Míchel (footballer)

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Míchel
Michel09.jpg
Míchel as Getafe coach
Personal information
Full name José Miguel González Martín del Campo
Date of birth (1963-03-23) 23 March 1963 (age 51)
Place of birth Madrid, Spain
Height 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in)
Playing position Midfielder
Club information
Current team
Olympiacos (coach)
Youth career
1976–1981 Real Madrid
Senior career*
Years Team Apps (Gls)
1981–1984 Real Madrid B 108 (25)
1982–1996 Real Madrid 404 (97)
1996–1997 Celaya 34 (9)
Total 546 (131)
National team
1980 Spain U16 3 (0)
1980–1981 Spain U18 21 (11)
1983–1984 Spain U21 7 (1)
1984 Spain amateur 1 (0)
1985–1992 Spain 66 (21)
Teams managed
2005–2006 Rayo Vallecano
2006–2007 Real Madrid B
2009–2011 Getafe
2012–2013 Sevilla
2013– Olympiacos
* Senior club appearances and goals counted for the domestic league only.
† Appearances (Goals).
This article is about the Spanish right midfielder and coach. For other players with the same nickname, see Míchel (nickname).
This name uses Spanish naming customs; the first or paternal family name is González and the second or maternal family name is Martín del Campo.

José Miguel González Martín del Campo, commonly known as Míchel (Spanish pronunciation: [ˈmitʃel]; born 23 March 1963), is a Spanish retired footballer who played as a right midfielder, and the current coach of Olympiacos F.C. in the Superleague Greece.

He was most noted for his stellar crossing ability, also contributing with a fair share of goals.[1] During his career he represented mainly Real Madrid – over a decade – achieving great team and individual success.

Míchel gained nearly 70 caps for Spain from 1985 to 1992, and represented the nation in two World Cups (scoring four goals in the 1990 edition) and one European Championship. He started working as a manager in 2005.

Club career[edit]

The son of a footballer who had to retire from the game at 27 after a road accident, Míchel was born in Madrid and joined Real Madrid at the age of thirteen,[2] his technique and physicality on the pitch quickly standing out.[1] He moved quickly through the ranks to the first team, appearing – and scoring – once in the 1981–82 season, in a 2–1 away win against CD Castellón on 11 April 1982.

A member of the renowned Quinta del Buitre, which also featured Emilio Butragueño, Miguel Pardeza, Rafael Martín Vázquez and Manuel Sanchís,[2] Míchel never played less than 31 La Liga contests from 1985 to 1994. After helping Castilla CF to the second division title in 1984, he was instrumental in the capital side's conquests, which included six leagues and two consecutive UEFA Cups; he opened the score in the 1985 final of the latter competition, against Videoton FC.[2]

In 1989 Míchel announced he would leave Real Madrid after having signed with an Italian s, but this never came to pass and he ended up staying until 1996. In his penultimate season he suffered a severe knee injury which rendered him unavailable for most of the successful league campaign,[2] but still bounced back for a final solid year, after which he left for Club Celaya in Mexico – where Butragueño was also playing – shortly after the arrival at Madrid of president Lorenzo Sanz. He retired from football in 1997.[1]

Míchel's career was not without incident: in 1988 he was hit by a bottle while on the pitch and, three years later, he was sanctioned by UEFA for using an unorthodox method of disrupting the concentration of Colombian Carlos Valderrama, in a game against Real Valladolid. The presiding judge in the case noted that "manipulating in public that of your neighbour which is a gift given exclusively to males by nature" violated a federation rule protecting a player's dignity.[3]

In the summer of 2005, after working as a sports commentator with RTVE after his retirement (still active, he had already worked in the capacity at the 1994 World Cup) and also writing articles for Madrid's Marca,[2] Míchel was appointed manager of Rayo Vallecano.[4] The following year he returned to his alma mater as director of Real Madrid's sports city, the entire youth system, and manager duties at Real Madrid Castilla,[5] where he coached one of his sons, Adrián; under his management the side dropped down a level into the third and he was sacked, also leaving his post in the youth sides due to disagreements with president Ramón Calderón.[6]

On 27 April 2009 Míchel was appointed as coach of top flight strugglers Getafe CF, until the end of the season. He replaced former FC Barcelona midfielder Víctor Muñoz,[7] and also managed Adrián, helping the club avoid relegation in the last matchday, and renewing his contract for two more years in the following week; he was relieved of his duties at the end of 2010–11, with the team again managing to stay afloat after finishing 16th, just one point clear of the relegation zone.

Míchel was appointed at Sevilla FC on 6 February 2012, replacing fired Marcelino García Toral and signing until the end of the season.[8] On 14 January of the following year, after a 0–2 away loss to Valencia CF that left the Andalusians in the 12th place, he was relieved of his duties.[9]

Míchel signed for Olympiacos F.C. in the Superleague Greece on 1 February 2013, penning a contract until June 2015.[10] In his first 18 months in charge, he won two national championships and the 2013 Greek Cup.[11]

International career[edit]

Míchel made his debut for the national team on 20 November 1985 against Austria, going on to appear in a further 65 internationals and scoring 21 goals (only missed a callup due to injury).[12]

He played in the 1990 FIFA World Cup, netting a hat-trick against South Korea in Spain's second game (3–1)[13] and also a penalty against Belgium in the nation's final group game. After Javier Clemente's arrival as national boss he was deemed surplus to requirements and never called again, although only 29.

All national categories added, Míchel received exactly 100 caps.[1]

International goals[edit]

# Date Venue Opponent Score Result Competition
1. 18 December 1985 Luis Casanova, Valencia, Spain  Bulgaria 1–0 2–0 Friendly
2. 12 November 1986 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Romania 1–0 1–0 Euro 1988 qualifying
3. 14 October 1987 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Austria 1–0 2–0 Euro 1988 qualifying
4. 18 November 1987 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Albania 3–0 5–0 Euro 1988 qualifying
5. 11 June 1988 Niedersachsenstadion, Hanover, Germany  Denmark 0–1 2–3 UEFA Euro 1988
6. 14 September 1988 Carlos Tartiere, Oviedo, Spain  Yugoslavia 1–0 1–2 Friendly
7. 21 December 1988 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Northern Ireland 3–0 4–0 1990 World Cup qualification
8. 22 January 1989 Ta' Qali, Attard, Malta  Malta 0–1 0–2 1990 World Cup qualification
9. 23 March 1989 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Malta 1–0 4–0 1990 World Cup qualification
10. 23 March 1989 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Malta 2–0 4–0 1990 World Cup qualification
11. 20 September 1989 Riazor, A Coruña, Spain  Poland 1–0 1–0 Friendly
12. 11 November 1989 Népstadion, Budapest, Hungary  Hungary 0–2 2–2 1990 World Cup qualification
13. 13 December 1989 Heliodoro Rodríguez, Tenerife, Spain  Switzerland 1–0 2–1 Friendly
14. 17 June 1990 Friuli, Udine, Italy  South Korea 1–0 3–1 1990 FIFA World Cup
15. 17 June 1990 Friuli, Udine, Italy  South Korea 2–1 3–1 1990 FIFA World Cup
16. 17 June 1990 Friuli, Udine, Italy  South Korea 3–1 3–1 1990 FIFA World Cup
17. 21 June 1990 Marc'Antonio Bentegodi, Verona, Italy  Belgium 0–1 1–2 1990 FIFA World Cup
18. 12 September 1990 El Molinón, Gijón, Spain  Brazil 3–0 3–0 Friendly
19. 13 November 1991 Sánchez Pizjuán, Seville, Spain  Czechoslovakia 2–1 2–1 Euro 1992 qualifying
20. 22 April 1992 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Albania 1–0 3–0 1994 World Cup qualification
21. 22 April 1992 Benito Villamarín, Seville, Spain  Albania 2–0 3–0 1994 World Cup qualification

Honours[edit]

Player[edit]

Real Madrid

Manager[edit]

Olympiacos

Individual[edit]

Club statistics[edit]

Club performance League Cup Total
Season Club League Apps Goals Apps Goals Apps Goals
Spain League Copa del Rey Total
1984–85 Real Madrid Spanish League 26 2 8 2 43 7
1985–86 31 7 5 0 48 9
1986–87 44 5 6 0 58 5
1987–88 35 14 7 1 50 19
1988–89 36 13 10 2 51 15
1989–90 37 8 6 0 46 10
1990–91 36 8 4 1 46 10
1991–92 38 11 6 3 54 16
1992–93 37 9 6 1 51 13
1993–94 37 11 4 1 47 14
1994–95 13 2 0 0 18 2
1995–96 33 6 1 1 42 8
Mexico League Cup Total
1996 Celaya Mexican League 17 6
1997 17 3
Total Spain 403 96 63 12 554 128
Mexico 34 9
Career total 437 105

References[edit]

External links[edit]