Michael Worth

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Michael Troy Worth (born January 13, 1965 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania) is an American actor.

Biography[edit]

Born in Philadelphia in 1972 (it is erroneously listed as 1965), Worth is from German and Delaware Indian Native American heritage. As a child, he grew up near the Chesapeake Bay before moving to Northern California with his parents. At the age of 11, he directed his first film titled The Tire with a super 8mm camera he had spent his allowance on. He continued making short films and experimental video projects during his youth including The Toad Warriors and The Berkeley Junk Food Massacre.

Sometime later, he moved to Los Angeles, and earned a handful of bit parts in film and television including Pacific Blue and Alien Nation. He lived with his dog in his truck for 6 months in Venice, California while trying to save money. Surviving on odd jobs and construction work, Michael accepted whatever small parts he could as he climbed the Hollywood ladder.

His first leading role was in the independent action film Final Impact. Variety magazine labeled him a "promising newcomer". Signed to several films with PM Entertainment, he worked through a series of low-budget films before landing the role of "Tommy" on the TV series Acapulco H.E.A.T.. He was also one of the front-runners for the role of Robin in Batman Forever, although the role ultimately went to Chris O'Donnell. Worth ended up having a cameo alongside O'Donnell in one of the film's fight scenes (throwing the final kick at Robin in the alleyway). He also appeared in "The Storytellers" alongside Tippi Hedren.

In 2004, he wrote and directed a micro-budget experimental film, titled Killing Cupid. It earned him a Best Director nomination at the Action On Film Film Festival in 2005 as well as "Best Fiction Film" at the "Hollywood Documentary and Fiction Film Festival" in 2006. He continued to act in a variety of small independent films while honing his skills as a filmmaker, ghostwriting for film and television, as well as directing second unit. Worth wrote the screenplays for and starred in the psychological thriller/western film Dual (2005) and the sci-fi/horror film Devil On The Mountain (2006). He also appeared in an episode of the CBS sitcom The King of Queens in 2005.

In 2008, Worth was given the opportunity to write and direct a feature film. "God's Ears" was released in March 2008 at the Method Fest Independent Film Festival. Besides writing and directing the film, Worth also starred in it, playing a boxer with autism who falls in love with a dancer. Worth was nominated for a Breakout Acting Award at MethodFest 2008 for his performance as Noah Connely. Worth won the Best Director award at "The Las Vegas Film Festival" and God's Ears was the only US entry into the Skip City D-Cinema Film Festival in Japan, in 2009. He also won two awards at New York's Visionfest, "The Jack Nance Breakout Performance Award" and "The Domani Emerging Talent Award".

Following in the footsteps of other successful writer/director/actors such as Clint Eastwood, Woody Allen and John Cassavetes, Michael continues to act, write screenplays and direct films. His recent slate includes the anticipated comedy, Brung Me the Head of Lance Henriksen and the indie Romance, Enchanting The Mortals.

Worth has been tapped to direct Come Back to Sorrento since 2010, an adaptation of the 1932 novel of the same name by Dawn Powell. David Mamet and Rebecca Pidgeon are writing the script, and according to IMDB, the project is still in the development stages. Worth is currently planning a return to action films in 2014 with two martial arts based scripts he is co-writing.

External links[edit]