Michael Inzlicht

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Michael Inzlicht
Born (1972-06-20)June 20, 1972
Montreal, Quebec, Canada
Citizenship Canadian
Fields Social Psychology
Neuroscience
Cognitive Sciences
Institutions University of Toronto
Wilfrid Laurier University
New York University
Alma mater Brown University
McGill University

Michael Inzlicht is associate professor of psychology at the University of Toronto recognized in the areas of stigma and self-regulation. Much of his recent research takes a social neuroscience approach that integrates biological and psychological theories and methods to reach a fuller understanding of his phenomenon of interest[1] In the early 2000s, Inzlicht and his colleagues demonstrated that small, seemingly benign characteristics of an environment could play a large role in determining how stereotyped groups perform on academic tests. They found, for example, that the number of men in a small group could determine whether women succeeded (fewer men) or failed (more men) a math test.[2][3] More recently, Inzlicht has taken a social neuroscience approach to investigate the function, role, and psychological correlates of the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a part of the brain located in the medial prefrontal cortex and indexed by an electroencephalographic (EEG) signal called the error-related negativity (ERN). For example, he has examined how the ACC is involved in self-control depletion,[4] stereotype threat,[5] self-affirmation,[6] autonomous motivation,[7] and the strength of religious belief.[8][9][10] Finally, Inzlicht and his colleagues have worked on the concept of self-control or "willpower," being critical of models that describe self-control as relying on a limited and exhaustible resource.[11]

Selected Awards & Honours[edit]

  • 2013 - 2012 Best Social Cognition Paper Award, International Society for Social Cogniton
  • 2013 - Fellow of the Association for Psychological Science
  • 2009 - Early Researcher Award, Ontario Ministry of Research and Innovation
  • 2007 - Most Valuable Professor, Psychology Grad Student Association (University of Toronto)
  • 2006 - Louise Kidder Early Career Award, American Psychological Association (Division 9)
  • 2004-2006 - Fellow of the National Academy of Education/Spencer Foundation
  • 2002 - Society for Experimental Social Psychology, Dissertation Award, finalist
  • 1999 - Student Research Competition, American Psychological Society

Selected Publications[edit]

  • Teper, R.; Segal, Z.; Inzlicht, M. "Inside the mindful mind: How mindfulness enhances emotion regulation through improvements in executive control". Current Directions in Psychological Science. doi:10.1177/0963721413495869. 
  • Tritt, S. M.; Inzlicht, M.; Peterson, J. B. "Confounding valence and arousal: What really underlies political orientation?". Behavioral and Brain Sciences. 
  • Legault, L.; Inzlicht, M. (2013). "Self-determination, self-regulation, and the brain: Autonomy improves performance by enhancing neuroaffective responsiveness to self-regulation failure". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 105: 123–138. doi:10.1037/a0030426. 
  • Teper, R.; Inzlicht, M. (2013). "Meditation, mindfulness, and executive control: The importance of emotional acceptance and brain-based performance monitoring". Social Cognitive Affective Neuroscience 8: 85–92. doi:10.1093/scan/nss045. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; Schmeichel, B. J. (2012). "What is ego depletion? Toward a mechanistic revision of the resource model of self-control". Perspectives on Psychological Science 7: 450–463. doi:10.1177/1745691612454134. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; Al-Khindi, T. (2012). "ERN and the placebo: A misattribution approach to studying the arousal properties of the error-related negativity". Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141: 799–807. doi:10.1037/a0027586. 
  • Proulx, T.; Inzlicht, M.; Harmon-Jones, E. (2012). "Understanding all inconsistency compensation as a palliative response to violated expectations". Trends in Cognitive Sciences 16: 285–291. doi:10.1016/j.tics.2012.04.002. 
  • Legault, L.; Al-Khindi, T.; Inzlicht, M. (2012). "Preserving integrity in the face of performance threat: Self-affirmation enhances neurophysiological responsiveness to errors". Psychological Science 23: 1455–1460. doi:10.1177/0956797612448483. 
  • Inzlicht, M. & Schmader, T. (2011). Stereotype Threat: Theory, Process, and Application. New York: Oxford University Press.
  • Inzlicht, M.; Tullett, A. M.; Good, M. (2011). "The need to believe: A neuroscience account of religion as a motivated process". Religion, Brain, & Behavior 1: 192–212. doi:10.1080/2153599X.2011.647849. 
  • Legault, L.; Gutsell, J. N.; Inzlicht, M. (2011). "Ironic effects of anti-prejudice messages: How motivational intervention reduces (but also increases) prejudice". Psychological Science 22: 1472–1477. doi:10.1177/0956797611427918. 
  • Teper, R.; Inzlicht, M.; Page-Gould, E. (2011). "Are we more moral than we think? Exploring the role of affect in moral behavior and moral forecasting". Psychological Science 22: 553–558. doi:10.1177/0956797611402513. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; Kang, S. K. (2010). "Stereotype threat spillover: How coping with threats to social identity affects, aggression, eating, decision-making, and attention". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 99: 467–481. doi:10.1037/a0018951. 
  • Gutsell, J. N.; Inzlicht, M. (2010). "Empathy constrained: Prejudice predicts reduced mental simulation of actions during observation of outgroups". Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 46: 841–845. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2010.03.011. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; McGregor, I.; Hirsh, J. B.; Nash, K. (2009). "Neural markers of religious conviction". Psychological Science 20: 385–392. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2009.02305.x. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; Gutsell, J. N. (2007). "Running on empty: Neural signals for self-control failure". Psychological Science 18: 933–937. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.02004.x. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; McKay, L.; Aronson, J. (2006). "Stigma as ego depletion: How being the target of prejudice affects self-control". Psychological Science 17: 262–269. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2006.01695.x. 
  • Ben-Zeev, T.; Fein, S.; Inzlicht, M. (2005). "Stereotype Threat and Arousal". Journal of Experimental Social Psychology 41: 174–181. doi:10.1016/j.jesp.2003.11.007. 
  • Inzlicht, M.; Ben-Zeev, T. (2000). "A threatening intellectual environment: Why females are susceptible to experiencing problem-solving deficits in the presence of males". Psychological Science 11: 365–371. doi:10.1111/1467-9280.00272. 

References[edit]

  1. ^ Professional Profile: Michael Inzlicht.
  2. ^ APA Online: College women underperform on tests when in the minority.
  3. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; Ben-Zeev, Talia (2000). "A threatening intellectual environment: Why females are susceptible to experiencing problem-solving deficits in the presence of males". Psychological Science 11: 365–371. doi:10.1111/1467-9280.00272. 
  4. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; Gutsell, Jennifer (2007). "Running on empty: Neural signals for self-control failure". Psychological Science: 933–937. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2007.02004.x. 
  5. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; Kang, Sonia (2010). "Stereotype threat spillover: How coping with threats to social identity affects, aggression, eating, decision-making, and attention". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 99: 467–481. doi:10.1037/a0018951. 
  6. ^ Legault, Lisa; Al-Khindi, Timour; Inzlicht, Michael (in press). "Preserving integrity in the face of performance threat: Self-affirmation enhances neurophysiological responsiveness to task errors". Psychological Science. doi:10.1177/0956797612448483.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  7. ^ Legault, Lisa; Inzlicht, Michael (in press). "Self-determination, self-regulation, and the brain: Autonomy improves performance by enhancing neuroaffective responsiveness to self-regulation failure". Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.  Check date values in: |date= (help)
  8. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; et al (2009). "Neural markers of religious conviction". Psychological Science 20: 385–392. doi:10.1111/j.1467-9280.2009.02305.x. 
  9. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; Tullett, Alexa (2010). "Reflecting on God: Religious primes can reduce neurophysiological response to errors". Psychological Science 21: 1184–1190. doi:10.1177/0956797610375451. 
  10. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; Tullett, Alexa; Good, Marie (2011). "The need to believe: A neuroscience account of religion as a motivated process". Religion, Brain, & Behavior 1: 192–212. doi:10.1080/2153599x.2011.647849. 
  11. ^ Inzlicht, Michael; Schmeichel, Brandon (2012). "What is ego depletion? Toward a mechanistic revision of the resource model of self-control". Perspectives on Psychological Science 7: 450–463. doi:10.1177/1745691612454134. 

External links[edit]