Mikhail Goldstein

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Mikhail Emmanuilovich Goldstein (Russian: Михаил Эммануилович Гольдштейн; pen name: Mikhailo Mykhailovsky; 8 November [O.S. 26 October] 1917 – 7 September 1989), was a Soviet composer and violinist of Ukrainian-Jewish origin, brother of prominent violinist Boris Goldstein.

Biography[edit]

Goldstein was born in Odessa in 1917. He was the author of the celebrated musical hoax "Ovsianiko-Kulikovsky's Symphony No. 21" as well as several others, notably "Expromt" by Balakirev", "Albumblatt" (Листок из Альбома) by Glazunov"' the "Viola Concerto in C Major" by Ivan Khandoshkin, etc. He concentrated on composition after his career as a violinist was curtailed by a hand injury.

He was a winner of three prizes at the 1963 All-Union Composers' Competition (compositions for violin and cello). Apparently he submitted his entries under pseudonyms.[1] After this incident his political difficulties increased. He took a teaching position in East Berlin in 1964. He moved to Vienna and Jerusalem in 1967, moved to London in 1968, and finally to Hamburg, Germany in 1969, where he died. He gave concerts with Galina Kowal and Michael Minsky.

His musical and civic activities were recognized in Germany with the Bundesverdienstkreuz medal.

He died in Hamburg in 1989, aged 71.

Note[edit]

All references regarding Goldstein have been removed from Ukrainian encyclopedias. These include not only Soviet publications but also contemporary publications and emigre diaspora publications.

Sources[edit]

  1. ^ "Советская Культура" 1/12/1963
  • Сорокер, Я. Євреї в музиці України - Сучасність, 2 (286) (лютий, 1995) 54-65.
  • Гольдштейн М. Записки музыканта. Франкфурт-на-Майне, 1970
  • Полищук, Ян. Гений или злодей. "Литературная газета" 5 января 1959 г.
  • Музыкальная подделка. В кн.: Энциклопедический музыкальный словарь. Изд. Москва, 1966 г., Стр. 331.

External links[edit]