Mike Chenault

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Mike Chenault
25th Speaker of the Alaska House of Representatives
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 20, 2009
Preceded by John Harris
Member of the Alaska House of Representatives
from the 34th district
Incumbent
Assumed office
January 20, 2003
Preceded by (redistricting took effect)
Member of the Alaska House of Representatives
from the 9th district
In office
January 8, 2001 – January 20, 2003
Preceded by Harold Smalley
Succeeded by (redistricting takes effect)
Personal details
Born (1957-02-25) February 25, 1957 (age 57)
Hobbs, New Mexico
Political party Republican
Spouse(s) Tanna
Children Brandon, Elisha, Shanda, Miranda
Residence Nikiski, Alaska

Charles Michael "Mike" Chenault[1] is the Republican Speaker of the Alaska House of Representatives for the 26th Alaska State Legislature. He currently represents Alaska's 34th District, which encompasses most of the central Kenai Peninsula, exclusive of the cities of Kenai and Soldotna and the area in between.[2] He is a member of several committees, including the Labor & Commerce Committee, the Economic Development, Trade & Tourism Special Committee, and the Legislative Council. He also serves on the Court System, Governor, Legislature, and the University Of Alaska Finance Subcommittees, for the 26th Legislature.[3] Mike Chenault is also the former Vice-President of the Qwick Construction Company.[4]

Personal life[edit]

Representative Chenault has a wife: Tanna and four children: Brandon, Elisha, Shanda and Miranda. Mike Chenault graduated from Kenai Central High School in 1975.[5]

References[edit]

  1. ^ Directory 26th Alaska Legislature 2009-2010 (Second Session ed.). Juneau: Alaska Legislative Council. 2010. p. 7. 
  2. ^ Mike Chenault. Ballotpedia. Retrieved on September 14, 2011.
  3. ^ Rep. Mike Chenault - 27th AK Legislature House Majority. Housemajority.org. Retrieved on September 14, 2011.
  4. ^ Project Vote Smart - Representative Charles M. 'Mike' Chenault - Biography. Votesmart.org (February 25, 1957). Retrieved on September 14, 2011.
  5. ^ The Alaska State Legislature. House.legis.state.ak.us (February 25, 1957). Retrieved on September 14, 2011.

External links[edit]