Mike Logan (American football)

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Mike Logan
No. 31
Safety
Personal information
Date of birth: (1974-09-15) September 15, 1974 (age 40)
Place of birth: Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Career information
High school: McKeesport (PA)
College: West Virginia
NFL Draft: 1997 / Round: 2 / Pick: 50
Debuted in 1997 for the Jacksonville Jaguars
Career history
Career highlights and awards
Career NFL statistics
Stats at NFL.com
Stats at DatabaseFootball.com

Mike V. Logan (born September 15, 1974) is former American professional football player for the NFL.

High school[edit]

Mike Logan attended high school at McKeesport Area High School in McKeesport, Pennsylvania. He played football for the Tigers under famed WPIAL coach George Smith.

College career[edit]

Mike Logan was a four-year regular at cornerback and one of the most talented return men in WVU history from 1993-96.

Playing for coach Don Nehlen, Logan was one of the best recruits out of Pennsylvania, but his career at West Virginia was limited by breaking the same arm three times. Logan appeared in 37 games, starting 22 during his career, recording 140 tackles, 18 passes broken up, two forced fumbles, eight interceptions and two fumble recoveries.

Logan finished his career ranking seventh in school history with 18 passes broken up (now ranks 15th), fourth in single-season PBU with 11 (now ranks 13th) and sixth in career kick return yardage with 869 yards (now ranks 12th).

As a senior, Logan led the Big East in punt returns (12.4) and ranked second in interceptions (0.45) and PBU (11). He was named to the Football News all-conference team. Logan earned first team All-Big East honors at cornerback and second team all-conference recognition as a return specialist.

Logan was a hero in the East Carolina win in 1996, coming through with a first-half interception and then stripping a pass from ECU’s Larry Shannon at the WVU eight in the fourth quarter, returning that fumble 25 yards.

As a freshman, in 1993, Logan recovered a Boston College fumble at the WVU 37 yard-line with 2:23 remaining to set up WVU’s final scoring drive and then intercepted a Glenn Foley pass in the end zone on the game’s last play to preserve WVU’s undefeated regular season and a 1994 Sugar Bowl appearance. Logan also played in the 1995 Carquest Bowl and 1997 Gator Bowl.

Logan had a career-best nine tackles in the 21-0 win over Pitt in 1995, had two interceptions in the 13-0 win over Maryland in 1996 and returned a punt for a touchdown in the 30-10 win at Temple in 1996.

He received the Scott Shirley Award in 1993, presented to WVU’s top special teams player, and received the Gridiron Gladiator Award in 1996, given for on-field intensity. He is a member of the 1990-99 WVU all-time football team.

His achievements as a Mountaineer and in the NFL earned him induction into the West Virginia Sports Hall of Fame in September 2014.[1]

Pro career[edit]

After a college career at West Virginia University, Logan was a second-round draft pick for the Jacksonville Jaguars in 1997. As a rookie, Logan only recorded 15 tackles, but improved his second season to 29 tackles. He recorded his first NFL interception in his final and best season in Jacksonville, 2000. Logan recorded 60 tackles that year, along with his first career sack and two interceptions.

Logan then went to the Pittsburgh Steelers for the 2001 season, bringing him home to play for the team he grew up idolizing. Logan started out slowly his first two years in Pittsburgh, but by the 2003 season he had broken out. Logan had a career-high 94 tackles that year along with a sack. Unlike his previous two seasons of 2001 and 2002, Logan had no interceptions in 2003 (he had two INTs in 2001 and 1 INT in 2002). After being re-signed in 2004, Logan produced a career-worst 8 tackles for the season after suffering a season-ending injury and being placed on the injured reserve list. Logan tried to bounce back in 2005, but he was already a backup by then. Logan was a part of the championship Super Bowl XL team for the Steelers and won his first Super Bowl ring. He retired from professional football prior to the 2007 football season.

NFL stats[edit]

Year Team Games Combined Tackles Tackles Assisted Tackles Sacks Forced Fumbles Fumble Recoveries Fumble Return Yards Interceptions Interception Return Yards Yards per Interception Return Longest Interception Return Interceptions Returned for Touchdown Passes Defended
1997 JAX 11 8 5 3 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
1998 JAX 15 18 12 6 0.0 1 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 5
1999 JAX 2 1 0 1 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2000 JAX 15 53 47 6 1.0 1 1 0 2 14 7 14 0 6
2001 PIT 16 37 33 4 2.0 1 1 0 2 2 1 2 0 7
2002 PIT 14 40 30 10 0.5 2 0 0 1 46 46 46 0 8
2003 PIT 16 93 70 23 1.0 1 3 0 0 0 0 0 0 7
2004 PIT 3 7 5 2 0.0 1 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2005 PIT 12 24 16 8 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 1
2006 PIT 12 13 11 2 0.0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
Career 116 294 229 65 4.5 7 6 0 5 62 12 46 0 35

[2]

Radio[edit]

Logan has remained in the Pittsburgh area as a radio personality. He co-hosted the weekday afternoon show "The Drive with Paulsen, Logan & Mack" on 1250 ESPN Radio with Scott Paulsen and Chris Mack until the station went off the air in September 2010.

Facts[edit]

  • Since the retirement of fellow safety Donnie Shell following the 1987 NFL season, Logan is the only Steelers player to have worn number 31. Although the number is considered unofficially retired by the team, the Steelers likely allowed Logan to wear number 31 because of him idolizing Shell growing up in Pittsburgh.
  • Following the Steelers win in Super Bowl XL, Logan responded that he did not want to go to Disney World, but that he wanted Kennywood to open up. Kennywood, which is located in West Mifflin where Logan grew up, is not open during the winter months. He currently resides in Pittsburgh.

References[edit]

  1. ^ http://www.wvusports.com/hallOfFame.cfm?func=viewProfile&hofID=250
  2. ^ "Mike Logan Stats". ESPN Internet Ventures. Retrieved 16 May 2014. 

External links[edit]