Mike Keane

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Mike Keane
Mike Keane.jpg
Keane with the Manitoba Moose.
Born (1967-05-29) May 29, 1967 (age 47)
Winnipeg, MB, CAN
Height 5 ft 10 in (178 cm)
Weight 185 lb (84 kg; 13 st 3 lb)
Position Right Wing
Shot Right
Played for Montreal Canadiens
Colorado Avalanche
New York Rangers
Dallas Stars
St. Louis Blues
Vancouver Canucks
National team  Canada
NHL Draft Undrafted
Playing career 1987–2010

Michael John Keane (born May 29, 1967) is a retired Canadian professional ice hockey winger. Undrafted, Keane played over 1100 games in the National Hockey League from 1988 until 2004, and then played five seasons for his hometown Manitoba Moose of the American Hockey League until he retired in 2010. Keane is a 3-time Stanley Cup champion, having won with the Montreal Canadiens in 1993, Colorado Avalanche in 1996 and the Dallas Stars in 1999. He is one of only ten players in Stanley Cup history to win the Cup with three different teams.[1] On September 3, 2013, the Winnipeg Jets announced the hiring of Mike Keane as Assistant of Player Development

Playing career[edit]

Keane began his junior hockey career in the Junior A Manitoba Junior Hockey League (MJHL) with the Winnipeg South Blues. He then joined the major junior ranks in the Western Hockey League (WHL) with the Moose Jaw Warriors. Undrafted out of junior, Keane signed as a free agent on the September 25, 1985, with the Montreal Canadiens and started his NHL career in 1988. He helped the Canadiens to a Stanley Cup championship in 1993, his fourth NHL season. He spent eight seasons in Montreal and was captain of the team from April 1995 to December 1995. Upon inheriting the team's captaincy from the departed Kirk Muller, Keane drew controversy in the French media after saying he did not believe it was necessary to speak French, since players on the team spoke predominantly English.[2]

After Kirk Muller was traded near the end of the 1994-95 season, Keane was named as the 23rd captain of the Montreal Canadiens. Keane was subject to media scrutiny after speaking to Mathias Brunet of La Presse (a French language newspaper). Keane declared that he had no intention of learning French.[3] During the 1995–96 NHL season, Keane was traded along with Patrick Roy to the Colorado Avalanche in exchange for Jocelyn Thibault, Andrei Kovalenko and Martin Ručinský. He won his second Stanley Cup that season, helping the Avalanche defeat the Florida Panthers in four games in the Finals. Keane spent another season with the Avalanche, before becoming a free agent in the summer of 1997. He signed with the New York Rangers, where he played for half a season before being traded again to the Dallas Stars. Keane played in Dallas until 2000–01, helping the Stars win the Stanley Cup in 1999 and return to the finals the next year. He started the 2001–02 NHL season with the St. Louis Blues but finished that season back with Colorado.

Keane stayed in Colorado until he left for the Vancouver Canucks at the start of the 2003–04 NHL season. Keane signed with his hometown team, the Manitoba Moose, for 2004–05 AHL season. Keane played 6 seasons for the Moose. He was named captain in 2005 and remained Manitoba's captain until July 20, 2010 when his contract was not renewed. Keane was also captain of the AHL All-Star Team Canada in 2007. Keane's number 12 jersey was retired February 12, 2011 when the Manitoba Moose took on the San Antonio Rampage at the MTS Centre. Keane's number is the only number retired in Manitoba Moose history.

International play[edit]

Keane competed for Team Canada at the 1987 World Junior Championships in Czechoslovakia. While playing for the gold medal against the Soviet Union, both teams were disqualified as a result of the infamous Punch-up in Piestany.

Awards[edit]

Career statistics[edit]

Regular season Playoffs
Season Team League GP G A Pts PIM GP G A Pts PIM
1983–84 Winnipeg Monarchs MMMHL 21 17 19 36 59
1983–84 Winnipeg Warriors WHL 1 0 0 0 0
1984–85 Moose Jaw Warriors WHL 65 17 26 43 141
1985–86 Moose Jaw Warriors WHL 67 34 49 83 162 13 6 8 14 9
1986–87 Moose Jaw Warriors WHL 53 25 45 70 107 9 3 9 12 11
1986–87 Sherbrooke Canadiens AHL 9 2 2 4 16
1987–88 Sherbrooke Canadiens AHL 78 25 43 68 70 6 1 1 2 18
1988–89 Montreal Canadiens NHL 69 16 19 35 69 21 4 3 7 17
1989–90 Montreal Canadiens NHL 74 9 15 24 78 11 0 1 1 8
1990–91 Montreal Canadiens NHL 73 13 23 36 50 12 3 2 5 6
1991–92 Montreal Canadiens NHL 67 11 30 41 64 8 1 1 2 16
1992–93 Montreal Canadiens NHL 77 15 45 60 95 19 2 13 15 6
1993–94 Montreal Canadiens NHL 80 16 30 46 119 6 3 1 4 4
1994–95 Montreal Canadiens NHL 48 10 10 20 15
1995–96 Montreal Canadiens NHL 18 0 7 7 6
1995–96 Colorado Avalanche NHL 55 10 10 20 40 22 3 2 5 16
1996–97 Colorado Avalanche NHL 81 10 17 27 63 17 3 1 4 24
1997–98 New York Rangers NHL 70 8 10 18 47
1997–98 Dallas Stars NHL 13 2 3 5 5 17 4 4 8 0
1998–99 Dallas Stars NHL 81 6 23 29 62 23 5 2 7 6
1999–00 Dallas Stars NHL 81 13 21 34 41 23 2 4 6 14
2000–01 Dallas Stars NHL 67 10 14 24 35 10 3 2 5 4
2001–02 St. Louis Blues NHL 56 4 6 10 22
2001–02 Colorado Avalanche NHL 22 2 5 7 16 18 1 4 5 8
2002–03 Colorado Avalanche NHL 65 5 5 10 34 6 0 0 0 2
2003–04 Vancouver Canucks NHL 64 8 9 17 20 7 0 0 0 4
2005–06 Manitoba Moose AHL 69 3 11 14 66 12 2 1 3 4
2006–07 Manitoba Moose AHL 74 8 17 25 46 13 2 2 4 7
2007–08 Manitoba Moose AHL 73 8 8 16 36 6 0 0 0 6
2008–09 Manitoba Moose AHL 74 8 20 28 47 22 4 7 11 6
2009–10 Manitoba Moose AHL 75 9 22 31 49 6 0 2 2 7
WHL totals 186 76 120 196 410 22 9 17 26 20
AHL totals 443 61 121 182 314 74 11 15 26 64
NHL totals 1161 168 302 470 881 220 34 40 74 135

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Players on Stanley-Cup Winning Teams". Retrieved 2010-04-13. 
  2. ^ "Koivu not the first Hab captain to face French fire". Canada.com. 2007-11-04. Retrieved 2008-11-10. 
  3. ^ Patrick Roy, winning, nothing else, p.341, by Michel Roy, translated by Charles Phillips, 2008, John Wiley & Sons, Mississauga, ON, ISBN 978-0-470-15616-2

External links[edit]

Preceded by
Kirk Muller
Montreal Canadiens captain
1995
Succeeded by
Pierre Turgeon