Midland Railway Johnson 0-6-0

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The Midland Railway Johnson 0-6-0 were a class of locomotives serving Britain's Midland Railway system in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. Between 1875 and 1908 the Midland Railway, under the control of locomotive superintendents Samuel W. Johnson and Richard Deeley, ordered 935 goods tender engines of 0-6-0 type, both from the railway's own shops at Derby and various external suppliers. Although there were many (mostly small) variations between different batches both as delivered and as successively rebuilt, all 935 can be regarded as a single series, one of the largest classes of engine on Britain's railways. The locomotives served as late as 1964, but none of them now survive.

Builders[edit]

Ex-Midland 2F No. 3561 at Willesden Locomotive Depot 27 April 1946

They were built at the following plants:

Derby Works 160
Beyer, Peacock and Company 80
Dübs and Company 150
Kitson and Company 120
Neilson and Company 290
Robert Stephenson and Company 30
Sharp, Stewart and Company 85
Vulcan Foundry 20

Boilers[edit]

The H and H1 boilers fitted to the "2736" and "3815" classes were larger, having a diameter of 4 ft 8in rather than 4 ft 1in, and a longer firebox, which made the engines more powerful. While these were being built there started a program of rebuilding many of the earlier engines (but not the first 2 classes) with the "H" boiler to increase their power. By 1915, 380 engines had been so upgraded, giving 450 with "H" and 485 with "B".

Beginning in 1916 engines were rebuilt with Belpaire boilers. Those from the first two classes ("1142" & "1357"), (none of which had received an "H") received the smaller "G6" type boiler (similar size to the "B"), the remainder the larger "G7" size (similar size to the "H"). The "H" & "G7" boilered engines were classed "3" (later "3F") and those with "B" & "G6" boilers were classed "2" (later "2F").

By 1925, production of the new superheated 4F 0-6-0s meant there was no shortage of goods engines of this power class, and from that point only "G6" boilers were installed on rebuilding, sometimes on engines which had previously had "H" boilers, reducing them back to class 2. Three of the later examples were experimentally fitted with superheaters from 1923 to 1928, but generally the class remained saturated throughout. One-hundred thirteen engines remained with their original "B" boilers until scrapped, 22 had "H" boilers, 432 had "G7" and 368 had "G6".

Dimensions[edit]

As built[edit]

Class Pre-1907
numbers
Post-1907
numbers
Manufacturer Date Quantity
built
Driving
Wheels
Cylinders Boiler Notes
1142 1142–1251
381–385, 400–404
2900–3019 Kitson & Co. (30)
Dübs & Co. (30)
Beyer, Peacock & Co. (30)
Neilson & Co. (30)
1875–1876 120 4′ 10½″ 17½″ × 26″ B - 140 psi [1] later had 18″ × 26″ cylinders; BR 58114–58187
1357 1357–1376
1432–1471
1582–1631
3020–3129 Dübs & Co. (20)
R. Stephenson & Co. (30)
Beyer, Peacock & Co. (50)
Derby Works (10)
1878–1884 110 5′ 2½″ 17½″ × 26″ B - 140 psi [2] later had 18″ × 26″ cylinders; BR 58188–58228
1698 1698–1717
1758–1797
3130–3189 Derby Works 1885–1888 60 4′ 10½″ 18″ × 26″ B - 140 psi [3]
1798 1798–1807 3190–3199 Derby Works 1888 10 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ B - 140 psi [4]
Neilson Goods 1873–1972 3200–3299 Neilson & Co. 1890–1891 100 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ B - 150 psi [5] Collectively, the "1873" class.
J 2023–2092 3300–3369 Kitson & Co. (40)
Dübs & Co. (30)
1890–1892 70 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ B - 150 psi
J2 2133–2182 3410–3459 Dübs & Co. 1892–1894 50 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ B - 150 psi
M 2093–2132
361–370
2259–2358
2391–2420
2461–2500
2541–2570
2641–2735
3370–3409
3460–3764
Sharp, Stewart & Co. (85)
Derby Works (10)
Neilson & Co. (75)
Kitson & Co. (50)
Neilson, Reid & Co. (85)
Dübs & Co. (20)
Vulcan Foundry (20)
1892–1902 345 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ B - 160 psi
2736 2736–2740
240–244
3765–3774 Derby Works 1903 10 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ H - 175 psi [6]
245–284 3775–3814 Derby Works 1903–1906 40 5′ 2½″ 18½″ × 26″ H - 175 psi [7]
3815 3815–3834 Derby Works 1908 20 5′ 2½″ 18½″ × 26″ H1 - 175 psi [8]

The smaller driving wheels gave an enhanced tractive effort at the expense of reduced speed, which was useful on coal (and other mineral) trains.

Later dimensions[edit]

Numbers Class Weight Boiler pressure Driving wheels Cylinders Tractive effort
2900–3019 2F 40 tons 160 psi 4′ 10½″ 18″ × 26″ 19420 lbf
3020–3129 2F 40 tons 160 psi 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ 18185 lbf
3130–3189 2F 40 tons 160 psi 4′ 10½″ 18″ × 26″ 19420 lbf
3F 43 tons 17 cwt 175 psi 4′ 10½″ 18″ × 26″ 21240 lbf
3190–3774 2F 40 tons 160 psi 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ 18185 lbf
3F 43 tons 17 cwt 175 psi 5′ 2½″ 18″ × 26″ 19890 lbf
3775–3834 3F 46 tons 3 cwt 175 psi 5′ 2½″ 18½″ × 26″ 21010 lbf

Use on joint lines[edit]

16 engines of the "M" class were bought by the Midland and Great Northern Joint Railway, eight in 1896 and eight in 1899, which were numbered 58–73.[9] All were built with Class "B" boilers (4 ft 3 in (1,300 mm) diameter over the largest ring, round-top firebox), and replacement boilers were normally of the same type;[10] but two (nos. 62 and 69) were rebuilt in 1906 and 1909 with the larger Class "H" boiler (4 ft 9 18 in (1,451 mm) diameter over the largest ring, round-top).[11] In 1921, two others (nos. 68 and 71) were rebuilt with the Belpaire Class "G7" boiler (4 ft 9 18 in (1,451 mm) diameter, Belpaire firebox) together with longer smokeboxes, which required the main frames to be extended at both front and rear. The two already fitted with Class "H" boilers received "G7" boilers and frame extensions in 1923 and 1928.[12] All 16 were acquired by the London and North Eastern Railway (LNER) on 1 October 1936 and new numbers 058–073 were allocated, but five (nos. 63, 66, 67, 68, 72) were considered to be worn out and withdrawn in 1936–37, and three of these (nos. 66, 67, 72) did not receive their LNER numbers. The remaining eleven were added to LNER book stock in 1937 and classified J40 if fitted with the Class "B" boiler, or J41 if fitted with the Class "G7" boiler.[13] Withdrawal of these 11 began in 1938, and by the time that the LNER renumbering scheme was prepared in June 1943, there were five left, nos. 059, 064, 065, 070 and 071.[14] These were allotted numbers 4100–4, but none lasted long enough to be renumbered: the last, no. 059, was withdrawn in June 1944.[15]

Ten engines of "M" class were bought by the Somerset and Dorset Joint Railway in 1896 and 1902, numbered 62–66 and 72–76. All ended up with "G7" boilers and were taken into LMS stock as class 3F in 1930.

Numbering[edit]

LMS[edit]

The class all retained their numbers when they passed to the London, Midland and Scottish Railway (LMS) at the 1923 grouping, but in 1934 2900–2984 (all class 2F) had 20000 added to their numbers to make way for newer locomotives. The same happened to 3000–3019 in 1947.

British Railways[edit]

At nationalisation those that were class 3F, along with other LMS locomotives, had 40000 added to their numbers by British Railways, but the class 2Fs were reorganised into a new series 58114–58310.[16]

Accidents and incidents[edit]

  • On 1 December 1900, locomotive No. 1433 was hauling a freight train when it was derailed at Peckwash, Derbyshire, possibly after the driver lost control and the train ran away.[17]
  • On 14 August 1949, locomotive No. 3260 was hauling a passenger train when it collided with a peat train at Ashcott, Somerset and was derailed. The locomotive was subsequently scrapped.[18]

Withdrawal[edit]

Withdrawal of the engines from service began in 1925, starting with unrebuilt engines, and continued until 1964. Despite the large number of locomotives of the class and their late survival, none were preserved.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Baxter 1982, pp. 149–153.
  2. ^ Baxter 1982, p. p153–156.
  3. ^ Baxter 1982, pp. 156–157.
  4. ^ Baxter 1982, p. 157.
  5. ^ Baxter 1982, pp. 157–170.
  6. ^ Baxter 1982, pp. 170–171.
  7. ^ Baxter 1982, pp. 171–172.
  8. ^ Baxter 1982, p. 172.
  9. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, p. 51.
  10. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, pp. 52–53.
  11. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, p. 53.
  12. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, pp. 53–54.
  13. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, pp. 51–52.
  14. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, pp. 52, 56–57.
  15. ^ Boddy et al. 1982, pp. 56–57.
  16. ^ Ian Allan ABC of British Railways Locomotives, 1948 Edition, part 3, pp 10–16 and 50–51
  17. ^ Trevena 1981, pp. 19-20.
  18. ^ Trevena 1980, p. 44.
  • Baxter, Bertram (1982). Baxter, David, ed. British Locomotive Catalogue 1825–1923, Volume 3A: Midland Railway and its constituent companies. Ashbourne, Derbyshire: Moorland Publishing Company. 
  • Boddy, M.G.; Neve, E.; Tee, D.F.; Yeadon, W.B. (September 1982). Fry, E.V., ed. Locomotives of the L.N.E.R., part 6A: Tender Engines - Classes J38 to K5. Kenilworth: RCTS. ISBN 0-901115-53-3. 
  • Essery, R.J.; Jenkinson, D. An Illustrated Review of Midland Railway Locomotives, Vol.4. Wild Swan. ISBN 0-906867-74-6. 
  • Summerson, S. Midland Railway Locomotives, Vol.4. Irwell Press. ISBN 1-903266-26-2. 
  • Trevena, Arthur (1980). Trains in Trouble. Vol. 1. Redruth: Atlantic Books. ISBN 0-906899-01-X. 
  • Trevena, Arthur (1981). Trains in Trouble: Vol. 2. Redruth: Atlantic Books. ISBN 0-906899-03-6.