Michael Marshall Smith

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For other people named Michael Smith, see Michael Smith (disambiguation).
Michael Marshall Smith
Born Michael Philip Marshall Smith
(1965-05-03) 3 May 1965 (age 49)
Knutsford, Cheshire, England
Pen name Michael Marshall
Occupation Author
Nationality British
Website
www.michaelmarshallsmith.com

Michael Philip Marshall Smith (born 3 May 1965) is an English novelist, screenwriter and short story writer who also writes as Michael Marshall.

Biography[edit]

Born in Knutsford, Cheshire, Smith moved with his family at an early age to first Illinois and then Florida. At the age of seven he moved again, this time to South Africa, and then to Australia before eventually returning home to England in 1973.[1]

He was educated at Chigwell School, where he was in Swallows House and dated fellow pupil and future senior Sky News editor Sally Arthy, and King's College, Cambridge, where he studied philosophy, social and political science, and became involved with the Cambridge Footlights.[2] Under the pseudonym of Michael Rutger, he moved on to become a comedy writer and performer on the BBC Radio 4 series And Now in Colour which has been described[by whom?] as a 'cult hit'[citation needed] and ran for two series. Between 2002 and 2004 he also co-wrote material for two series of surreal comedy Dare To Believe.

Writing career[edit]

His first published story was The Man Who Drew Cats which won the British Fantasy Award in 1991 for "Best Short Story".[3] He has been published in Postscripts. His first novel, Only Forward, was published in 1994 and won the August Derleth Award for Best Novel in 1995, and then the Philip K. Dick Award in 2000. The plot involves the lead character, Stark, having to find a missing man he believes to have been kidnapped, and travel through the strange zones of his city. In 1996 his second novel, Spares, was released, a novel in which the lead character, Jack, goes on the run with clones who are used for spare body parts for rich people, when he realises they are people with feelings. Steven Spielberg's DreamWorks purchased the film rights for Spares, but a film was never made. When the rights lapsed, DreamWorks did produce The Island, whose plot had strong similarities to Spares, though Smith did not consider it worthwhile to pursue legal action over the similarities. He now considers it unlikely a Spares film will ever be made.[4]

The novel The Straw Men was the first to be written under the shortened name "Michael Marshall". This change of name was originally due to the publishing of another book of the same name in 2001 by Martin J. Smith. However, Michael then decided to use the split to offer the possibility of publishing different genres of books under the two names – "modern day" novels as Michael Marshall, and horror/science fiction as Michael Marshall Smith (cf. Iain (M.) Banks).

On 1 September 2006, it was announced on his official website that the horror short story Hell Hath Enlarged Herself was in development as a feature film by Cuba Productions and Lightworks Films, financed by the UK Film Council. Smith will be a producer and co-screenwriter on the film.

In 2012 he launched Ememess Press, a virtual small press specialising in producing electronic versions of the short fiction written under the name Michael Marshall Smith.[5]

Intruders, an upcoming television series on BBC America, is based on Smith's 2007 novel The Intruders.[6]

Bibliography[edit]

Novels[edit]

As Michael Marshall:

Novellas[edit]

Collections[edit]

Awards[edit]

  • British Fantasy Society award for Short Fiction, The Man Who Drew Cats (1991)
  • British Fantasy Society Icarus Award for Best Newcomer (1991)
  • British Fantasy Society award for Short Fiction, The Dark Land (1992)
  • British Fantasy Society August Derleth Award (Best Novel), Only Forward (1995)
  • British Fantasy Society award for Short Fiction, More Tomorrow (1996)
  • Philip K. Dick Award – Norwescon, Only Forward (2000)

References[edit]

  • Michael Marshall Smith: The Annotated Bibliography (2004) by Lavie Tidhar

External links[edit]