Michihiro Ogasawara

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Michihiro Ogasawara
Michihiro Ogasawara 2010.jpg
Chunichi Dragons – No. 36
Infielder
Bats: Left Throws: Right
Professional debut
1997 for the Nippon Ham Fighters
Career statistics
(through 2010)
Batting average .311
Home runs 377
Run batted in 1143
Teams
Career highlights and awards
Michihiro Ogasawara
WBC2006 Michihiro Ogasawara.jpg
Ogasawara played for Japan in the 2006 World Baseball Classic.
Medal record
Men's Baseball
Bronze Athens 2004 Team Competition
World Baseball Classic
Gold 2006 San Diego Team Competition
Gold 2009 Los Angeles Team Competition

Michihiro Ogasawara (小笠原 道大, born October 25, 1973 in Mihama-ku, Chiba, Chiba Prefecture, Japan) is a Japanese professional baseball player. He currently plays first base for the Chunichi Dragons in Japan's Central League. He played with the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters from 1997 to 2006.

Career[edit]

Ogasawara is one of the most consistent hitters in Japanese baseball. He won two consecutive batting titles from 2002-2003, and led the league in home runs and RBIs in 2006 to win the Pacific League MVP award. He led the league in hits from 2000-2001, and has won 6 Japanese Golden Glove awards at first base and third base. He participated in the 2004 Summer Olympics held in Athens, Greece, winning a bronze medal. He also played for the Japanese national team in the 2006 World Baseball Classic, where he hit a home run off Esteban Loaiza at Angel Stadium of Anaheim. In 2006, he helped the Hokkaido Nippon-Ham Fighters win their first Pacific League pennant since 1981, sweeping the Fukuoka SoftBank Hawks in the playoffs to reach the Japanese championship series against the Chunichi Dragons. The Fighters beat the Dragons in 5 games to win the Japanese championship series.

He became a free agent in 2006, and signed a four-year contract with the Yomiuri Giants during the off-season.

Career statistics[edit]

Nippon Professional Baseball
Year Age Team G AB R H 2B 3B HR TB RBI SB AVG
1997 24 Nippon-Ham 44 94 7 21 10 2 0 35 7 1 .223
1998 25 Nippon-Ham 71 86 7 26 5 0 1 34 9 1 .302
1999 26 Nippon-Ham 135 547 90 156 34 4 25 273 83 3 .285
2000 27 Nippon-Ham 135 554 126 182 23 4 31 306 102 24 .329
2001 28 Nippon-Ham 140 576 108 195 40 2 32 335 86 1 .339
2002 29 Nippon-Ham 135 486 77 165 27 2 32 292 81 8 .340
2003 30 Nippon-Ham 128 445 83 160 34 1 31 289 100 8 .360
2004 31 Nippon-Ham 101 377 78 130 19 2 18 207 70 3 .345
2005 32 Nippon-Ham 133 514 91 145 27 2 37 287 92 2 .282
2006 33 Nippon-Ham 135 496 77 155 31 1 32 284 100 4 .313
2007 34 Yomiuri 142 566 95 177 33 1 31 305 88 4 .313
2008 35 Yomiuri 144 520 93 161 27 1 36 298 96 0 .310
2009 36 Yomiuri 139 514 78 159 25 1 31 279 107 2 .309
2010 37 Yomiuri 137 510 83 157 24 1 34 285 90 1 .308
2011 38 Yomiuri 83 281 21 68 12 0 5 95 20 1 .242
2012 39 Yomiuri 34 92 4 14 3 0 0 17 4 0 .152
2013 40 Yomiuri 22 36 2 9 2 0 1 14 8 0 .250

Statistics current as of January 15, 2014

External links[edit]