Michael Yezerski

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Michael Yezerski is an award-winning Australian composer known for his scores for features film such as The Waiting City, The Black Balloon (for which he won an APRA Award[1] and a Screen Music Award),[2] Newcastle, and Thursday's Fictions, as well as collaborations with the Australian Chamber Orchestra and the Gondwana Voices Children's Choir (such as an adaptation of Shaun Tan's book The Red Tree),[3] the National Museum of Canberra, Synergy Percussion and The Physical TV Company.

Awards and nominations[edit]

APRA Awards[edit]

The annual APRA Awards include the Screen Music Awards which are presented by Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA) and Australian Guild of Screen Composers (AGSC).[4] The APRA Awards also include the Classical Music Awards which are distributed by APRA and the Australian Music Centre (AMC).[5]

  • 2008 Screen Music Awards, Best Original Song Composed for the Screen win for "When We Get There" on The Black Balloon composed by Josh Pyke and Michael Yezerski.[6]
  • 2008 Screen Music Awards, Best Original Song Composed for the Screen nomination for "The Greatest Act in History" on The Black Balloon, composed by Yezerski.[7]
  • 2008 Screen Music Awards, Best Soundtrack Album win for The Black Balloon composed by Yezerski.[6]
  • 2009 Classical Music Awards, Best Composition by an Australian Composer nomination for The Red Tree composed by Yezerski and Richard Tognetti.[8]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The Black Balloon and Underbelly claim music honours". The Age (Melbourne). 4 November 2008. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  2. ^ Mengel, Noel (5 November 2008). "Stevie Wonder, Tim Finn bring tears of joy". Courier Mail. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  3. ^ Wilson, Ashleigh (4 July 2008). "Music completes the picture". The Australian. Retrieved 28 December 2009. 
  4. ^ "Screen Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 28 April 2010. 
  5. ^ "Classical Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 28 April 2010. 
  6. ^ a b "2008 Winners - Screen Music Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 29 April 2010. 
  7. ^ "2008 Nominations - Screen Music Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 29 April 2010. 
  8. ^ "2009 Finalists - Classical Music Awards". Australasian Performing Right Association (APRA). Retrieved 24 April 2010. 

External links[edit]