Miji languages

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Miji
Dhammai
Sajalong
Native to India
Region Arunachal Pradesh, India
Ethnicity Miji people
Native speakers
6,500  (2001)[1]
Language codes
ISO 639-3 sjl
Glottolog miji1239[2]
saja1240  (Sajalong / Miji)[3]
bang1369  (Bangru / Ləvai)[4]

Miji, also Dhammai or Sajalong, is a small language cluster of possibly Sino-Tibetan languages in Arunachal Pradesh, northeastern India. "Dialects" include at least two distinct languages, which are not particularly close, given only half of the vocabulary in common between the dialects of East Kameng District and West Kameng District. Long assumed to be a Sino-Tibetan language, it may actually be a language isolate.[5]

Varieties[edit]

There are 3 varieties of Miji.[5]

Distribution[edit]

According to Ethnologue, Miji is spoken in the following areas of Arunachal Pradesh.

  • West Kameng District, Nafra circle, Bichom and Pakesa river valley – 25 villages including Debbing, Dichik, Rurang, Nachinghom, Upper Dzang, Naku, Khellong, Dibrick, Nizong, Najang, Zangnaching, Chalang, Nafra, and Lower Dzang
  • East Kameng District: Bameng and Lada circles – Wakke, Nabolong, Kojo, Rojo, Sekong, Panker, Zarkam, Drackchi, Besai, Naschgzang, Sachung, Gerangzing, Kampaa, Salang, Pego, and Dongko villages

I.M. Simon (1979:iii) lists the following Miji villages from the Census of 1971.

  • 1. Challang [Cinlang] (16 houses, 95 people)
  • 2. Dibbin [Díbín] (15 houses, 206 people)
  • 3. Ditchik [Dícik] (34 houses, 328 people)
  • 4. Jang [Dzang] (27 houses, 261 people)
  • 5. Jang Nachin [Zanachin] (18 houses, 155 people)
  • 6. Khajalang (15 houses, 165 people)
  • 7. Khelong (26 houses, 236 people)
  • 8. Laphozu [Lapusa] (10 houses, 53 people)
  • 9. Mathow (20 houses, 175 people)
  • 10. Nakhu (29 houses, 299 people)
  • 11. Nachibun (14 houses, 100 people)
  • 12. Nizung [Nizhong] (6 houses, 48 people)
  • 13. Rurang (10 houses, 64 people)

Smaller hamlets include Dishin [Dícin] (11 households, 122 people), Devrik [Dívih], Diyung [Diyong], Nazang [Natsang], and Otung [Uthung]. Some Mijis have also live in Aka villages such as Dijungania, Buragaon, Tulu, Sarkingonia, and Yayung.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Miji at Ethnologue (17th ed., 2013)
  2. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Miji". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  3. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Sajalong / Miji". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  4. ^ Nordhoff, Sebastian; Hammarström, Harald; Forkel, Robert; Haspelmath, Martin, eds. (2013). "Bangru / Ləvai". Glottolog 2.2. Leipzig: Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology. 
  5. ^ a b c Blench, Roger; Post, Mark (2011), (De)classifying Arunachal languages: Reconstructing the evidence