Michael Young (businessman)

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Michael Alan Young is a businessman with a political background. He secretly organised the meetings between the South African Government and the leadership of the African National Congress (ANC).

Career[edit]

After graduating from the University of York in PPE in 1972,[1] Young started his career in 10 Downing Street, the Prime Minister's office and in the Foreign Office when Edward Heath was Prime Minister.[2] He moved to ARC Ltd and then to its parent Consolidated Gold Fields as Public Affairs Manager where he worked under the Chairman Rudolph Agnew.[2] It was under Agnew that Young organised secret meetings at Mells Park House, a building designed by Edwin Lutyens in Somerset.[2] The meetings were attended by various delegates from the South African Government as well as leaders of the ANC such as Thabo Mbeki and Oliver Tambo.[2] The meetings contributed to the end of South Africa's apartheid regime.[2] In 2001 he was appointed OBE for his contribution to human rights.[3]

In 2009 Michael Young was the subject of a TV drama called Endgame[2] produced by Channel 4, a national Television Network in the United Kingdom.[4]

See also[edit]

Young's views on conflict resolution[edit]

Michael Young has summarised his prescription for good conflict resolution: "Having an analytical set of propositions" and "Taking the process away from the theatre - removing the potential for playing to the gallery".[4]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "The end of apartheid - an untold story". Grapevine (Alumni Office, University of York) (Spring/Summer 2002): 14–15. 
  2. ^ a b c d e f Briton who helped end South Africa's apartheid The Times, 4 May 2009
  3. ^ The Queen's Birthday Honours BBC News, 15 June 2001
  4. ^ a b The 'Real' Michael Young

Further reading[edit]

  • Robert Harvey, The Fall of Apartheid, Houndmills, Basingstoke, Hampshire ; New York : Palgrave, 2001. ISBN 978-0333802472

External links[edit]