Michael Kelly (bishop)

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A statue of Archbishop Michael Kelly at St Mary's Cathedral

Michael Kelly (13 February 1850 – 8 March 1940) was an Australian Roman Catholic clergyman, the fourth Archbishop of Sydney.

Born at Waterford, Ireland, to James Kelly, a master mariner,[1] and Mary née Grant, Kelly was educated at Christian Brothers’, Enniscorthy and the Classical Academy, New Ross.

Kelly received his seminary formation at St Peter's College, Wexford and the Irish College in Rome, before being ordained at Enniscorthy on 1 November 1872 by Bishop Thomas Furlong.

Kelly served on the staff of the House of Missions, Wexford and was made vice-Rector of the Irish College, Rome, in 1891.[1] In 1894 he was made head of Irish College. Kelly also became a leader in the temperance movement.

Elected Archbishop of Achrida In Partibus Infidelium and coadjutor cum jure successionis of Sydney on 20 July 1901, Kelly was Consecrated Coadjutor Archbishop on 15 August 1901 at St Joachim's Church, Rome, by Cardinal Francesco Satolli.

Kelly succeeded to the See of Sydney on 16 August 1911 on the death of Cardinal Moran. Kelly continued his crusade for temperance. Fund-raising for schools was undertaken by Kelly, and it was estimated £12,000,000 was spent on scholastic and church properties from the time of Kelly's arrival in Sydney until his death. St Mary's Cathedral was completed in 1928 and statues of Kelly and Moran stand in the main portal.[1]

Kelly was named Bishop Assistant at the Papal Throne and Count of the Holy Roman Empire on 25 June 1926. Kelly died in Sydney aged 90, still of sound mind.[1]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d Percival Serle (1949). "Kelly, Michael". Dictionary of Australian Biography. Angus & Robertson. Retrieved 2009-07-23. 

External links[edit]

Catholic Church titles
Preceded by
Patrick Francis Moran
4th Catholic Archbishop of Sydney
1911–1940
Succeeded by
Norman Thomas Gilroy