Mienoumi Tsuyoshi

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Mienoumi Tsuyoshi
三重ノ海 剛司
Mienoumi 2010.JPG
Personal information
Born Gorō Ishiyama
(1948-02-04) February 4, 1948 (age 66)
Matsusaka, Mie, Japan
Height 1.81 m (5 ft 11 12 in)
Weight 135 kg (298 lb)
Career
Stable Dewanoumi
Record 695-525-56 (1 draw)
Debut July, 1963
Highest rank Yokozuna (July, 1979)
Retired November, 1980
Championships 3 (Makuuchi)
1 (Sandanme)
Special Prizes Outstanding Performance (5)
Fighting Spirit (1)
Technique (3)
Gold Stars 5 (Wajima (2), Kitanoumi,
Kotozakura, Kitanofuji)
* Up to date as of August 2007.

Mienoumi Tsuyoshi (三重ノ海 剛司 Mienoumi Tsuyoshi?) (born February 4, 1948 as Gorō Ishiyama (石山五郎 Ishiyama Gorō?) is a former champion sumo wrestler, the 57th yokozuna of the sport. He is the founder of Musashigawa stable and a former chairman of the Japan Sumo Association. He was born in Matsusaka, Mie, Japan.

Career[edit]

His father was a construction worker who competed in amateur sumo tournaments.[1] The young Mienoumi did judo at junior high school and was introduced to a coach at Dewanoumi stable, but was initially rejected due to his short stature.[1] He contacted the stable again a few years later, and this time was accepted by Dewanoumi Oyataka himself, the former Dewanohana Kuniichi.[1] His first bout was in July 1963, aged just 15. At first fighting under his family name of Ishiyama, he switched to the shikona of Mienoumi in 1966. After being personally trained by the new Dewanoumi Oyakaya, former yokozuna Sadanoyama,[1] he developed his technique and was promoted to jūryō division in March 1969, and makuuchi, the top division, in September 1969. In July of the following year, he reached the rank of komusubi, defeating two yokozuna (Taihō and Tamanoumi) and receiving his first prize (shukun-shō). He was promoted to sekiwake in the next tournament in September 1970.

He suffered from a chronic liver problem throughout his career, and although he tried to keep it under control by changing his diet, it was a factor in his eventual retirement.[1]

In September 1974 his 11th day match with Futagodake was declared a draw (hikiwake). This is the last draw in the top division to date.

He won his first makuuchi tournament or yusho in November 1975 and was promoted to ōzeki the following January. He lost a majority of bouts in the next two tournaments, resulting in an automatic demotion back to sekiwake, but a good result of 10 wins to 5 losses in the next tournament was sufficient to restore him to ōzeki.

In May 1979 he was a runner-up for the fourth time, to Wakanohana with a 13-2 record. He followed that up with a superb 14-1 record in the following tournament, defeating Wakanohana, Kitanoumi and Wajima, only losing the championship in a playoff to Wajima on the final day. In September 1979 he was finally promoted to yokozuna. The 97 tournaments it took him to do so is the slowest ever progress to sumo's top rank. His oyakata declared that he would be happy with just one more yūshō before Mienoumi's retirement.[1] In the event, Mienoumi won his second and third tournaments as yokozuna, the latter with a perfect score, but after this had several absences due to injury and illness, fighting a full fifteen bouts in only four tournaments as yokozuna, before retiring in November 1980. He has the lowest win-loss ratio of any post-war yokozuna.

After retirement[edit]

Upon retirement Mienoumi took the name of Musashigawa Oyakata and established Musashigawa stable in 1981. Until then Dewanoumi stable had discouraged any breaking away, and he was the first from Dewanoumi in 62 years to amicably set up a new stable.[1] By 2000 Musashigawa stable had become one of the strongest stables in sumo with a yokozuna, Musashimaru, and three ōzeki, Dejima, Musōyama and Miyabiyama. Musashigawa performed an early kanreki dohyō-iri in 2007 (normally performed on a yokozuna's 60th birthday) to mark the 25th anniversary of the founding of Musashigawa stable.[2] On September 8, 2008, he became the chairman of the Japan Sumo Association following the resignation of Kitanoumi.[3] One of his first actions was to demand a controversial tightening up of the rules for the tachi-ai, or initial charge, which led to many false starts in the September 2008 tournament.[4] Following a series of scandals involving wrestlers gambling and associating with organised crime members, he was suspended for the July 2010 tournament and announced his resignation the following month. He also cited health concerns, as he had been undergoing treatment for stomach cancer.[5] In September 2010 he also stood down as head of Musashigawa stable, although he remained a coach there. Former ōzeki Musōyama is now head coach of what is now Fujishima stable.[6] In December 2012 he announced that the former Musashimaru would inherit his elder name when Musashigawa reached 65 years of age in February 2013.[7] He is now director of the Sumo Museum at the Kokugikan.

Career record[edit]

Mienoumi Tsuyoshi[8]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
1963 x x x (Maezumo) (Maezumo) East Jonokuchi #30
4–3
 
1964 East Jonidan #102
4–3
 
West Jonidan #81
3–4
 
West Jonidan #98
2–1–4
 
East Jonidan #112
5–2
 
East Jonidan #57
3–4
 
West Jonidan #66
3–4
 
1965 West Jonidan #88
5–2
 
East Jonidan #39
2–5
 
East Jonidan #61
5–2
 
East Jonidan #8
3–4
 
East Jonidan #13
4–3
 
West Sandanme #88
5–2
 
1966 East Sandanme #52
1–6
 
West Sandanme #83
2–5
 
East Jonidan #10
3–3–1
 
East Jonidan #23
5–2
 
East Sandanme #80
5–2
 
East Sandanme #39
4–3
 
1967 East Sandanme #30
5–2
 
West Makushita #98
4–3
 
East Sandanme #27
5–2
 
West Makushita #57
3–4
 
East Sandanme #5
7–0
Champion

 
East Makushita #11
3–4
 
1968 West Makushita #15
3–4
 
East Makushita #18
4–3
 
West Makushita #13
4–3
 
West Makushita #8
4–3
 
West Makushita #6
2–5
 
West Makushita #16
6–1
 
1969 East Makushita #5
6–1
 
East Jūryō #12
9–6
 
West Jūryō #7
10–5
 
East Jūryō #3
9–6
 
East Maegashira #11
8–7
 
East Maegashira #5
8–7
 
1970 West Maegashira #3
4–11
 
West Maegashira #9
8–7
 
West Maegashira #6
11–4
 
West Komusubi #1
8–7
O
West Sekiwake
6–9
 
West Maegashira #1
5–10
 
1971 West Maegashira #3
6–9
 
West Maegashira #4
5–10
 
East Maegashira #11
10–5
 
West Maegashira #3
7–8
 
East Maegashira #4
10–5
F
West Komusubi #1
11–4
T
1972 East Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #2
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #2
9–6
 
East Sekiwake #2
5–2–8
 
East Maegashira #1
4–11
 
East Maegashira #7
8–7
 
1973 West Maegashira #3
11–4
O
West Komusubi #1
10–5
T
West Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
West Sekiwake #1
4–11
 
West Maegashira #2
8–7
West Maegashira #1
4–11
 
1974 East Maegashira #6
8–7
 
West Maegashira #3
8–7
 
East Maegashira #1
5–9–1
 
West Maegashira #5
5–10
 
West Maegashira #10
11–3–1draw
 
East Maegashira #2
5–10
 
1975 West Maegashira #6
10–5
O
East Maegashira #1
11–4
O
West Sekiwake #1
9–6
 
East Sekiwake #1
8–7
 
East Sekiwake #2
11–4
 
East Sekiwake #1
13–2
OT
1976 East Ōzeki #1
8–7
 
West Ōzeki #1
2–6–7
 
East Ōzeki #2
2–8–5
 
West Sekiwake #2
10–5
 
East Ōzeki #2
9–6
 
East Ōzeki #2
8–7
 
1977 East Ōzeki #2
8–7
 
West Ōzeki #2
8–7
 
East Ōzeki #3
5–10
 
East Ōzeki #3
8–7
 
West Ōzeki #2
7–8
 
West Ōzeki #2
9–6
 
1978 East Ōzeki #2
10–5
 
West Ōzeki #1
8–7
 
East Ōzeki #2
11–4
 
East Ōzeki #1
9–6
 
East Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
East Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
1979 East Ōzeki #1
11–4
 
East Ōzeki #1
10–5
 
East Ōzeki #1
13–2
 
East Ōzeki #1
14–1–P
 
East Yokozuna #2
11–4
 
West Yokozuna #1
14–1
 
1980 East Yokozuna #1
15–0
 
East Yokozuna #1
1–4–10
 
West Yokozuna #2
10–5
 
West Yokozuna #2
4–6–5
 
East Yokozuna #2
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
West Yokozuna #2
Retired
0–3
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g Kuroda, Joe (October 2008). "Rikishi of Old". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 12 February 2008. 
  2. ^ 武蔵川親方が土俵入り 来年2月で還暦に (in Japanese). 47NEWS. 2007-06-16. Retrieved 2012-10-02. 
  3. ^ Buckton, Mark (2008-09-10). "Sumo struggles as Aki Basho approaches". The Japan Times. Retrieved 2012-10-06. 
  4. ^ Gould, Chris (October 2008). "Tachi-ai:touchy, aye?". Sumo Fan Magazine. Retrieved 12 February 2009. 
  5. ^ "High hopes for new sumo chief". The Japan Times. 2010-08-18. Retrieved 2012-10-02. 
  6. ^ "Sumo Beya Guide - Fujishima Beya". Nihon Sumo Kyokai. 2012-08-27. Retrieved 2012-10-02. 
  7. ^ "Former yokozuna Musashimaru to open stable next year". Japan Times. 22 December 2012. Retrieved 1 January 2013. 
  8. ^ "Mienoumi Tsuyoshi Rikishi Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 2012-07-27. 

External links[edit]

Previous:
Wakanohana Kanji II
57th Yokozuna
1979 - 1980
Next:
Chiyonofuji Mitsugu
Yokozuna is not a successive rank, and more than one wrestler can share the title
Sporting positions
Preceded by
Kitanoumi Toshimitsu
Chairman of the Japan Sumo Association
2008–2010
Succeeded by
Kaiketsu Masateru