Miles Richardson

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Miles Richardson
Miles Richardson, Henry V.jpg
Miles Richardson as the Duke of Exeter in the Royal Shakespeare Company's production of Henry V.
Born (1963-07-15) 15 July 1963 (age 50)
London, England, United Kingdom
Occupation Actor
Spouse(s) Beverley Cressman (1994-2009; divorced)
Parents Ian Richardson

Miles Richardson is a British actor.

Richardson was born on 15 July 1963 in Battersea, London to parents Ian Richardson (the well-known Shakespearean actor) and Maroussia Frank (daughter of dancer and critic Elizabeth Frank), both founder members of the Royal Shakespeare Company. He was educated and brought up in London, Stratford-upon-Avon and New York.

He graduated from Arts Educational Drama College in 1982, where he won the award for Best Actor. Previously he had worked as a child actor for the Royal Shakespeare Company.

In 2009, he placed his father's ashes in the newly refurbished Royal Shakespeare Company's theatre in Stratford-upon-Avon.

Theatre work[edit]

Repertory Theatre[edit]

Richardson has worked extensively in repertory theatre throughout the United Kingdom, including Newcastle upon Tyne, York, Birmingham, Pitlochry and Mold, Flintshire. His credits include Macbeth, Othello, The Caucasian Chalk Circle, Wuthering Heights, The Three Musketeers, Charley's Aunt, Cause Célèbre, All's Well That Ends Well, Private Lives, "A Dolls House", "Romeo and Juliet" (three times) and "A Midsummer Night's Dream" (Also three times). He played Sherlock Holmes in a newly devised play called Sherlock Holmes and the case at Sir Arthur Sullivan's. His father also played the sleuth for television.

West End[edit]

His West End credits include Another Country, An Evening with Gary Lineker, The Invisible Man, " All's Well That Ends Well',A Midsummer Night's Dream and As You Like It. He has toured in the Far East and the United States of America, most notably in the Almeida's production of "Lulu". He appeared in "Anjin" an Anglo-Japanese co-production in 2009/10 in Tokyo and Osaka and again in 2012/13 in Tokyo and London. Both productions directed by Gregory Doran. From November 2013 until March 2014, he appeared as 'Juror 10' in Twelve Angry Men at the Garrick Theatre.[1]

Royal Shakespeare Company[edit]

From 2003 to 2008, he was a member of the Royal Shakespeare Company appearing in All's Well That Ends Well with Dame Judi Dench. He had already played with Dench in Peter Hall's film version of A Midsummer Night's Dream in 1967.

He took part in the RSC's Histories Ensemble playing in Henry IV, part 1 and 2, Henry V, Henry VI, part 1, 2, and 3 and Richard III which won three Olivier Awards in 2009 for Best Company Performance, Best Revival and Best Costume Design.[2]


Film and Television work[edit]

He has carved himself a niche in film and television work, normally playing nasty upper class cads. He acted alongside his father in Channel Four's adaptation of Porterhouse Blue in 1987. He appeared in three episodes of Midsomer Murders, he has had parts in 'Allo 'Allo, "Doctors"(three times) Maurice, The Remains of the Day, Highlander: The Raven, Hope it Rains and Dirk Gently. He was Tony Slattery's butler in P's & Q's and Sir Roger Moore's butler in "Christmas at Castlebury". He provided his voice for Flushed Awayand "Cars 2" as. He was the head of the assassins' league in The Colour of Magic. He played Charles I in The Regicides and has played his son, Charles II, twice, once on stage and once on television. More recently, he played the Duke of Kent for the Japanese television production of Jiru and John Jacob Astor in Lord Julian Fellowes adaptation of the "Titanic" story. More recently he appeared as Harry Thornton in Stephen Poliakov's 'Dancing on the Edge'.

Richardson also plays Irving Braxiatel in the long running Bernice Summerfield and Gallifrey audio dramas by Big Finish Productions. He has provided his voice for over 100 films and video games as an ADR artist.

Other work[edit]

As well as acting, he has also directed theatre and film productions, been a screenwriter, freelance journalist, lecturer and teacher, specialising in the works of Shakespeare.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Fiona Mountford (12 November 2013). "Twelve Angry Men, Garrick Theatre - review". London Evening Standard (Alexander Lebedev/Evgeny Lebedev/Daily Mail and General Trust). Retrieved 24 January 2014. 
  2. ^ Shaw, Vicky (9 March 2009). "Stewart scoops third Olivier award". Press Association National Newswire (The Press Association). 

External links[edit]