Michael McCullough (entrepreneur)

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Michael McCullough is an American entrepreneur, emergency room doctor, and investor in life-science startup companies. He was a Rhodes Scholar. He lives in Palo Alto, California.

Career[edit]

Dr. McCullough holds several concurrent positions.[1] He is a principal/partner at Capricorn Healthcare and Special Opportunities. He is a board member of the Dalai Lama Foundation. He is founder/president of QuestBridge.[2] He is a partner at Headwaters Capital Partners.[3] He is a member of the Scientific/Strategic Advisory Board at Heartflow, Inc. He is an assistant clinical professor of emergency medicine and attending physician at CEP/SCVMC at University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).[4] He is a co-founder and board member of Kaeme, a nonprofit organization that works to reunite children living in orphanages in Ghana, West Africa with their families. [5]

McCullough was a board member at 2Tor (now 2U), co-founder and president at RegenMed Systems, founder at BeAGoodDoctor.Org, a fellow at the Kauffman Foundation,[3] and a founder of the Courage Project and BeAGoodDoctor.Org. He served as the emergency doctor for the Dalai Lama and entourage at the Office of Tibet. He is a founder at Dharamsala, India Clinical Internship, co-chair of Medicine Track at Singularity University, member of the medical devices committee at Life Science Angels, principal at Amp Capital, advisor/consultant at Shmoop, eCullet, ConnectEdu, 4Afri, Vocera, NanoDimension and other life science companies.[6]

He serves as a consultant to venture capital funds on life sciences and education investments at NanoDimension and Venrock. He was a founder of S.C.O.P.E., founder of Roatan Clinical and Public Health Internship, fellow at Ashoka,[7] founder of Nepal Clinical Internship, co-founder of Quest Scholars Program, and Co-Founder of SMYSP.

Education[edit]

His medical degree is from the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) School of Medicine, and his medical residency was at Stanford Hospital's emergency unit.[8] He was a Rhodes scholar at Balliol College, Oxford University, and also studied at the John Radcliffe Hospital there. His undergraduate degree is from Stanford University.

References[edit]