellor of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
In office
1995–1999
Preceded by Paul Hardin
Succeeded by William Octavius McCoy
President of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County
In office
1986–1992
Preceded by John W. Dorsey
Succeeded by Freeman Hrabowski III
President of Bennington College
In office
1982–1986
Personal details
Born (1945-08-24)August 24, 1945
Richlands, Virginia
Died June 29, 1999(1999-06-29) (aged 53)
Chapel Hill, North Carolina
Spouse(s) Carmen DeFrates
Children Alexandra Hooker
Alma mater University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (B.A., '69)
University of Massachusetts-Amherst (MA., '72, Ph.D., '73)[1]
Profession Philosopher

Michael Kenneth Hooker (August 24, 1945 – June 29, 1999) was an American academic who served as President of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and Bennington College

Early life[edit]

Hooker was born in 1945 in Richlands, Virginia.[2] A son of a coal miner, Hooker was the first in his family to attend college.[3] He chose to study philosophy at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and then going on to pursue his doctoral degree at the University of Massachusetts-Amherst.

Academia[edit]

After receiving his Ph.D., Hooker began to teach philosophy at Harvard University and the Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore. In 1975, he became dean at Johns Hopkins University until 1982 when he moved to Vermont to become the president of Bennington College. Four years later, Hooker returned to Baltimore to become the president of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, and then left in 1992 to become the president of the University of Massachusetts system. At UMBC, Hooker enhanced the quality of the university by attracting more students from around the state.[4] Finally, in 1995 he became the eight president of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill until his death in 1999. At UNC Chapel Hill, he made computer literacy a top priority, preparing students for the technological changes of the twenty-first century.[5]

Death[edit]

Michael Hooker died from complications of non-Hodgkin's lymphoma at UNC Hospitals in Chapel Hill, North Carolina.[6]

References[edit]