Microlecture

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The term microlecture is NOT used here to refer to microcontent for microlearning, but to actual instructional content that is formatted for online and mobile learning using a constructivist approach. More specifically, as described in the Chronicle of Higher Education,[1] these are approximately 60 second presentations with a specific structure. They are not just brief (one minute) presentations: although Dr. McGrew had success with "one minute lectures"[2] at the University of Northern Iowa as did Dr. Kee [3] at the University of Leeds.

David M. Penrose (aka the One Minute Professor), an independent instructional designer and eLearning consultant, has articulated the process for creating these microlectures. As stated (Shea, 2009), these specific lectures are combined with specific activities designed to promote the epistemic engagement[4] of the learner. The response of the Higher Education community was mixed, with some positive[5][6][7][8][9][10][11][12][13][14][15] and some negative.[16]

The interest surrounding the use of microlectures has continued to grow, even outside of the United States, to places like Hong Kong University.[17] In the United States, the use of microlectures are even considered a vital part of the Pandemic Response Plans.[18] Additionally, even scholars at schools like Princeton University (Humanities Resource Center),[19] UNC's School of Government,[20] Humboldt State University,[21] University of West Florida,[22] and University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign[23] support the importance of an innovative teaching-learning approach for learners in the 21st century.

The popularity of the microlectures has been the focus of a recent (November 1, 2012) EDUCAUSE resource, the Educause Learning Initiative "7 Things You Should Know About" series.[24] The EDUCAUSE series is published monthly and dates back to May 1, 2005. In each issue, the focus addresses seven basic questions ...

What is it?
How does it work?
Who's doing it?
Why is it significant?
What are the downsides?
Where is it going?
What are the implications for higher education?

How to create a One Minute Lecture[edit]

Professors spend a lot of time crafting hourlong lectures. The prospect of boiling them down to 60 seconds — or even five minutes — may seem daunting. David Penrose, an independent course designer who developed San Juan College's microlectures, suggests that it can be done in five steps:

  • List the key concepts you are trying to convey in the 60-minute lecture.
    That series of phrases will form the core of your microlecture.
  • Write a 15 to 30-second introduction and conclusion.
    They will provide context for your key concepts.
  • Record these three elements using a microphone and Web camera.
    (Your information-technology department can provide advice and facilities.)
    If you want to produce an audio-only lecture, no Webcam is necessary.
    The finished product should be 60 seconds to three minutes long.
  • Design an assignment to follow the lecture that will direct students to readings or activities that allow them to explore the key concepts.
    Combined with a written assignment, that should allow students to learn the material.
  • Upload the video and assignment to your course-management software.

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Shieh, David. (2009). These lectures are gone in 60 seconds. Chronicle of Higher Education, 55(26), A1,A13.
  2. ^ McGrew, L. A. (1993). "A 60-second course in Organic Chemistry". Journal of Chemistry Education 70 (7): 543–544. doi:10.1021/ed070p543. 
  3. ^ Kee, T.P. (1995). "The one minute lecture". Education in Chemistry 32: 100–101. 
  4. ^ Shea, P.; Bidjerano, T. (2009). "Community of inquiry as a theoretical framework to foster "epistemic engagement" and "cognitive presence" in online education". Computers and Education 52 (3): 543–553. doi:10.1016/j.compedu.2008.10.007. 
  5. ^ Loginquitas, E. (2009, March 7). One-Minute Lectures?! Instructional Design Open Studio. Retrieved March 8, 2009, from http://id.ome.ksu.edu/blog/2009/mar/7/one-minute-lectures/
  6. ^ Lipowski, J. (2009, March 17). Microlectures turn lessons into interactive snippets. The State News, Retrieved on March 26, 2009 from http://statenews.com/index.php/article/2009/03/microlectures_turn_lessons_into_interactive_snippets
  7. ^ Robledo, L. (2009, March 18). Small school expands use of 'one-minute lectures'. Brown Daily Herald, 144(38), 5-6. Retrieved on March 26, 2009 from http://media.collegepublisher.com/media/paper472/documents/4758x8h8.pdf
  8. ^ Baltzer, J. (2009). "Online degrees evolve to meet new demands". Trustee Quarterly 32 (4): 34–35. 
  9. ^ Demski, J. (2009). Micro & Macro Video. Campus Technology, 23(3), 14,16
  10. ^ Crosslin, M. (2009, March 4). Microlectures: A constructivist's dream come true. EduGeek Journal. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from http://www.edugeekjournal.com/2009/03/04/microlectures-a-constructivists-dream-come-true/
  11. ^ Humboldt State University. (2009, October 8). Micro-lectures: Just-in-time teaching for critical topics and skills. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from http://www3.humboldt.edu/celt/tips/micro-lectures_just-in-time_teaching_for_critical_topics_and_skills/
  12. ^ Henninger, P. (2009). The Journal Editorial Report, March 7, 2009. Fox News. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,507165,00.html
  13. ^ Morris, L.V. (2009). "Little Lectures?". Innovative Higher Education 34 (2): 67–68. doi:10.1007/s10755-009-9108-1. 
  14. ^ DeCastro, S. (2010, April 22). Commentary: Using technology to improve access, success. Community College Times. Retrieved on November 5, 2012 from http://www.communitycollegetimes.com/Pages/Campus-Issues/Using-technology-to-improve-access-success.aspx
  15. ^ OIT. (2009, June 8). Microlectures. TechOIT. Retrieved on November 5, 2012 from http://blogs.umass.edu/teachoit/2009/06/09/microlectures/
  16. ^ Krajewski, B. (2009, March 3). Lilliputians of Higher Education Invent Microlectures. The Fourth Policeman. Retrieved March 4, from http://brucekrajewski.wordpress.com/2009/03/03/lilliputians-of-higher-education/
  17. ^ University of Hong Kong. (2009). Knowledge Team Meeting Minutes, April 24, 2009. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from http://lib.hku.hk/kt/kt-meeting-minutes-24_April_2009.doc
  18. ^ University of St. Thomas. (2009). Faculty Guide for Pandemic Planning. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from http://www.stthomas.edu/irt/forfaculty/pandemicplan/default.html
  19. ^ Brady, A. (2009, March 9). Microlectures in distance and online learning. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from https://blogs.princeton.edu/hrc/2009/03/microlectures_in_distance_and_online_learning.html
  20. ^ Cunningham, C. (2009, March 8). Micro-lectures: A cure for content bloat. Teaching and Learning Support. Retrieved on January 21, 2010 from http://sogweb.sog.unc.edu/blogs/tls/?p=483
  21. ^ HSU. (2011, October 13). Microlectures by Joan Van Duzer: Just-in-time teaching for critical topics and skills. Retrieved on November 5, 2012 from http://www.humboldt.edu/celt/tips/micro-lectures_just-in-time_teaching_for_critical_topics_and_skills/
  22. ^ Center for Academic Technologies. (2009, April 7). Microlectures. Retrieved on November 5, 2012 from http://uwf.edu/cutla/micro-lectures.cfm
  23. ^ CITES Academic Technology Services. (2012, July 19). A microlectures workshop. Retrieved on November 5, 2012 from http://www.library.uiuc.edu/blog/infolit/2012/07/microlecture_workshop.html
  24. ^ EDUCAUSE. (2012). 7 Things You Should Know About MICROLECTURES. Retrieved on November 2, 2012 from http://www-cdn.educause.edu/ir/library/pdf/ELI7090.pdf