Mike Gold (comics)

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Michael Gold
Born (1950-08-04) August 4, 1950 (age 64)
Chicago, IL
Nationality American
Area(s) Writer, Editor, Publisher
Notable works
First Comics
DC Comics
ComicMix

http://www.comicmix.com

Michael Gold (born August 4, 1950)[1] was media coordinator for the defense for the Chicago Conspiracy Trial, is a former Group Editor and Director of Editorial Development at DC Comics, co-founder of First Comics, and the co-founder and director of communication National Runaway Switchboard as well as a disk jockey in Chicago in the 1970s.

Gold launched First Comics in 1983 with a line-up of creators including Frank Brunner, Mike Grell, Howard Chaykin, Joe Staton, Steven Grant, Timothy Truman, and John Ostrander. Among the titles Gold edited were Chaykin's satirical futuristic cop series American Flagg; Ostrander and Truman's GrimJack; Mike Baron & Steve Rude's Nexus; Badger; Jim Starlin's space opera series Dreadstar and Mike Grell's Jon Sable Freelance,[2] which was briefly adapted for TV.

In 1986, Gold left First Comics and returned to DC, where he edited Legends, The Shadow, The Question, Action Comics Weekly, Green Arrow: The Longbow Hunters, Blackhawk, and Hawkworld.[3]

In 2005, Gold revived Jon Sable Freelance and GrimJack for IDW Publishing with new miniseries and reprint collections of the First Comics issues, and would also publish a complete collection of Mars.

In 2006, Gold co-founded ComicMix with Brian Alvey and Glenn Hauman.

In 2011, he received the first Humanitarian Award from the Hero Initiative during the Harvey Awards ceremony at the Baltimore Comic-Con.

Gold has worked with the Organic Theater Company of Chicago and the American Shakespeare Theatre, been involved with numerous political efforts, and a significant contributor to an award-winning Head Start and early childhood education program for the Child Care Center of Stamford. His writings have appeared in a wide range of newspapers and magazines, including The Chicago Tribune, The Realist and MacUser magazine.

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