Mikel Scicluna

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Mikel Scicluna
Mikel Scicluna.jpg
Birth name Mikel Scicluna
Born July 29, 1929[1]
Balzan, Malta[1][2]
Died March 20, 2010[3] (aged 80)
Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
Professional wrestling career
Ring name(s) Mike Valentino[1]
Baron Mikel Scicluna[1]
Billed height 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m)[1]
Billed weight 265 lb (120 kg)[1]
Billed from Isle of Malta[1]
Debut 1953[1]
Retired 1983[1]

"Baron" Mikel Scicluna (July 29, 1929 – March 20, 2010) was a Maltese professional wrestler who gained his fame during the 1960s and 1970s.[4]

Professional wrestling career[edit]

Scicluna started wrestling during the 1950s,[5] and used the name Mike Valentino early in his career. Scicluna worked primarily in Canada until 1965, when he ventured to the World Wide Wrestling Federation (WWWF), now known as WWE, using his most famous moniker "Baron" Mikel Scicluna.[1]

Scicluna was famous for entering the ring with a royal blue cape over his shoulders, indicating that he was of Maltese royal descent. Scicluna was also known for being a master of the "foreign object", mainly utilizing a roll of coins to bash opponents out of sight of the referee.[1] He enjoyed success as a tag team wrestler, winning the WWWF United States Tag Team Championship with Smasher Sloan on September 22, 1966, in Washington, D.C. (though they eventually lost the belts in the same city to Spiros Arion and Antonio Pugliese), then the WWWF World Tag Team Championship with King Curtis Iaukea on February 1, 1972, in Philadelphia.[6][7]

In singles competition, Scicluna defeated Spiros Arion for Australia's IWA World Championship on June 15, 1968, and would challenge Bruno Sammartino and Pedro Morales for the WWWF Championship from time to time. One of his biggest career wins was pinning Waldo Von Erich in six minutes at Madison Square Garden, prior to two Garden title matches with Sammartino. In the first match at MSG against Sammartino he was disqualified; Sammartino scored the pin in a rematch. Scicluna went on to lose a series of matches to Spiros Arion.[1] In June 1976, Scicluna found himself part of history, as the opponent for Gorilla Monsoon on the night Monsoon engaged in an impromptu tussle with boxing great Muhammad Ali. Scicluna was wrestling Monsoon in a televised match and was sent over the top rope to the floor after receiving a Manchurian Chop. Scicluna waved off his opponent and walked off, taking a countout loss. From there, Ali entered the ring from the audience and tried to jab at Monsoon. Monsoon responded by dropping Ali with an airplane spin. This angle was a part of the buildup toward Ali's infamous boxer vs. wrestler match with Antonio Inoki later in the month.[1]

Scicluna retired from active competition in 1983.[1] He was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 1996.[1]

Personal life[edit]

He was the son of Vincenzo Scicluna and Maria (née' Catania) who were married in Mosta, Malta, on 27 August 1927. Named after his paternal grandfather Michele Scicluna. In retirement, he lived in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania.[1] He also worked as a driver for the New York Times.[2] He had a wife, Gloria, and one son.[2] Scicluna died March 20, 2010, from cancer.[2]

Championships and accomplishments[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r Solomon, Brian (2006). WWE Legends. Pocket Books. pp. 227–230. ISBN 978-0-7434-9033-7. 
  2. ^ a b c d Oliver, Greg (March 22, 2010). "Saying goodbye to Baron Mikel Scicluna". SLAM! Wrestling. Retrieved 2010-03-27. 
  3. ^ "One of WWWF's longest lasting stars passes away after long battle with cancer", Wrestling Observer/Figure Four Online, March 21, 2010
  4. ^ Obituary New York Times, March 25, 2010; page A29.
  5. ^ Baron Mikel Scicluna. Record Book. (Retrieved on January 31, 2009.)
  6. ^ a b Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2006). "WWWF United States Tag Team Title". Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. p. 18. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 
  7. ^ a b Royal Duncan & Gary Will (2006). "WWF World Tag Team Title". Wrestling Title Histories (4th ed.). Archeus Communications. p. 17. ISBN 0-9698161-5-4. 

External links[edit]