Midland Railway 700 Class

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Midland Railway 700 Class
Bournville Locomotive Depot ancient ex-Midland double-framed 0-6-0 geograph-2805238-by-Ben-Brooksbank.jpg
No. 22846 at Bournville Locomotive Depot 27 July 1947
Type and origin
Power type Steam
Designer Matthew Kirtley
Builder Derby Works (26)
Dübs & Co. (150)
John Fowler & Co. (10)
Kitson & Co. (10)
Neilson & Co. (40)
Vulcan Foundry (80)
Build date 1869–1874
Total produced 316
Specifications
Configuration 0-6-0
UIC classification C n2
Gauge 4 ft 8 12 in (1,435 mm)
Driver diameter 5 ft 2 12 in (1.588 m)
Locomotive weight 36 long tons 0 cwt (80,600 lb or 36.6 t)
Fuel type Coal
Boiler pressure 140 lbf/in2 (965 kPa)
Heating surface:
– Total
1,100 sq ft (100 m2)
Cylinders Two, inside
Cylinder size 17 in × 24 in (432 mm × 610 mm)
Career
Operator(s) MRLMSBR
FS
Class MR: 700
LMS: 1F
FS: 380
Power class 1F
Disposition All scrapped

The Midland Railway 700 Class was a large class of double framed 0-6-0 freight steam locomotives designed by Matthew Kirtley for the Midland Railway. They were in the power classification 1F.

Early withdrawals[edit]

Six locomotives - nos. 271/9, 1007/31/52/3 - were withdrawn from service between 1903 and 1905.[1] Fifty more were sold in 1906 to the Italian State Railway, Ferrovie dello Stato (FS), where they formed FS Class 380; they had been ordered by one of the constituents of the FS, the Rete Mediterranea.[2]

Numbering[edit]

After the Midland Railway's 1907 renumbering scheme, the numbers were:

  • 2592–2671, 2674–2711 and 2713–2867[3]

Numbers 2672/3 were members of the 480 Class; no. 2712 was a member of the 240 Class,[4] which had been given a number in the wrong series as the result of a clerk's error.[5]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 3 December 1892, locomotive No. 871 was hauling a freight train that crashed at Wymondham Junction, Leicestershire, severely damaging the signal box.[6]

Military service[edit]

78 locomotives of the class were loaned to the War Department during the First World War and were used by the Railway Operating Division of the Royal Engineers for military duties in France. A further three were selected to go but instead were loaned to the London & South Western Railway between December 1917 and February 1920 The locomotives allocated were 2707–11/13–88 of which 2783–85 were sent to the LSWR.[7] The remainder went to France at various dates in 1917 before being returned to the MR in 1919–20.[8] All returned to service with the MR except 2765 which was scrapped at Derby in 1920 having suffered broken frames during its time with the ROD.[9] One engine, 2717, was cut off in No man's land during the Battle of Cambrai in November 1917 and was subsequently captured by the German army during Operation Michael. The Germans salvaged the engine and utilised it on their military railway in the Brussels area. Recovered after the war the engine was returned to the MR.[10]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Hunt, Essery & James 2002, pp. 70–71.
  2. ^ Hunt, Essery & James 2002, p. 94.
  3. ^ Hunt, Essery & James 2002, pp. 9, 11.
  4. ^ Hunt, Essery & James 2002, p. 9.
  5. ^ Hunt, Essery & James 2002, p. 101, note 9.
  6. ^ Earnshaw 1990, p. 6.
  7. ^ Aves 2009, p. 146.
  8. ^ Aves 2009, pp. 157–158.
  9. ^ Aves 2009, p. 147.
  10. ^ Aves 2009, pp. 146–147.

References[edit]

  • Aves, William (2009). The Railway Operating Division on the Western Front. Donnington, Lincolnshire: Shaun Tyas. ISBN 978-1-900289-993. 
  • Baxter, Bertram (1982). Baxter, David, ed. British Locomotive Catalogue 1825–1923, Volume 3A: Midland Railway and its constituent companies. Ashbourne, Derbyshire: Moorland Publishing Company. 
  • Earnshaw, Alan (1990). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 6. Penryn: Atlantic Books. ISBN 0-906899-37-0. 
  • Hunt, David; Essery, R.J.; James, Fred (2002). Midland Engines: No. 4 - The '700' Class Double-frame Goods Engines. Didcot: Wild Swan Publications. ISBN 1-874103-73-9.