Michael J. Gelb

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Michael J. Gelb (born 1952) is an author and public speaker specializing in creativity and innovation. He is the founder and president of The High Performance Learning Center, a firm specializing in consulting and training for organizations interested in developing more innovative cultures. He co-directs, with Professor James Clawson, the Leading Innovation: Thinking Creatively for Positive Change Seminar at the University of Virginia's Darden Graduate School of Business.

Career[edit]

Gelb has a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology and Philosophy from Clark University, and a Master's degree in Mind and Body Education from Goddard College. Gelb is a certified teacher of the Alexander Technique. Gelb holds a fourth degree black belt in Aikido.[1]

Gelb's work has been featured in the New York Times,[2] the Washington Post[3] and Training Magazine. He has also appeared on Good Morning America, CNN's Business Unusual and on radio programs including live interviews with NPR and the BBC World Service.

Bibliography[edit]

  • Brain Power: Improve Your Mind As You Age (with Kelly Howell), New World Library, 2012.
  • Wine Drinking For Inspired Thinking: Uncork Your Creative Juices
  • Innovate Like Edison: The Success System of America's Greatest Inventor (with Sarah Miller Caldicott)
  • How to Think like Leonardo Da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Everyday
  • Work Like Da Vinci (audio book)
  • Da Vinci Decoded
  • Discover Your Genius
  • More Balls than Hands, Juggling Your Way to Success
  • Lessons from the Art of Juggling (with Tony Buzan)
  • Thinking for Change
  • Present Yourself
  • Samurai Chess (with Grandmaster Raymond Keene)
  • Body Learning

Reception[edit]

'How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci'[edit]

Gelb's How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day has been featured in:

'Discover Your Genius'[edit]

Gelb's Discover Your Genius: How to Think Like History's Ten Most Revolutionary Minds has been reviewed in

'More Balls Than Hands'[edit]

His More Balls Than Hands: Juggling Your Way to Success by Learning to Love Your Mistakes has been reviewed in

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Author wants to spread the genius of da Vinci". CNN.com (Cable News Network). 1998-11-24. Retrieved 2014-02-18. 
  2. ^ Rae-Dupree, Janet (June 1, 2008). "New York Times". Da Vinci, Retrofitted for the Modern Age. New York Times. Retrieved December 1, 2011. 
  3. ^ Swoboda, Frank (October 30, 1994). "Washington Post". Hang Together, or Hang Separately: A Labor Relations Prescription. Washington Post. Retrieved December 1, 2011. 

External links[edit]