Michael Manga

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Michael Manga is a MacArthur Fellow (2005) and a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, in the Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences. Part of his work has been funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The award from the NSF supported his studies of geological fluid mechanics and magma flow prior to eruptions. In 2003, he made Popular Science magazines second annual PopSci Billiant 10 list[1] and won the Geological Society of America's Young Scientist Award (Donath Medal).[2] In November 2005, shortly after receiving the MacArthur, Manga made another list, the People's "Sexiest Man Alive" issue in which he admits that he agreed to be included because, "I wanted to get information out to people who wouldn't normally hear or see anything about science."[3]

His research interests include planetary science, fluid mechanics, hydrology, geodynamics, and physical volcanology.

Academic Background[edit]

  • 1990 B.S. (Geophysics) McGill University in Montreal, QC, CANADA
  • 1992 S.M. (Engineering Sciences) Harvard University in Cambridge, MA USA
  • 1994 Ph.D. (Earth and Planetary Sciences) Harvard University

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Chamot, Josh. "NSF Grants Help Popular Science's "Brilliant 10" Define the Cutting Edge of Science", NSF Newsroom Archives, September 22, 2003.
  2. ^ GSA Medals & Awards, Geological Society of America website, http://www.geosociety.org/awards/03speeches/donath.htm
  3. ^ Edelstein, Wendy."Hesitant hottie", UC Berkeley News, December 2, 2005.

External links[edit]