Middletown South Green Historic District

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Middletown South Green Historic District
PostcardSouthMainStMiddletownCT1907.jpg
From a 1907 postcard: "Our streets here are extra wide, plenty of grass between walks and curbs. Beautiful old trees. Packs of love and greetings to all, Carl"
Location Union Park area, on S. Main, Crescent, Pleasant, and Church Sts., Middletown, Connecticut
Coordinates 41°33′22″N 72°38′56″W / 41.556°N 72.649°W / 41.556; -72.649Coordinates: 41°33′22″N 72°38′56″W / 41.556°N 72.649°W / 41.556; -72.649
Area 90 acres (36 ha)
Architect Multiple
Architectural style Second Empire, Italianate, and Gothic Revival
Governing body Private and Local
NRHP Reference # 75001922[1]
Added to NRHP August 12, 1975

Located in Middletown, Connecticut, the Middletown South Green Historic District was created to preserved the historic character of the city's South Green and the historic buildings that surround it. It is a 90-acre (36 ha) historic district that was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1975. It includes Second Empire, Italianate, and Gothic Revival architecture. When listed, the district included 19 critical contributing buildings, 11 additional contributing buildings and one non-essential contributing building (the synagogue).[1]

The area includes the Union Park, an open green area, and properties around it and down South Main Street and other streets.[2]

One property, the Caleb Fuller House at the corner of Main and Church streets, is also included in the Metro South Historic District[3]

South Green Historic District inventory[edit]

Based on the NRHP nomination inventory except as explicitly noted:[4]

  • 14 Church Street (now 14 Old Church Street[5]), Doolittle's Funeral Home, Queen Anne with hexagonal turret, 1890s, critical contributing property
  • (unnumbered) Church Street (now 24 Old Church Street[6]), Methodist Parish House, Second Empire, 1880s (or 1868-1869[7]), critical contributing property
  • First United Methodist Church (no address, on Church Street, now Old Church Street), 1936 (or 1930-1931[8]), critical contributing property
  • (unnumbered) Church Street (now 8 Broad Street, corner of Church [9]), Synagogue (Congregation Adath Israel[9]), brick blocklike structure with low dome, non-essential contributing property
  • 38 South Main Street (now 11 South Main Street[10]), 1811-1813, Federal style with Greek Revival embellishments, Mather-Douglas House (or Mather-Douglas-Santangelo House[11]), critical contributing property
  • 29 South Main Street, 1880-1890, Italianate, critical contributing property
  • 27 South Main Street, 1880-1890, Italianate with belvedere, contributing property
  • 65 South Main Street, 1880-1890, Italianate, critical contributing property
  • 63 South Main Street, 1880-1890, Italianate with wrought iron porch, critical contributing property
  • 61 South Main Street, 1880-1890, Italianate, contributing property
  • 40 South Main Street, 1880-1890, plain, multi-gabled rambling house, contributing property
  • 36 South Main Street, 1790-1800, Michael's Beauty Salon, 3-bay, 5 course brick band, box cornice, gable roof, contributing property
  • 34 & 32 South Main Street, 1880-1890, double bay projections, pediment dormers, large porch, contributing property
  • 22 South Main Street,[12] D'Angelo's Funeral Home, early 1900s (1902[7]), 5-bay, gambrel roof house with Georgian symmetry, contributing property
  • 33 Pleasant Street, White-Stoddard House,[13] 1870-1880 (1870[7]), Second Empire, brick, critical contributing property. Now Masonic Temple Building.[14]
  • 27 Pleasant Street,[12] Hayes-Chaffe House,[13] 1870-1880 (1872-1873[15] or Rockwell-Sumner House,[13] 1750, 5-bay, double overhang, Colonial Georgian, critical contributing property
  • 19[16] & 17 Pleasant Street (now 15 Pleasant Street[17]), Smith-Stiles House,[18] 1870-1880 (1870-1871[7]), Second Empire, double house, critical contributing property
  • (no number) Pleasant Street (or 9 Pleasant Street[19]), South Congregational Church, 1868, Gothic Revival with spire, critical contributing property
  • 57[16]-83 Main Street Extension, 1870-1880, Second Empire Apartment House, critical contributing property
  • 55 Crescent Street, Wilcox-Meech House,[13] 1880-1890 (1871[7]), Italianate, 3-story brick with belvedere, critical contributing property [20]
  • 49 Crescent Street, George R. Finley House,[13] 1880-1890 (1872-1873[7]), Italianate with mansard roof, critical contributing property
  • 43 Crescent Street, 1890-1900, 2 story, 3-bay with gable front, side bay projection, contributing property[21]
  • 41 Crescent Street, 1880-1890, gingerbread, stick style Victorian, critical contributing property[22]
  • 33 Crescent Street, 1890-1900, very plain Gothic, contributing property
  • 31 & 29 Crescent Street, 1870-1880, large scale, Second Empire, contributing property
  • 15 Crescent Street, 1870-1880 (1877[7]), Queen Anne, stick style with barge board and turret, contributing property
  • 11 Crescent Street, 1900, large rambling multi-gable house, contributing property
  • 4 Crescent Street, 1880-1890, Queen Anne, critical contributing property
  • 8 Crescent Street, 1880-1890, Victorian stick style, critical contributing property

The map in the NRHP nomination also clearly shows the property at 49 Main Street (corner of Old Church Street) where the Caleb Fuller house now stands as being inside the district.[23] That house was moved to its current location in the 1970s.[24]

Pictures[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. 
  2. ^ Christine B. Brockmeyer (sp?) (July 1, 1975). "NRHP Inventory-Nomination: Middletown South Green Historic District". National Park Service.  and Accompanying 14 photos from 1975 (see photo map on next-to-last page of text document)
  3. ^ David F. Ransom (April 29, 1978). "NRHP Inventory-Nomination: Metro South Historic District / See Also:South Green National Register District". National Park Service.  and Accompanying 15 photos, from 1978 (see photo map page 15 of text document)
  4. ^ Inventory in NRHP Inventory-Nomination, as cited above.
  5. ^ (Home page), Doolittle Funeral Service, Inc. Accessed 14 May 2012.
  6. ^ Sources such as Churches and Places of Worship on the official cityofmiddletown.com (accessed 14 May 2012) indicates that this is now "Old Church Street". File:Middletown, CT - First United Methodist Church pano 01.jpg clearly shows that the number "24" is on the parish house, not the church itself.
  7. ^ a b c d e f g Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources, City of Middletown Department of Planning Preservation and Development, middletownplanning.com (accessed 14 May 2012), gives this date.
  8. ^ While the NRHP nomination says File:Middletown, CT - First United Methodist Church pano 01.jpg clearly shows the date 1930 on the cornerstone. Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources, City of Middletown Department of Planning Preservation and Development, middletownplanning.com (accessed 14 May 2012), gives 1931.
  9. ^ a b Contact Us, Congregation Adath Israel. Accessed 14 May 2012.
  10. ^ List of sites, "Escape on the Underground Railroad", ctfreedomtrail.org. Accessed 14 May 2012.
  11. ^ NRHP Inventory-Nomination, as cited above, p. 6 of PDF.
  12. ^ a b First digit illegible in [online copy of NRHP nomination] accessed 14 May 2012, but address is also given in Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources.
  13. ^ a b c d e Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources, City of Middletown Department of Planning Preservation and Development, middletownplanning.com (accessed 14 May 2012), gives this name.
  14. ^ Lodge Directory Sorted By Location, Connecticut Freemasons (ctfreemasons.net), accessed 14 May 2012; this also confirms the address, which is missing its first digit in the inventory. Also confirmed by photos accompanying nomination: PDF p. 19-20.
  15. ^ NRHP Inventory-Nomination, as cited above, p. 2 of PDF. This also confirms the house number, which is missing its first digit in the inventory.
  16. ^ a b Caution on citation: first digit illegible in [online copy of NRHP nomination] accessed 14 May 2012.
  17. ^ photos accompanying nomination: PDF p. 18-19 shows what seems rather clearly this house at #15, so it may well have been 15 Pleasant Street even in 1975. File:Middletown, CT - 15 Pleasant St 01.jpg (2012) is the same house, now rooming house Hogan House. Cassandra Day, Deceased Inmate Was Center of High-Profile Murder Case, Middletown Patch, 28 March 2012 ties together "Hogan House" and 15 Pleasant Street. Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources also gives the address as #15
  18. ^ Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources
  19. ^ Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources, City of Middletown Department of Planning Preservation and Development, middletownplanning.com (accessed 14 May 2012), gives this address.
  20. ^ NRHP Inventory-Nomination, as cited above, p. 2 of PDF confirms the house number, which is missing its first digit in the inventory. Also confirmed by File:Middletown, CT - 55 Crescent St 01.jpg
  21. ^ This may be the same property that Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources, City of Middletown Department of Planning Preservation and Development, middletownplanning.com (accessed 14 May 2012) refers to as 45 Crescent Street and dates as late 19th century.
  22. ^ This may be the same property that Greater Middletown Preservation Trust's Inventory of Historical and Architectural Resources, City of Middletown Department of Planning Preservation and Development, middletownplanning.com (accessed 14 May 2012) refers to as 35-41 Crescent Street and dates as late 19th century.
  23. ^ NRHP Inventory-Nomination, as cited above, p. 10 of PDF.
  24. ^ David F. Ransom (April 29, 1978). "NRHP Inventory-Nomination: Metro South Historic District". National Park Service.  and Accompanying 15 photos, from 1978 (see photo map page 15 of text document)