Michelle Duclos

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Michelle Duclos is a resident of Quebec, Canada and a supporter of the Quebec sovereignty movement. While employed as a performer on CFTM-TV in 1965, and a member of the Rassemblement pour l'Indépendance Nationale, she became involved in a plot to bomb the Statue of Liberty[1] in collusion with the Black Liberation Front, a militant Black Power group based in Harlem.

Radio and TV Career
1960-61 : C.J.L.R. - Québec
1962-63 : C.H.L.N.- Trois-Rivières
1963 : Télé-Métropole
1967-1973 : Liban, TV
End of 1973 : C.J.R.P.

Plot[edit]

The 26-year old Duclos, together with three men, Walter Augustus Bowe, Khaicel Sultan Sayyed and accused leader Robert Steele Collier, drove across the Canada–United States border into New York on February 16, 1965.[2] Driving Duclos' white 1961 Rambler, they were carrying a cardboard box filled with 30 sticks of dynamite.[2][3]

Unaware that the Canadian authorities had alerted the United States, who had asked NYPD officer Raymond A. Wood to act as an undercover agent,[2][4] the group decided to hide the dynamite in a vacant lot in Riverdale, the Bronx. Upon returning to retrieve the explosives, Bowe and Collier were immediately arrested. The rest of the group was arrested shortly afterwards.[5] She was given a 5-year suspended sentence.[6]

Aftermath[edit]

Her past actions have led to criticisms of her appointment to government positions since 1985, which included the Quebec Premier Bernard Landry's appointment of Duclos to the position of non-resident representative to Algeria of the province of Quebec in 2002.[6][7]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Other Militant Groups of American Culture, from the "American Colonization Society" website
  2. ^ a b c St. John, Philip A. "Battle for Leyte Gulf", Turner Publishing, 1996. p. 150.
  3. ^ The Monumental Plot
  4. ^ Beruvides, Estaban Cuban Terrorism in the United States in 1965
  5. ^ Terrorists Connected To Cuban Communist Government
  6. ^ a b Vigile Archives
  7. ^ Esteban Beruvides, Cuba: Anuario Historico 2001 Tomo 2