Mike Carlton

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Mike Carlton
Born (1946-01-31) 31 January 1946 (age 68)
Nationality Australian
Occupation Columnist, radio host, journalist, author
Spouse(s) Morag Ramsay

Mike Carlton (born 31 January 1946)[1] is an Australian media commentator and author. He formerly co-hosted the daily breakfast program on Sydney radio station 2UE with Peter FitzSimons and later Sandy Aloisi. He is a columnist for The Sydney Morning Herald, having been sacked from the position on 29 August 2008, for refusing to write his column during a strike by journalists at Fairfax Media.[2] After a lengthy campaign by Herald readers and the appointment of a new editor he was invited to rejoin the newspaper in 2009.[3]

Carlton is noted for his criticism of conservative public figures such as former Prime Minister John Howard, former Foreign Minister Alexander Downer [4] and radio personality Alan Jones, and for his disdain for conservative governments, including the United States' Bush administration.[5]

Early career[edit]

Carlton began his career as a cadet journalist with the Australian Broadcasting Commission (ABC) in 1963, aged 17. He has no tertiary education qualifications.[citation needed] His file reports as an ABC war correspondent in Vietnam earned him great admiration within the industry and a promotion to chief of the ABC's news bureau in Jakarta, Indonesia. Garnering further accolades on his return with the pioneering 1970s ABC-TV current affairs program This Day Tonight, he moved to his first radio program as host at Sydney commercial station 2GB in the early 1980s. In the early 1990s he was a presenter for London's LBC Newstalk 97.3FM, then under Australian ownership. At first he presented the drivetime programme, but it was as presenter of The Morning Report breakfast programme that he came to prominence, winning a prestigious Sony Radio Academy Award. This programme became required listening in London and helped to change the station's financial fortunes. He later wrote a novel set at a London talk radio station called Off the Air, which became a best-seller in Australia in the late 1990s.

Talk show host[edit]

In 1994 Carlton returned to Sydney to host a morning program on music station Mix 106.5. He then moved to the drive slot at 702 ABC Sydney. Building a large following and establishing a format that he has largely retained in the years since, he was then poached by commercial broadcaster 2UE. Carlton hosted 2UE's drivetime (3pm-6pm) program for a number of years, before moving to the breakfast timeslot (5:30 am – 9 am). In a move to improve ratings, 2UE management teamed Carlton with media personality, fellow Sydney Morning Herald columnist and longtime friend of Carlton's, Peter FitzSimons on the breakfast show in 2006. The ratings for the show gradually improved, however in mid-2007 they remained well behind the top two AM talk stations for the breakfast period. [6]

Peter FitzSimons left the show at the end of 2007, replaced by Sandy Aloisi from 2008. Carlton's former workmate, now rival, Alan Jones continued to dominate Sydney radio talkback.

A long-running feud with fellow 2UE broadcaster Stan Zemanek, noted for his conservative views, had become a feature of Carlton's recent career prior to Zemanek's death in mid-2007. On 17 July 2007, Carlton made comments regarding his late rival. Responding to a listener's question as to why he wouldn't attend Zemanek's funeral, Carlton replied that it would be "an act of sheer hypocrisy ... I loathed him." [7] He continued: "I'd only go to check that he was actually dead."[7] Carlton later apologised for the remarks,[8] which had been the subject of criticism from fellow radio presenters and 2UE staff.[9]

A highly popular feature of Carlton's long-running radio program (and indeed his previous radio career before he joined 2UE), was the weekly political satire segment, Friday News Review. The segment was well known for its fast-paced sketches, topical skewering of high-profile politicians, celebrities and sportspeople across the nation and around the world, and its extremely accurate voice-impersonations of the leading characters. As well as Carlton himself, most of the other characters in the segment were portrayed by Australian actor and television personality Josh Zepps. Friday News Review was one of the last political satire programs on mainstream commercial media in Australia.

On 18 September 2009, Carlton retired from his long-running 2UE Breakfast show after over 26 years on Australian morning radio citing an unwillingness to continue with early morning hours and a desire to spend more time with his family and newborn son.[10] In his last two weeks on air Carlton received well wishes from former Prime Ministers Kevin Rudd and Paul Keating, Dame Edna Everage, Kathy Lette, Michael Parkinson, John Laws and many others.[citation needed]

Author[edit]

He has published two books:[11]

Co-authored:

References[edit]

  1. ^ Carlton, Mike (29 January 2011). "Whinger! Salute to another great Australian trait". The Sydney Morning Herald. Retrieved 16 February 2014. 
  2. ^ "SMH columnist Carlton sacked over strike". The Sydney Morning Herald. 29 August 2008. Retrieved 2008-08-29. 
  3. ^ "Mike Carlton quits radio, returns to SMH". news.com.au. 7 September 2009. Retrieved 20 March 2010. 
  4. ^ "The More Things Change". ABC-TV 'Australian Story'. 23 April 2007. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  5. ^ "Innocence lost amid Labor's list of horrors". The Sydney Morning Herald. 21 November 2006. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  6. ^ "Dance star stumbles in the ratings". The Sydney Morning Herald. 9 May 2007. Retrieved 2007-07-18. 
  7. ^ a b Connolly, Fiona (18 July 2007). "I loathed Zemanek, says Carlton". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  8. ^ "Carlton under fire for on-air Zemanek attack". IBN News. 19 July 2007. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  9. ^ Connolly, Fiona (19 July 2007). "Zemanek slur puts Carlton's career 'on the line'". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved 2007-07-19. 
  10. ^ "Carlton off the air, back in the herald". The Sydney Morning Herald. 7 September 2009. Retrieved 2009-09-07. 
  11. ^ "Carlton, Mike". austlit.edu.au. Retrieved 6 March 2013.