Miles Hawk

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M.2 Hawk
MHawk.jpg
Role Two-seat light monoplane
Manufacturer Miles Aircraft Limited
Designer Frederick George Miles
First flight 1933
Number built 47
Unit cost
395UKP
Variants Miles Hawk Major

The Miles M.2 Hawk was a 1930s British two-seat light monoplane designed by Miles Aircraft Limited.

Design and development[edit]

The Hawk was designed in 1933 by F.G. Miles. Unusual for the time, the Hawk was a low-wing cantilever monoplane with wings designed to be folded. It had an open cockpit for two in tandem. The prototype powered by a 95 hp ADC Cirrus IIIA engine was built by Philips and Powis Limited (now known as Miles Aircraft) at Woodley Aerodrome and first flew on the 29 March 1933. The aircraft sold well for the time, the price of only 395 pounds and the benefits of a monoplane (it did not need to be rigged). A number of one off variants were built, including a cabin monoplane (M.2A), a long-range single-seater (M.2B) and three-seat versions for joy riding (M.2D). In 1934 due to a shortage of Cirrus engines an improved version was introduced, the Miles Hawk Major.

Variants[edit]

M.2
Production two-seat version with one 95 hp A.D.C. Cirrus IIIA engine.
M.2A
Cabin version powered by a de Havilland Gipsy III engine, one built.
M.2B
Long-range single-seater powered by an A.D.C Cirrus Hermes IV, one-built.
M.2C
Re-engined with one 120 hp de Havilland Gipsy III engine, one built.
M.2D
Three-seat version with one 95 hp A.D.C. Cirrus IIIA engine, six built.

Operators[edit]

Military operators[edit]

 Australia
 New Zealand
 South Africa

Specifications (M.2)[edit]

General characteristics

  • Capacity: Two
  • Length: 40 ft 7 in (12.37 m)
  • Wingspan: 33 ft 0 in (10.06 m)
  • Height: 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m)
  • Wing area: 169 ft2 (15.7 m2)
  • Powerplant: 1 × ADC Cirrus IIIA piston engine, 95 hp (71 kW) each

Performance

  • Maximum speed: 115 mph (185 km/h)
  • Cruise speed: 100 mph (161 km/h)
  • Range: 450 miles (725 km)
  • Service ceiling: 16,000 ft (4,880 m)
  • Rate of climb: 860 ft/min (4.4 m/s)

See also[edit]

Related development

References[edit]

Notes[edit]

Bibliography[edit]

  • Amos, Peter. and Brown, Don Lambert. Miles Aircraft Since 1925, Volume 1. London: Putnam Aeronautical, 2000. ISBN 0-85177-787-2.
  • Brown, Don Lambert. Miles Aircraft Since 1925. London: Putnam & Company Ltd., 1970. ISBN 0-370-00127-3.
  • The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Aircraft (Part Work 1982-1985). Orbis Publishing.
  • Jackson, A.J. British Civil Aircraft since 1919. London: Putnam, 1974. ISBN 0-370-10014-X.
  • Jackson, A.J. British Civil Aircraft since 1919, Volume 3. London: Putnam, 1988. ISBN 0-85177-818-6.