Mieses Opening

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Mieses Opening
a b c d e f g h
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
b8 black knight
c8 black bishop
d8 black queen
e8 black king
f8 black bishop
g8 black knight
h8 black rook
a7 black pawn
b7 black pawn
c7 black pawn
d7 black pawn
e7 black pawn
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black pawn
d3 white pawn
a2 white pawn
b2 white pawn
c2 white pawn
e2 white pawn
f2 white pawn
g2 white pawn
h2 white pawn
a1 white rook
b1 white knight
c1 white bishop
d1 white queen
e1 white king
f1 white bishop
g1 white knight
h1 white rook
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h
Moves 1.d3
ECO A00
Named after Jacques Mieses
Parent Irregular opening

The Mieses Opening is a chess opening that begins with the move:

1. d3

The opening is named after the German-British grandmaster Jacques Mieses. It is considered an irregular opening, so it is classified under the A00 code in the Encyclopaedia of Chess Openings (ECO).


Description[edit]

White's 1.d3 releases his c1-bishop and makes a modest claim for the centre, but since it does not stake out as large a share of the centre as 1.d4 does, it is not a popular opening move. Of the twenty possible first moves for White, it ranks tenth in popularity. Nevertheless, since 1...d6 is playable by Black against any opening move from White,[1] it is playable by White as well. Black has many reasonable responses, such as 1...e5, 1...d5, 1...c5, 1...Nf6, and 1...g6.

The most famous use of this opening was in the third game in the rematch between Garry Kasparov and the Deep Blue computer in 1997.[2] Kasparov believed that the computer would play the opening poorly if it had to rely on its own skills rather than on its opening book. The game was drawn.[3] It had been previously used by David Levy in a prize match against Cray Blitz, where White won.[4]

Illustrative game[edit]

a b c d e f g h
8
Chessboard480.svg
a8 black rook
b8 black rook
d8 black bishop
h8 black king
f7 black pawn
g7 black pawn
h7 black bishop
a6 black pawn
c6 black knight
d6 black pawn
f6 black knight
h6 black pawn
c5 black pawn
d5 white knight
f5 white pawn
c4 white pawn
e4 white pawn
c3 white knight
d3 white pawn
a2 white rook
d2 white bishop
h2 white pawn
d1 white bishop
f1 white rook
g1 white king
8
7 7
6 6
5 5
4 4
3 3
2 2
1 1
a b c d e f g h
Position after 29...Nc6

Garry KasparovDeep Blue, game 3, May 1997[5]
1.d3 e5 2.Nf3 Nc6 3.c4 Nf6 4.a3 d6 5.Nc3 Be7 6.g3 0-0 7.Bg2 Be6 8.0-0 Qd7 9.Ng5 Bf5 10.e4 Bg4 11.f3 Bh5 12.Nh3 Nd4 13.Nf2 h6 14.Be3 c5 15.b4 b6 16.Rb1 Kh8 17.Rb2 a6 18.bxc5 bxc5 19.Bh3 Qc7 20.Bg4 Bg6 21.f4 exf4 22.gxf4 Qa5 23.Bd2 Qxa3 24.Ra2 Qb3 25.f5 Qxd1 26.Bxd1 Bh7 27.Nh3 Rfb8 28.Nf4 Bd8 29.Nfd5 Nc6 (see diagram) 30.Bf4 Ne5 31.Ba4 Nxd5 32.Nxd5 a5 33.Bb5 Ra7 34.Kg2 g5 35.Bxe5+ dxe5 36.f6 Bg6 37.h4 gxh4 38.Kh3 Kg8 39.Kxh4 Kh7 40.Kg4 Bc7 41.Nxc7 Rxc7 42.Rxa5 Rd8 43.Rf3 Kh8 44.Kh4 Kg8 45.Ra3 Kh8 46.Ra6 Kh7 47.Ra3 Kh8 48.Ra6 ½–½

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ The book An Explosive Chess Opening Repertoire for Black is devoted to giving "Black a complete opening repertoire with the opening move 1...d6." Jouni Yrjola and Jussi Tella, An Explosive Chess Opening Repertoire for Black, Gambit Publications Ltd., 2001, p. 6. ISBN 1-901983-50-1.
  2. ^ Kasparov vs. Deep Blue rematch, Game 3 (www.chessbase.com)
  3. ^ Chess Life, Special Summer Issue 1997.
  4. ^ Need 4 games Cray Blitz-Levy 1984 Computer Chess Club archives at stmintz.com
  5. ^ Kasparov Vs Deep Blue, Game 3, May 6, 1997 (www.chesscorner.com)

Bibliography