Mike Ayers

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Mike Ayers
Sport(s) Football
Current position
Title Head coach
Team Wofford
Conference SoCon
Record 175–121–1
Biographical details
Born (1948-05-26) May 26, 1948 (age 66)
Georgetown, Kentucky
Playing career
? Georgetown (KY)
Position(s) Linebacker, offensive tackle
Coaching career (HC unless noted)
1974
1975
1976–1978
1979
1980–1982
1983–1984
1985–1987
1988–present
Georgetown (KY) (assistant)
Georgetown (KY) (DC)
Newberry (assistant)
Richmond (assistant)
Wofford (assistant)
East Tennessee State (DC)
East Tennessee State
Wofford
Head coaching record
Overall 187–142–2
Statistics
College Football Data Warehouse
Accomplishments and honors
Championships
4 SoCon (2003, 2007, 2010, 2012)
Awards
Eddie Robinson Award (2003)
5x SoCon Coach of the Year (2000, 2002–2003, 2007, 2010)

Mike Ayers (born May 26, 1948[1]) is the current head football coach of the Wofford Terriers located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. He has filled the position since 1988. Wofford College, with an enrollment of 1,550 students, is one of the smaller National Collegiate Athletic Association college football schools in Division I.[2] The Terriers compete in the Football Championship Subdivision as members of the Southern Conference.

Playing career[edit]

Ayers played linebacker and offensive tackle for the Tigers of Georgetown College. He also played for the baseball team and competed in gymnastics and wrestling.[1]

Coaching career[edit]

Ayers began his coaching career as a graduate assistant and defensive coordinator for Georgetown College in 1974 and 1975. He again performed the role of assistant during stops at Newberry and Richmond. In 1980 Ayers arrived at Wofford as defensive coordinator for the Terriers under head coach George F. "Buddy" Sasser. Ayers followed Sasser to East Tennessee State where he resumed his role as defensive coordinator before taking over the head coaching position in 1985. Ayers was hired as the head coach of the Terriers in 1988. Wofford moved up to Division I-AA in 1995 and joined the Southern Conference in 1997. Under Ayers, the Terriers have claimed four Southern Conference football championships, in 2003, 2007, 2010 and 2012, and participated in the playoffs six times.[1] Ayers won the Eddie Robinson Award, given to the most outstanding FCS head coach, in 2003 after guiding the Terriers to a 12–2 record.[3]He holds the black belt in karate, and is an accomplished artist and fly fisherman.

Head coaching record[edit]

Year Team Overall Conference Standing Bowl/playoffs TSN[4]#
East Tennessee State Buccaneers (Southern Conference) (1985–1987)
1985 East Tennessee State 0–10–1 0–7 9th
1986 East Tennessee State 6–5 4–3 4th
1987 East Tennessee State 5–6 2–5 7th
East Tennessee State: 11–21–1 6–15
Wofford Terriers (NCAA Division II independent) (1988–1994)
1988 Wofford 5–5
1989 Wofford 6–5
1990 Wofford 9–3 L NCAA Division II First Round
1991 Wofford 9–3 L NCAA Division II First Round
1992 Wofford 6–5
1993 Wofford 7–3–1
1994 Wofford 5–6
Wofford Terriers (NCAA Division I-AA independent) (1995–1996)
1995 Wofford 4–7
1996 Wofford 6–5
Wofford Terriers (Southern Conference) (1997–present)
1997 Wofford 3–7 2–6 6th
1998 Wofford 4–7 3–5 T–5th
1999 Wofford 6–5 5–3 2nd
2000 Wofford 7–4 5–3 3rd 23
2001 Wofford 4–7 3–5 5th
2002 Wofford 9–3 6–2 T–2nd 14
2003 Wofford 12–2 8–0 1st L NCAA Division I-AA Semifinal 3
2004 Wofford 8–3 4–3 T–2nd 18
2005 Wofford 6–5 3–4 T–4th
2006 Wofford 7–4 5–2 3rd 23
2007 Wofford 9–4 5–2 T–1st L NCAA Division I Quarterfinal 10
2008 Wofford 9–3 7–1 2nd L NCAA Division I First Round
2009 Wofford 3–8 2–6 T–7th
2010 Wofford 10–3 7–1 T–1st L NCAA Division I Quarterfinal 6
2011 Wofford 8–4 6–2 T–2nd L NCAA Division I Second Round 12
2012 Wofford 9–4 6–2 T–1st L NCAA Division I Quarterfinal 9
2013 Wofford 5–6 4–4 T–4th 9
Wofford: 175–121–1 81–51
Total: 187–142–2
      National championship         Conference title         Conference division title

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c "Mike Ayers: Head Coach". Wofford Athletics. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  2. ^ Joe Drape (2002-09-25). "Sports of The Times; At Little Wofford, Big Challenges". The New York Times. 
  3. ^ "Mike Ayers wins 2003 Eddie Robinson Award". The Sports Network. Retrieved 2008-07-17. 
  4. ^ Final poll standings are from The Sports Network.

External links[edit]